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-   -   Is this brake combination a good one? (http://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=943961)

PrecisionX 09-11-2012 08:47 AM

Is this brake combination a good one?
 
I was considering a front/rear brake package from ecstuning or turner but I wasn't thrilled with them and people say to stay away from kits.

My car has 56k on it and is a 330Ci Auto Sport


What do you think of this combination for daily and track use?

Rotors: ATE Premium One Slotted
Pads: StopTech Sport Pads (I don't think they are ceramic, maybe composite)
Lines: Stainless (not sure which ones)
Fluid: ATE Super blue

Am I missing anything? I'd be buying from different sites

ac_2007 09-11-2012 09:01 AM

1) Don't get slotted, other than that, ATE premium one's are very good discs with an unbeatable warranty.
2) Pads are okay, but not the best.
3) You don't need this. Just more work/brake bleeding
4) Doesn't matter, as long as it meets OE spec.


That said, I would suggest you just get Brembo discs, and Textar/Pagid/Jurid pads.
Nothing beats OE pads in terms of braking, but yes there will be plenty of brake dust.

Stay far far away from any slotted or cross drilled rotors. There are purely for looks, and your car will actually brake worse.

PrecisionX 09-11-2012 09:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ac_2007 (Post 14721957)
1) Don't get slotted, other than that, ATE premium one's are very good discs with an unbeatable warranty.
2) Pads are okay, but not the best.
3) You don't need this. Just more work/brake bleeding
4) Doesn't matter, as long as it meets OE spec.


That said, I would suggest you just get Brembo discs, and Textar/Pagid/Jurid pads.
Nothing beats OE pads in terms of braking, but yes there will be plenty of brake dust.

Stay far far away from any slotted or cross drilled rotors. There are purely for looks, and your car will actually brake worse.

Maybe I'm wrong about the pads but I'm pretty sure I'm not wrong about the slotted rotors (not drilled). Stainless lines drastically improve pedal feel I'm told and never need to be replaced.

WDE46 09-11-2012 09:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PrecisionX (Post 14721968)
Maybe I'm wrong about the pads but I'm pretty sure I'm not wrong about the slotted rotors (not drilled). Stainless lines drastically improve pedal feel I'm told and never need to be replaced.

Slotted rotors for street use are not necessary. The purpose of the slots is to allow gas to be expelled from under the pad, thus keeping the pad in contact with the rotor. Modern street pads don't produce much gas, if any, and the missing contact area of the slots outweighs the benefits of gas removal. You shouldn't ever be getting the brakes hot enough on the street to generate gas anway.

ac_2007 09-11-2012 09:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PrecisionX (Post 14721968)
Maybe I'm wrong about the pads but I'm pretty sure I'm not wrong about the slotted rotors (not drilled). Stainless lines drastically improve pedal feel I'm told and never need to be replaced.

Sure, if you already have a mushy pedal and the mechanic has to bleed your system, its not a bad time to swap over stainless lines. There are plenty of people with 200k+ on their cars still using original lines with excellent pedal feel. If its your perogative to upgrade, go to town. To me it seems like an unecessary added cost.

Slotted rotors have less contact surface with your brake pad, why would you want this? The promise of extra heat dissipation MIGHT be applicable on the track, after prolonged lapping. For your daily drive, when you brake hard you will feel vibration through the pedal, the steering, and have added noise.

I've ran the same ATE PO slotted rotors on multiple heavy (4000lbs+) cars before switching back to blanks. Now I'm happier.

PrecisionX 09-11-2012 09:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WDE46 (Post 14722020)
Slotted rotors for street use are not necessary. The purpose of the slots is to allow gas to be expelled from under the pad, thus keeping the pad in contact with the rotor. Modern street pads don't produce much gas, if any, and the missing contact area of the slots outweighs the benefits of gas removal. You shouldn't ever be getting the brakes hot enough on the street to generate gas anway.

I drive very spirited daily, that's even an understatement. The car will be tracked as well and as far as I knew the slots are not only for gasses but to expel debris and water as well.

WDE46 09-11-2012 01:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PrecisionX (Post 14722032)
I drive very spirited daily, that's even an understatement. The car will be tracked as well and as far as I knew the slots are not only for gasses but to expel debris and water as well.

That sounds fairly reasonable except I don't think I've ever had a problem with debris in any of my car's brakes. Water may make some sense except on warm brakes water vaporizes instantly and in the rain it gets slung off via centripetal force (most of it). That's not to say rotors aren't affected by rain, because I have definitely noticed it on my cars. In fact Cadillac used to (and may still) implement a system that would move the brake pads to within a few thousnadths of an inch of the rotor in the rain to sweep the water off. I feel like the slots would trap more water if anything, but thats just a guess.


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