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-   -   Best way to cook a ribeye steak, in the city? (http://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=955394)

dauble2k5 11-11-2012 01:36 PM

Best way to cook a ribeye steak, in the city?
 
As the title states, I've got a few ribeye steaks and am wondering the best way to cook them. I live in the city, so don't have a balcony or a way to grill them, other than a George Foreman.

What do you guys do? Bake, broil, fry..? Use the oven or the stove? I have some stellar steak seasoning, but am thinking about marinating them for an hour or two in a bit of hot sauce and A1.

dreamdrivedrift 11-11-2012 09:22 PM

I usually "marinate" it in olive oil, and just sprinkle salt and pepper on top. Sear it in a very hot pan for a couple minutes each side, and stick it in the oven to finish.

Cast iron pan would probably be best, if you have one.

dauble2k5 11-12-2012 11:06 AM

Hm. I ended up using the George Foreman for five minutes.. turned out perfectly. I'll have to try this next.

accolade 11-13-2012 10:06 AM

I'm going to put this in here and refer back to it when it comes up in threads. It's a long read, but it should really clear a few things up and hopefully help:

Whether cooking a Ia plancha or in a frying pan, people usually cook food on one side and then, about halfway through, flip it over to finish cooking it from the other side. The assumption is that this will cook the food more evenly from edge to edge. But is it the best approach?

No! A single flip cooks the food neither fastest nor most evenly. It just takes less thought. Food flipped twice will cook with greater uniformity; flip it four times for more even cooking still; and so on. Surprisingly, the more you flip, the faster the food cooks, too. Food science writer Harold McGee discovered these flipping effects, and we have verified them (see next page).

Uneven cooking happens whenever there is a gradient between the surface temperature of the food and the temperature at its core. The bigger the difference between these temperatures, the more uneven the cooking is. When food is cooked in a pan or on a griddle at 300 c / 572 p, the layers just below the surface of the food quickly reach the boiling point of water, even as the core remains much cooler. The temperature of the food surface rises the boiling point and stays there until the food dehydrates and browns. If you cook it for too long, the dry crust eventually burns.

Typically, the cook flips the food over before that can happen. Unfortunately, by that time, much of the food beneath the surface has been overcooked. Yet the core of the food is still undercooked. That's why you have to continue cooking the other side for nearly as long again.

While the flipped food cooks on its back side, the just-cooked surface temperature starts to cool down. Three mechanisms are at work simultaneously. First, some of the built-up heat at and near the surface diffuses through conduction toward the center of the food. Second, the hot later at the surface evaporates as steam. Finally, some of the built-up surface heat slowly convects away into the relatively cooler air of the k kitchen. The total effect is to cool the cooked surface and heat the core.

Because the heat doesn't brake to an immediate stop but keeps on rolling toward the center, experienced cooks know to pull food from the
griddle just before it's perfectly done. They then allow time for the residual heat to sink in, a process called resting. But how do you know exactly when to remove the food? Predicting how much the core temperature will rise during resting is difficult. Usually, cooks build up an intuition for the timing during years of trial and error.

Fortunately, there is an alternative approach that, although more laborious, is more likely to succeed for most cooks: frequent flipping. The more often you flip the food, the less time it spends against the griddle, and the less time the heat has to build up below the surface of the food. The result is that the overcooked layer is minimized, and more of the center is done just right.

In essence, constant flipping reduces the size of the swings that the surface temperature takes as the food surface alternates between cooking and cooling. It also lowers the average temperature of the surface, which means that, edge to edge, the food ends up more evenly cooked.

This effect shouldn't be too surprising. Most of us intuitively understand that rotating a roast on a spit helps cook the roast more evenly. Flipping food back and forth creates pulses of heat that produce very much the same result-both a golden crust and an evenly cooked interior.

Repeated flipping also speeds the cooking a bit because, in much the same way that it minimizes how much excessive heat builds up on the cooking side, it also reduces the amount of cooling that occurs on the resting side. Flip too frequently, however, and you'll get diminishing returns.

How often, then, should you flip? There is no single optimum, but somewhere in the range of once every 15-30 seconds seems reasonable.

Give it a try, and you'll discover the advantage of this unorthodox approach. Because the surface and core temperatures of the food never get very far apart, the interior temperature rises just a few degrees during resting. It thus becomes easier to estimate when to stop cooking, and timing things just right becomes less critical.

HaloArchive 11-13-2012 10:10 AM

Best marinade yet that I have done ...

soy sauce, squished garlic, chopped red onion, balsamic vinegar. mix meat with marinade, put in bag and put in fridge over night.

When you cook the meat, it is very tender. Amazing.

JJR4884 11-13-2012 10:22 AM

Per Accolade's post. I have been using this method ever since I stopped finishing steaks in the oven. I will say one thing, I will turn them more than once, but I will always wait until the steak had a decent sear on it. That "overcooked" part of the steak is the most flavorful part if seasoned properly and not burned to hell.

If you want to cook a perfect, simple steak, follow these steps below.

