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-   -   Another brake thread (http://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=943577)

PrecisionX 09-09-2012 09:58 AM

Another brake thread
 
Ok so as you all know I posted a thread about a braking issue. I'm thinking it's time to take care of this, the car brakes nicely under daily city driving but anything higher speed it's not smooth.

I'm thinking of front and rear pads and new rotors.

Pads: I get a ton of brake dust now and it's annoying, style 68s are
Not easy to clean either. This is going to be a spirited driving daily with occasional autox days.

Rotors: not sure what to do here, I hear slotted an drilled, slotted and or drilled but am not sure which to go with and why/why not.

Lines and fluid: are stainless steel lines going to help my car brake better? Are they easy to replace? This will be my first brake DIY

I want the best bang for the buck braking performance without a BBK

I've been warned that certain pads and rotor combinations will actually brake worse unless you are slamming on your brakes to get them to
Bite but whatever help would be nice as well as vendors and pricing.

Sansho 09-09-2012 10:41 PM

I would not get drilled rotors, as they are prone to crack (and in fairness, all rotors with holes will crack at some point). Some holey rotors have the holes cast in when they are made, and that type will last longer. Drilling holes in a rotor adds all sorts of stresses, and the rotor will have a shorter life than a rotor with cast in holes.

Slotted rotors are meant to give gasses and water a way to get out from between the face of the brake pad and the rotor. I happen to like ATE Premium One rotors, that have a slotted pattern built into the rotor. When the slotting is gone, it's time to replace the rotor. They look like this:

http://www.tirerack.com/images/brake...mOne_rotor.jpg

Stainless lines will give you a little better pedal feel, as there's no rubber to expand. If you want to go this way, look for lines that are German TUV approved. I've always been a little wary of lines that say they are built to meet certain standards, but aren't certified. (I use standard rubber factory lines, and replace them after 10 years).

On both track and street, I've used ATE Typ 200, which is the same as ATE Super Blue, without the dye. I've found that the blue dye can dye white plastic brake fluid reservoirs, over time. The gold-colored ATE Typ 200 won't do that. Some people like to alternate them. If you want the specs, they are here.

For pads, you can spend hours and hours reading, as everyone has opinions and experiences. While I use stock pads for street usage, the next step I'd go to for more performance would be Performance Friction Z-rated pads.

tock172 09-10-2012 01:38 AM

This issue has been discussed ad nauseam here. You can find everything you need to know through searching, but since you decided to make a new thread, here is what you need to know:

1. You don't need drilled/slotted/whatever rotors. Regular, 'blank' rotors work perfectly.
2. Pads are a tradeoff. Less dust = less initial bite (and some claim a longer braking distance, some people mind, some don't).
3. You probably don't need brake lines, but new brake fluid followed by a bleeding of the system is recommended.

Safe choices for pads/rotors: Ate, Textar, Jurid, Pagid, Genuine BMW, Zimmermann, Brembo, Balo, etc.

PrecisionX 09-10-2012 06:46 AM

It seems that it's an almost can't lose situation with minor trade offs to any combination. Those rotors are pretty interesting, where do you get them? Also what are some good sites for the best pricing?

Sansho 09-10-2012 07:47 AM

One source for ATE rotors is through Tire Rack. namotorsports has pretty good prices, but inventory is spotty.

PrecisionX 09-10-2012 08:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sansho (Post 14719098)
One source for ATE rotors is through Tire Rack. namotorsports has pretty good prices, but inventory is spotty.

What are your thoughts on that rotor compared to your options? Seems kind of trendy?

Sansho 09-10-2012 10:55 AM

Don't know about trendy. I've used them since mid-90's on Porsche 911 and e46. Perhaps subjectively, I feel better initial bite and control during the rain than with normal rotors. I don't know that most people, outside of track and maybe autox use, will use their brakes hard enough to benefit from slots relieving gases between the face of the pad and the rotor.

PrecisionX 09-10-2012 11:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sansho (Post 14719395)
Don't know about trendy. I've used them since mid-90's on Porsche 911 and e46. Perhaps subjectively, I feel better initial bite and control during the rain than with normal rotors. I don't know that most people, outside of track and maybe autox use, will use their brakes hard enough to benefit from slots relieving gases between the face of the pad and the rotor.

After reading some more I will not be touching drilled rotors, slotted for sure but no holes. I meant the star pattern slotted rotors.

nleksan 09-10-2012 01:53 PM

I have used the StopTech Stage 2 brake upgrade kit on my 328Ci (before BBK) and also 325i, both of which were the slotted rotor option and StopTech ST pads. The kit also comes with SS Braided lines and Motul RBF600 fluid. I find the kit to be excellent for street driving, and even okay for moderate track (i.e. autocross) use, and I don't have a single complaint about the kit. The rotors are high quality and I didn't notice a single imperfection on any of the 8 total rotors, and the slots don't go all the way to the edge which is the ideal way to do it. The Stoptech ST pads are excellent for street driving, have less dust than OE pads while providing better "bite" under all but the most extreme low temps (think -5C or below). The pedal feel is enhanced and is much more linear, in my opinion, and is extremely consistent.

What I would recommend adding to the kit to make it perfect would be:
- Brass Caliper Bushing/Guide Kit as it really does improve the consistency and feel of the brakes, and are the perfect complement to new stainless steel braided lines; also improves pad life and results in perfectly even wear
- Stainless Steel Brake Rotor Screws to prevent rust and seizing (325i has put 25k miles on them and they still look brand new)
- Replace the Brake Line Clips as you will have to remove them anyway, and they are all of 99 cents a piece


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