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-   -   Gun Nut Tip of the Week: Shotgun Buying 101 (http://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=695235)

Reedo302 08-01-2009 12:58 PM

Gun Nut Tip of the Week: Shotgun Buying 101
 
Figured I'd start my own series of How-Tos based off my many years of firearms sales and weapons development. This is just an informative guide to people new to firearms. Other topics and types of firearms will be added in the next few weeks. Hopefully this will answer some questions for people looking to get into a particular firearm type who haven't yet done so. Enjoy! :hi:





SHOTGUNS



Shotguns are defined as a long gun which shoots cartridges sized by bore measurements called "Guages". The typical caliber is designated by the bore size number, then by guage. Example: 12 Gauge, 20 Guage, etc. .410 Bore is the only one not denoted by "guage". Shotguns are associated with shooting cartridges that contain multiple pellets, be it bird shot or buck shot. Shotguns also shoot single bullet-like projectiles called slugs.



If you wish to buy a shotgun, there are several factors you should consider when deciding which shotgun or which type of shotgun to purchase. The following are factors that will help determine which shotgun will best suit your needs.



Usage:

The most important factor in determining which shotgun to buy is what you plan to use the shotgun for. Certain shotguns are designed to accomplish certain specific tasks better than others. Some shotguns are general all-around types, while others are very specific usage oriented (such as competition single-barrel BT-99s). Main uses are as follows:

1. Hunting

2. Home Defense/Protection

3. Sporting Competition (Trap/Skeet/Clays)

4. Service/Tactical



1. Hunting: Hunting shotguns, also known as field shotguns, are typically designed to have a multiple cartridge capacity. What kind of shotgun you will buy will depend on what you plan to primarily hunt. People who are devout upland bird hunters (pheasant, grouse, partridge) often will shoot pump, semi-auto, or double-barrel shotguns. If someone primarily plans to hunt waterfowl, pump and semi-auto shotguns are favored, while some people do enjoy the use of a double-barrel shotgun. If you plan to hunt deer or big game by using a slug, pump, semi-auto, bolt action or single shot shotguns are desireable while double-barrel shotguns are usually avoided. Hunting shotguns are subject to high amounts of wear and tear and abuse. In terms of auto racing, the hunting shotguns are the endurance cars (24hr LeMans) of shotguns. They have to take a beating and keep going. Field shotguns typically have barrel lengths ranging from 24" to 30". Hunting gauges vary depending on game, with cartridges ranging from the larger 10ga to the small .410 Bore. Most common sizes are 12ga and 20ga.

2. Home Defense/Protection: While all shotguns can be used for home defense, certain shotguns are more desirable than others. Most people tend to choose pump action shotguns for home defense. Pumps are considered the most reliable, while also being easy to operate and relatively inexpensive. There's also something to be said about the psychological impact and fear that the sound of a pump shotgun being shucked in the darkness creates. Some people favor semi-auto shotguns for home defense, but the tactical versions are the most useful and popular. All other shotgun actions are inappropriate due to insufficient magazine capacity or too slow of a rate of fire. Home defense-specific shotguns usually have a 18.5" barrel length, making them easier to maneuver in tight quarters. 12ga is the most common chambering.

3. Sporting Competition: Sporting competition shotguns are similar to hunting shotguns. Often times, sporting competition specific guns are just modified variants of the field versions. Sporting competition involves shooting at moving targets made out of clay or other breakable material. The targets are usually very small and are round in shape and either launched through the air or rolled on the ground. For this purpose, the type of gun used will vary depending on the type of competition. A pump shotgun is usually the best overall general shotgun. Semi-automatics tend to work very nicely as well, although they are usually less capable of handling lighter shotgun loads favored by many shooters. Over/Under double-barrel shotguns are heavily used in competition due to the ability to use two different choke tubes to utilize the optimum preferred shooting pattern for your pellets. The tighter the choke, the tighter the group, the longer the shot can be. Side-by-side shotguns are rarely used for sporting competition purposes. Single barrel/single shot shotguns are used in this category as well. Several companies make high-end competition-specific single-shot shotguns that are amazing and accurate. Sporting Competition shotguns will usually have barrel lengths ranging from 28" to 34". The longer barrel is desirable because of the added mass which helps for a smoother swing and easier follow-through. Sporting competition chamberings vary depending on type of pursuit, but most people stick in the 12ga to 28ga range. 12ga and 20ga are most popular, but 16ga and 28ga do have their place, despite how difficult ammo sometimes is to locate.

