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yousharenow 08-21-2012 09:32 AM

Differential Equations
 
What should I brush up on for this class? Smells like a lot of Cal2 and heavy integration. This is my last math class required, and I took Cal2 a year ago so I'm bit rusty on it..just want to see what others thought of the course.

k2spitfire 08-21-2012 09:44 AM

it ramps up, so if you didn't pay someone to pass your calc finals, it'll come back to you.

cowmoo32 08-21-2012 09:53 AM

I'm in the same boat, but I took calc III 5 years ago, so this should be fun.

edit: I'm still surprised you don't have to take linear algebra for EE

VaderDave 08-21-2012 10:12 AM

I have heard of these "differential equations" of which you speak. :eek:

yousharenow 08-21-2012 10:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k2spitfire (Post 14668323)
it ramps up, so if you didn't pay someone to pass your calc finals, it'll come back to you.

I was decent at Calc2, got out with a B but its been a year since I've done some of the heavy integration. Just trying to get a feel for what to expect outta the course.

Alanz0 08-21-2012 10:17 AM

It's not bad at all, had it two semesters ago. Although, my professor was terrible and I taught myself. More derivatives than anything. LaPlace transformation is what stumped me the most. Watch YouTube videos on it as well, helped alot

k2spitfire 08-21-2012 10:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yousharenow (Post 14668391)
I was decent at Calc2, got out with a B but its been a year since I've done some of the heavy integration. Just trying to get a feel for what to expect outta the course.

iirc, heavy integration is in multivariable calc. differential equations is a lot of derivatives f'(x) f''(x) f'''(x) etc

cowmoo32 08-21-2012 10:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k2spitfire (Post 14668398)
iirc, heavy integration is in multivariable calc. differential equations is a lot of derivatives f'(x) f''(x) f'''(x) etc

Yup. Calc III is a breeze, literally calc I integrations in 3D. I've been working diff eq problems off an on all summer to get ready and have done zero integration.

yousharenow 08-21-2012 10:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k2spitfire (Post 14668398)
iirc, heavy integration is in multivariable calc. differential equations is a lot of derivatives f'(x) f''(x) f'''(x) etc

We really didn't do a lot of Multivarible integration in Calc3. It was mainly applications. That's why Cal2 is a prerequisite for DiffEQ, not Cal3.

Cal2 IS integral calculus so thats where you see most of it

Mike Larry 08-21-2012 10:25 AM

i dont have any tips, but i just wanna say that this class came within an inch of ending my engineering career back in college. i think residual post-traumatic stress from this class is what finally pushed me to go to law school and leave all this behind :eek:

yousharenow 08-21-2012 10:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mike Larry (Post 14668422)
i dont have any tips, but i just wanna say that this class came within an inch of ending my engineering career back in college. i think residual post-traumatic stress from this class is what finally pushed me to go to law school and leave all this behind :eek:

Meh, its my last math class for an EE. The great thing about engineering degrees is if you can survive the math, the rest isn't so bad.

FlzRider 08-21-2012 10:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cowmoo32 (Post 14668340)
I'm in the same boat, but I took calc III 5 years ago, so this should be fun.

edit: I'm still surprised you don't have to take linear algebra for EE

5 years ago?! How long have you been an engineering student? :eek:

cowmoo32 08-21-2012 10:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FlzRider (Post 14668473)
5 years ago?! How long have you been an engineering student? :eek:

I graduated 2 years ago, just started toward another degree last week

yousharenow 08-21-2012 10:56 AM

I think Engineers and Math majors are the only ones required to take this nonsense

k2spitfire 08-21-2012 10:58 AM

a little ot, but if you have the time, check out discrete math... that starts knocking on some good will hunting sh1t

cowmoo32 08-21-2012 11:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yousharenow (Post 14668515)
I think Engineers and Math majors are the only ones required to take this nonsense

Physics and certain finance majors too

FlzRider 08-21-2012 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cowmoo32 (Post 14668492)
I graduated 2 years ago, just started toward another degree last week

Nice. Which one?

dreamdrivedrift 08-21-2012 12:55 PM

Took it last semester, after not having taken math for 3 years. It wasn't so bad. Brush up on integration by parts and partial fractions. Otherwise it's pretty straightforward as long as you put the time into understanding the concepts.

k2pilot 08-21-2012 01:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cowmoo32 (Post 14668340)
I'm in the same boat, but I took calc III 5 years ago, so this should be fun.

edit: I'm still surprised you don't have to take linear algebra for EE

It's the Comp Sci guys that really use linear algebra.

m_guimont 08-21-2012 02:05 PM

Laplace transforms will haunt my dreams forever. Know your linear algebra and calc 2 well and you wont have any issues. Very heavy on the integration.


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