4. Tactical/Service: Tactical/Service shotguns are typically used by law enforcement or military personnel for tactical offensive purposes. Often times, their specific usage is for close quarters battle (CQB) situations. These shotguns are very similar, and often times the same as tactical competition shotguns. Preferred shotguns are usually pump action shotguns due to high reliability and capability to shoot alternative rounds like less lethal bean bag or rubber bullet rounds. Many organizations are starting to use semi-automatic shotguns due to enhanced reliability and the higher rate of fire of semi-auto shotguns. Most tactical shotguns have either 14" barrels or 18.5" barrels, depending on the usage. 14" models are more desirable for law enforcement and entry usage, and are only available to law enforcement/government/military organizations. 18.5" barrel versions are typically available to the general public. Tactical/Service shotguns usually have pistol grip style stocks with either fixed butts or folding butt stocks. Standard stocks are rarely used for this category. For this role, 12ga is the standard round.



Your desired usage will dictate what shotgun will best suit you. Often times, one shotgun can fill multiple niches. A pump action field shotgun can also be used for sporting competition and for home defense. It may not be optimal for all categories, but it works adequately in several areas. Conversely, certain guns serve very little useful purpose in any category other than the one they're in. Heavily modified trap guns make terrible tactical shotguns, while a tactical competition shotgun may not be the best choice when hunting pheasant in South Dakota . The best way to figure out what you're looking for is to pick which uses you plan to do the most, and buy based on whichever gun fills the most categories.







Cost:

How much you are willing to spend will allow you to be able to narrow down which gun you want to buy once you decide what you want to use the gun for. If you have a limited budget of less than $1000, but want a good trap competition gun, you'll be able to rule out purchasing a Browning or Beretta over/under shotgun since those start out in price at well over your $1000 limit. Conversely, if you have lots of money and want a great hunting shotgun, you have the option of buying an economy pump action shotgun like a Mossberg 500 or spending a lot more and getting a new Perazzi over/under for $6000. Most people set a budget for how much they want to spend. It's best to determine a maximum price rather than a set price range. This way, you keep your options open. In some cases, an $800 semi-auto might be the better option than the $2000 over/under. Also take into account how much you will spend on ammunition. Common gauges like 12 and 20 have ammunition readily available and in mass production, so ammunition is usually more varied and less expensive. More uncommon gauges like 16 and 10 are very expensive and also hard to find. Your budget should include ammunition costs. 12 gauge is the most common and inexpensive on the market.







Frequency of Usage:

People who rarely hunt, maybe once per year, have no need for highly custom or limited edition shotguns. If you just want a gun to pick up and shoot when a rare opportunity to hunt arises, you really have no need to buy a $1500 autoloader. A $300 pump shotgun will suffice. Conversely, if you plan on shooting a lot and your better half has been on the verge of filing a missing persons report on you for being gone so much, that $1500 autoloader or $2200 over/under is probably more up your alley as opposed to getting a cheap $150 NEF shotgun. In terms of firearms, you often get what you pay for. Cheaping out can have its consequences in certain categories like autos and double-barrels.





Your Skill Level:

If you're new to the shotgun shooting game, it's advisable that you avoid purchasing complicated firearms that take skill just to operate. This often happens when new shooters decide they want to get an expensive side by side or over/under when they have no shooting skills. They often then believe the gun is bad because they're not good at shooting it. They've basically wasted money. No shotgun shoots the same as a different model. Certain types of shotguns shoot easier than others. Over/unders and side by side shotguns are historically the hardest to get good at shooting. Conversely, pumps are the most simple to operate as long as you remember to pump after each shot. If you're purchasing a shotgun for 10 year old Junior so you can teach him gun safety and shooting, your options might start at a single shot break action shotgun like those offered by NEF or Rossi.



Desired Brands:

If you already know which manufacturer you want to buy from due to previous experience or just out of personal decision, then you can really narrow down which shotgun you want to buy. Companies like Remington, Mossberg, Beretta, Benelli and Browning have their die-hard loyal customer bases. Often times, you may decide to purchase a firearm by a specific company because you trust their products.



Types of Shotguns:


Perhaps you are looking for a type of shotgun. Which type of shotgun you buy will help dictate which brands you have available to purchase from and how much money you will spend. Shotguns are available in pump action, semi-automatic (autoloader), over/under, side by side, single shot break action, bolt action and lever action.

Pump Action: Pump shotguns are the most common and widely owned shotguns in the world. They're great for learning on, but they're also great for the experienced shooter as well. Pump actions have a forend that slides back to cycle rounds. They're particularly good for hunting and field use, but because of different accessories and barrels and ammunition available on the market, the pump action is able to be used in every desired category of usage, from field usage to competition to tactical/combat use. Pump shotguns will usually range in cost from $250 to $500 and are available in countless configurations.
Recommended guns:
Remington 870: Remington has been around for ages and the 870 has been there every step of the way. The Remington 870 has the reputation of being tough as nails and able to take a pounding and keep going. It is the most reliable pump shotgun on the market. You can use it for anything.
Benelli Nova/SuperNova: The Nova and SuperNova are similar shotguns with minor differences, but they have their place. They're heavier than other pump guns, but they're more rugged than most as well. While Benellis are good for many things, they are the preferred gun for goose, duck and other waterfowl hunting due to the polymer construction and 3.5" chamber capability.
Browning BPS: The BPS is probably one of the most beautifully put together pumps on the market. They're aesthetically pleasing and built very well. The BPS loads and ejects rounds through the bottom, making it heavily desired by left-handed shooters. It's a true ambidextrous gun that has a great pedigree.

Semi-Automatic/Autoloader: Most consider the auto to be the natural progression after the pump gun. Autos have higher shooting rates for the average shooter and are more simple to shoot since all you do is pull the trigger. There are two forms of autos: gas-powered and inertia(recoil)-powered. Each has it's own following, and it's as heated of a debate as it gets. Gas powered shotguns use expended combustion gasses from the barrel to cycle the action. They tend to reduce more recoil and cycle more reliably with a myriad of load weights-particularly with light weight loads. Inertia shotguns rely on the rearward energy of the firing cartridge to cycle the action. These shotguns tend to have more felt recoil, but they have fewer operating parts, enhancing reliability. They also cycle faster than gas guns. These shotguns also can be used for every category of usage. There are more versions and special editions of autoloaders than of any other shotgun. From competition models to tactical models, they have great versatility.
Recommendations:
Benelli: Benelli developed the inertia-operated system, and they have made it great. World record holding shooter Tom Knapp shoots a Benelli. His last gun that he just retired had over 400,000 rounds through it and he never had a malfunction. For a long time, Benelli's main focus was on hunting guns. They then took the hunting guns and started creating modified versions for competition shooting and took the shooting sports by storm with inertia power. They were the first company to employ cryo-freezing to metal and to use carbon fiber in stock construction. Several years ago, Benelli created a modified M1 shotgun for tactical use. Now, Benelli sells 6 different tactical shotgun models. In terms of hunting and shooting, Benelli has its competition. When it comes to tactical usage, Benelli owns the autoloading market (Most companies have decided that it's not worth it to even try to compete with Benelli in that market.). Benellis range in cost from $700 to $2000
Remington: Remington has had the gas operated 1100 in production since the 1960s, and several years ago they produced the 11-87 as a replacement. The 11-87 did well, but Remington kept the 1100 around. Now both are very popular. The Remingtons have been able to insert themselves into the economy autoloader bracket by offering low-price versions of the 11-87 that are cheaper than other autoloaders. This has made the 11-87 very accessible. Remington has also gone to lengths to produce competition-grade and show-grade models of their shotguns. Additionally, Remington is one of the few companies that has decided to get into the tactical autoloader market. They're the only company that is considered to be a credibly competitor to Benelli. In competition, Remington is a leader in that market.
Mossberg: Mossbergs are inexpensive and readily available on the market. If you're looking for an ecomony-priced gas shotgun, Mossberg offers the 930 and 935 models. While these have their following, Mossberg has basically grounded itself in the hunting-only market. They have made a run at a couple tactical models, but when compared to Benelli and Remington, they are not a viable option for tactical autoloader production.
Beretta: Beretta shotguns are gas operated and as smooth as glass. They're very durable, very reliable, and have tons of technology in them. Beretta is the parent company to Benelli, but much of the technology that Beretta uses is proprietary to Beretta-only firearms. Beretta markets for the hunting crowd and competition crowd. The AL391 was borne of the AL390, and the 391 has several variants out now, from the Urika 2 to the Teknys, 3901, Xtrema2 to the ultra-complex but amazing UGB and UGB 25 competition guns. Beretta is considered the leader in competition autoloader technology.
Browning: The Browning line of shotguns are all basically the same model, but with different tweaks and treats. The Browning Gold was the standard for years in terms of gas operating hunting guns. Multiple iterations have come out, and Browning has developed several variants for hunting, as well as competition. Browning also serious about it's competition heritage and development. Guns like the Gold, Silver and Maxus are very soft-shooting and have a good heritage. Browning owns Winchester, and the Winchester SuperX2 and new X3 are the same guns as those made under the Browning label.

Over/Under: When you look at over/under shotguns, you have several options. Over/Unders are typically much nicer aesthetically than other types of shotguns due to the heritage behind them. They're a timeless design. Despite timeless design and looks that haven't changed in 60 or 80 years, the technology in most over/unders rivals the technology in todays autoloaders. Over/under shotguns have titanium and various alloy technology built into them, along with choke tubes and other construction that make them durable and reliable. These shotguns are only designed for field use or competition. Many companies have decided to build an over/under shotgun, but no where is it more true that you will get what you pay for. Cheap over/unders will feel junky, awkward and will break easily. High-end guns will be as smooth as glass and tough as diamond-coated nails.
Recommendations:
Beretta: Beretta O/U shotguns are some of the best shotguns you can buy for the money. They range in cost from a very desirable and pleasing $1400 to an amazing $15000. There are field models and competition models abound, and in terms of competition usage, Beretta is probably tied in first place for the competition market. Great field models like the White Onyx and the Ultralight and Silver Pigeon give you a taste the high life of O/U shotguns at a reasonable price, while guns like the 682 and DT10 give you competition capability for a premium. The penultimate guns like the Giubileo (Jubilee) go for $15-20k, and the SO10 can fetch prices of up to $200,000.
Browning: Browning is the other half of the Over/Under competition domination. They produce some amazing shotguns that have various options. The Cynergy is the flagship hunting/field gun for Browning and despite an early production safety recall, it has proven to be a winner. The Citori line is Browning's bread and butter, and is available in several configurations that allow for upland domination or competition rule. Brownings tend to be heavier than other shotguns, but they're certainly just as durable.
Weatherby: Weatherby has been in the shotgun game for a very long time. The Orion and Athena lines have several incarnations. While Weatherby doesn't make as many variations for competition and field usage like other companies, they are very aesthetically pleasing, reliable, and competitively priced with Beretta and Browning.
Exotics: Exotic manufacturers like Perazzi and Rizzini or SKB do some amazing work with their shotguns. You will pay for these guns, but you will get beautiful guns in return.

Side by Side: These shotguns are really only favored for field usage, or some light competition usage in sporting clays or some skeet. The barrels are next to each other instead of being stacked. While most shotguns have a low, mid and high level pricing, Side by Sides typically have a low category and high category. Nothing sits in the middle with these. It's best to avoid any side by side shotgun in the lower price category, as they tend to be poor quality or just plain junk. High end models are gorgeous and often times offer english stock options.
Recommendations:
Beretta: Beretta makes the 471 Silver Hawk, which is a fantastic shotgun. At $3700 MSRP, it's actually about par. Yes, $3700 in the side by side world is considered to be normal. Beretta also has their 1526 collection Imperiale Monte Carlo, but you'll need to shell out about $200k for that one.
Weatherby: Weatherby is a British company, so of course they make side by sides. The Athena and Orion models are also offered in SxS versions in addition to the O/U versions. Again, you'll pay around $3000 to play.
SKB: SKB recently discontinued their SxS shotguns, but if you can find a 385 or 485 still on the shelf, buy it. You'll be happy with it and it'll become a collector's item.

All other types of shotguns are highly specialized, and if you desire to get them, at that point you probably already know everything that I've stated above. This is not a completed all-encompassing article, and if you have questions or complaints, by all means voice them.

If you want to know which models work best, I'm more than willing to discuss specific models or options.

Thanks for reading! :hi:


Coming soon: Rifle Buying 101, Handgun Buying 101, Tactical Rifle Buying 101

GlockMan 08-01-2009 12:59 PM

great job.

keep em coming....

:bow:

TitanSilber ZHP 08-01-2009 02:23 PM

Wow, very informative!

russ330 08-01-2009 02:39 PM

Wow that was one hell of a post. If you want I can give you a sticky at the top of the forum and you can just keep updating that.

Reedo302 08-02-2009 10:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by russ330 (Post 10393998)
Wow that was one hell of a post. If you want I can give you a sticky at the top of the forum and you can just keep updating that.

Yeah, we could do that. I'm planning on doing more of these. It's been slow at work lately, so I just start typing stuff up to pass the time. I'll be doing more of these, so I don't know how many you'll want to sticky, but a few of them may be worth while. The assault weapons one will certainly be one to do whenever I do that one.

russ330 08-03-2009 06:19 PM

Well I can either keep the latest edition 'suck' until you write a new one, or combine each one of them into a single thread. Your choice. :)

Coldintake 08-08-2009 01:40 PM

Fantastic write up as well as a great idea! There are some very knowledgeable people on this forum, posts like this are great..keep em comin!

SLVR JDM 08-14-2009 11:44 AM

Great write up! I'm looking forward to reading subsequent posts along the same line.

BMW4ME 08-15-2009 12:59 PM

Nice write up. Keep 'em coming!

secono330ci 08-15-2009 01:16 PM

Awsome info!

shwagon 08-21-2009 08:01 AM

Thanks for a great post! I used allot of this information in the purchase of my 870 yesterday.

Rush4theYehO 09-26-2009 07:24 PM

Hey Reedo, I'm thinking of picking up either a Mossberg or Remmy 870 pump. Any preference or recommendation? I'll admit that shotguns are NOT my strong point. Everyone needs one though.

Reedo302 09-28-2009 10:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rush4theYehO (Post 10675309)
Hey Reedo, I'm thinking of picking up either a Mossberg or Remmy 870 pump. Any preference or recommendation? I'll admit that shotguns are NOT my strong point. Everyone needs one though.

You'll get people who will stump for both sides. I'm personally a HUGE fan of the Remington 870. Several of my family members, including two of my brothers and my dad, have 870s. They have always had excellent performance from their guns. They are reliable and very well-built. I have two 870's in my car at work. My agency intentionally chose to purchase Remingtons for their reliability. In terms of law enforcement usage and reliability, Remington has always been the superior gun of choice for us.

I once had a Mossberg 500 20ga when I was younger. The gun was good for a while, but then it got dirty and the action started sticking. Then I started having difficulty with the action jamming in place. It was very frustrating and caused me several missed shots. I thought it was just my gun. Then I joined the Army and had to carry a Mossberg M590 shotgun for a little while. That thing was fine for a little bit, but then it started jamming the same way when it got even a little bit dirty. Granted- I only carried it for door breaching, but I have had the gun fail on me in direct combat action. As you can imagine, I have lost all respect and confidence for the Mossberg 500. Really, I can't stand Mossberg as a brand at all.

That said, there are several people in here that swear by their Mossbergs. If any of them have something to say, maybe they can share their experiences. I just have had negative experience after negative experience with Mossberg. I went and bought a Benelli 10 years ago and have never once looked back.

bimmerfan08 12-06-2009 09:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bahnburnerit (Post 10495165)
Thanks for a great post! I used allot of this information in the purchase of my 870 yesterday.

awesome gun

Heyper1 12-08-2009 07:03 AM

Not sure if anyone still checks this thread but I have a few questions. My father in law is a big, big, big time hunter up here in northern NY. My dad was a big hunter as well but for some reason I never got into it. My Wife and I both grew up with guns in the house and miss the feeling of security that comes with it.

Since we have no guns my father in law gave me a Winchester M12 and a Remington 870. He let me know the M12 is a special gun and I started doing reasearch and the thing was made in 1959 (serial number is approx 1,690,000). He gave me that as a sentimental/keepsake thing and somthing he told me to never get rid of. It is a standard gun, 30" barrel, mod choke (stamped on the barrel), with the pistol grip, and black plastic butt plate. The gun is pristine, it has been used but the condition is beautiful. He used to use it 15 years ago, but now that you need to use steel shot for ducks he did not want to risk running steel shot thru that barrel. He too uses Binelli's for hunting now. Any idea how much one of these is worth? Barrel is still blue'd and the action works perfectly.

He gave me the Remi 870 for home protection and it is now sitting next to my bed and the shells between my mattress.

We must have fired 100 shells this weekend so I could get comfortable with the gun.

The Remi has seen lots of field time over the years, but is still in good condition. It has a stupid scope mount that clamps over the gun that I started to remove, but the two pins that slide thru the action/trigger assembly are aftermarket to accept the added width of the scope mount. Any idea where I can get new pins so the scope mount can come off?

Any help and or information is really appreciated.

This whole situation with my father-in-law is interesting, we have lots in common and he loves me, but he has talked to me more about these guns than anything else ever in the 7 years I have been dating/married to his daughter.

Reedo302 12-08-2009 10:42 PM

I couldn't tell you how much the M12 is off-hand. I'm in the process of moving, and the Blue Book of Gun Values is MIA. I would recommend going to a sporting goods store and asking someone-preferably an old-timer or a gunsmith. The old Model 12s that I've previously seen have really not been all that valuable. Shotguns don't really command much value unless they're from the 1800's to the early 1900s (usually pre-WW2). Winchester rifles have always held a good value, but their used pump shotguns not so much. The average I've seen used pumps from the 50's and 60's go for is in the $200-400 range (retail pricing). The old Remington Wingmasters are usually the most sought-after and highest value. But again, if you're looking for a good price, look in the Blue Book.


As for the Remington, you can get those retaining pins at most major outdoors retailers or gun shops like Gander Mountain, Bass Pro Shops or Cabelas. Other places to look are smaller gun shops that have a gunsmith.
Otherwise, go to http://www.brownells.com/ and order them online. Brownells is awesome.

Heyper1 12-10-2009 07:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Reedo302 (Post 11008243)
I couldn't tell you how much the M12 is off-hand. I'm in the process of moving, and the Blue Book of Gun Values is MIA. I would recommend going to a sporting goods store and asking someone-preferably an old-timer or a gunsmith. The old Model 12s that I've previously seen have really not been all that valuable. Shotguns don't really command much value unless they're from the 1800's to the early 1900s (usually pre-WW2). Winchester rifles have always held a good value, but their used pump shotguns not so much. The average I've seen used pumps from the 50's and 60's go for is in the $200-400 range (retail pricing). The old Remington Wingmasters are usually the most sought-after and highest value. But again, if you're looking for a good price, look in the Blue Book.


As for the Remington, you can get those retaining pins at most major outdoors retailers or gun shops like Gander Mountain, Bass Pro Shops or Cabelas. Other places to look are smaller gun shops that have a gunsmith.
Otherwise, go to http://www.brownells.com/ and order them online. Brownells is awesome.

Thanks for the help, it is greatly appreciated

Looks like a trip to gander mountain is in order for the weekend.

bimmerfan08 03-15-2010 09:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Heyper1 (Post 11003939)
Not sure if anyone still checks this thread but I have a few questions. My father in law is a big, big, big time hunter up here in northern NY. My dad was a big hunter as well but for some reason I never got into it. My Wife and I both grew up with guns in the house and miss the feeling of security that comes with it.

Since we have no guns my father in law gave me a Winchester M12 and a Remington 870. He let me know the M12 is a special gun and I started doing reasearch and the thing was made in 1959 (serial number is approx 1,690,000). He gave me that as a sentimental/keepsake thing and somthing he told me to never get rid of. It is a standard gun, 30" barrel, mod choke (stamped on the barrel), with the pistol grip, and black plastic butt plate. The gun is pristine, it has been used but the condition is beautiful. He used to use it 15 years ago, but now that you need to use steel shot for ducks he did not want to risk running steel shot thru that barrel. He too uses Binelli's for hunting now. Any idea how much one of these is worth? Barrel is still blue'd and the action works perfectly.

He gave me the Remi 870 for home protection and it is now sitting next to my bed and the shells between my mattress.

We must have fired 100 shells this weekend so I could get comfortable with the gun.

The Remi has seen lots of field time over the years, but is still in good condition. It has a stupid scope mount that clamps over the gun that I started to remove, but the two pins that slide thru the action/trigger assembly are aftermarket to accept the added width of the scope mount. Any idea where I can get new pins so the scope mount can come off?

Any help and or information is really appreciated.

This whole situation with my father-in-law is interesting, we have lots in common and he loves me, but he has talked to me more about these guns than anything else ever in the 7 years I have been dating/married to his daughter.

:hi: Im from syracuse and still go up there every other year to rabbit hunt in upstate NY with my uncle. He does a ton of hunting up that way

Adam@Euro-Spec 05-06-2010 11:56 AM

Awesome write up. Thanks and thanks for the PM reply the other day. Shot the benelli autoloader last night and it was light and awesome. I love trap shooting but feel its going to be an expensive hobby haha. I have been shooting an over under huglo and can't decide if I like the ou or autoloading more. Both are amazing guns.

Reedo302 05-07-2010 09:09 PM

Glad to help. I love talking guns. It's hard to beat a Benelli. I was the first person I knew to own a Benelli. Now several of my family members own them. They lose the ability to shoot the really light loads that the Remington 1100 can shoot, but you have a much more reliable and simplistic operating system with the Benelli.

O/U guns will give you much more options in terms of sporting clays, trap and skeet. There are many more models, lots of special options, and for them, the sky is the limit. In terms of trap/skeet guns, Browning and Beretta are the kings of the modern market. They produce many variations on the popular models, and there's always a model in every price range. Brownings are actually the most popular O/U competition shotguns that I've seen, but I always have to pull for my Italians. I have a Beretta that I've been eying up for a while.

Next shotguns to buy (can't decide):
Beretta 687 Ultralight 12ga
Beretta 687 Silver Pigeon 12ga
Benelli UltraLight 12ga
Benelli Performance Shop SuperSport 12ga.


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