- Steak should be thawed out either in your fridge, or in cold water. Take it out and let it sit at room temp for an hour or so. Bring it to room temp basically.
- Season the steak liberally with salt (and pepper if you prefer) 5-10 minutes before you cook it
- Stainless or cast iron (preferred) should be hot, but I would be careful. Don't blast the stove, especially if it is electric. 2/3rds on the dial should be good and safe.
- Pour some oil on the steaks when they are ready to go on the pan. Place on pan, and press the top of the steak firmly to get most of the steak to make good contact with the pan. (do not use olive oil, EVOO, etc. You want to use either veggie/corn/canola oil, or if you can, get walnut/grapeseed/peanut oil. They will not burn until 400-450 degrees, where EVOO is like, 275 degree. If the oil burns, your steak will taste like sh*t)
- Turn the steak after a solid 2 minutes, make sure it comes off easy. If it sticks, don't yank it off, give it a little more time.
- Cook for another 2 minutes, check the crust on it, make sure it looks a nice golden brown but not burned.
- Flip as necessary like Accolade mentioned. Don't be afraid to hit the sides of the steak as well for 30 sec each
- Take steak of when you feel is done, and place it on an elevated surface. I usually make a "doughnut" out of aluminum foil and place the steak on that. This will preserve the crust on the bottom, rather than letting the steak sit in its own juices and soften up the bottom crust.
- A touch more salt and some pepper can be added, then tent the steak and let it rest for 5 minutes.
- Serve

accolade 11-13-2012 10:41 AM

Oh I forgot to say... Just to give some validity to the quote, it is from this book:

http://www.amazon.com/Modernist-Cuis...ernist+cuisine

Here is the second half of that:

http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h7...d/flipping.jpg

sfcjetjr 11-16-2012 06:49 PM

Season with salt and pepper of course. Place on broiler pan. Set broiler to hi. Place pan in oven with meat 8" or so from broiler. Cook on 1st side up for 5 minutes, flip and cook for 3 minutes, the next 2 minutes place some chopped green peppers, thin sliced onions so they brown a bit, and top with fresh slices of mushrooms. Rest for 1-2 minutes. Juices from bottom of broiler pan, drizzle over meat and vegi's. Drizzle not drown! Then eat it like a Neanderthal!

chivo328 11-18-2012 11:53 PM

I love the stove top/oven method, so easy you have to practicaly TRY and screw it up.

1. As previously mentioned, let the steaks come up to room temp. Very important.

2. Place your pan (preferably cast iron, wrap handle with foil if wood) in oven, turn oven on to preheat to 500 deg.F. Your pan will heat up along with the oven.

3. As your oven and pan preheat dry steaks and season VERY liberaly. I use kosher salt, fresh ground black pepper, garlic powder, and onion salt. Then I coat the steaks with olive oil, yes olive oil. Trust me, it will be fine.

4. As soon as oven comes up to temperature remove pan to stove top over a burner on HIGH. Leave the oven on set to 500F. Place steaks in pan 30 to 60 seconds (as Surrey pointed out the meat should release with a really nice crust) flip, cook another 30 to 60 seconds.

5. Place the pan and steaks back into the oven. Cook two minutes flip steaks, cook another 2 minutes. I use these times to cook about a 1.5 inch ribeye to rare. Add about a minute and a half each side for medium rare.

6. Remove and lest rest.

7. Bon profit!

dauble2k5 11-19-2012 10:26 PM

Hmm.. these are all really interesting ideas. I've broiled and have tried searing them a couple of times, all to no such luck. Do you guys ever throw a steak on a George Foreman frozen? Somewhere I heard that throwing a frozen steak directly onto a hot grill, or into the oven to broil is better than letting it thaw out. Is this true? I've tried both ways and haven't really noticed much difference. Usually, I'll buy it at the grocery store, then cook it within a day or two.

JJR4884 11-21-2012 03:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dauble2k5 (Post 14913862)
Hmm.. these are all really interesting ideas. I've broiled and have tried searing them a couple of times, all to no such luck. Do you guys ever throw a steak on a George Foreman frozen? Somewhere I heard that throwing a frozen steak directly onto a hot grill, or into the oven to broil is better than letting it thaw out. Is this true? I've tried both ways and haven't really noticed much difference. Usually, I'll buy it at the grocery store, then cook it within a day or two.

No offense, but hell no.

Steak should be room temp when you cook it. If it is frozen in the middle, the outside will be charred to coal by the time the middle just thaws out.

Youtube will be your friend, watch some videos. A hot pan, a thawed out (preferably room temp) steak, and salt, is all that you need to make a good steak.

Big Rick 11-21-2012 03:55 PM

Start heating your cast iron skillet for about 10 minutes on high.... Skillet should be bare! Get yourself some Paul Prudhomme's Blacked Redfish Magic... Melt a pat of butter... Spoon some on one side of the steak and apply Blackened Redfish Magic liberally.... Then the opposite side. With your cast iron skillet WAY Hot... Drop in the steak. Time it per your liking... But only flip it ONCE!

This produces HUGE volumes of white smoke... So disable your smoke detectors or take a hot plate outside! I've done it inside before but only when I was out of gas on the grill and desperate!

The flavor of the steak cannot be beat unless you flame grill!

JJR4884 11-23-2012 10:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Big Rick (Post 14918060)
Start heating your cast iron skillet for about 10 minutes on high.... Skillet should be bare! Get yourself some Paul Prudhomme's Blacked Redfish Magic... Melt a pat of butter... Spoon some on one side of the steak and apply Blackened Redfish Magic liberally.... Then the opposite side. With your cast iron skillet WAY Hot... Drop in the steak. Time it per your liking... But only flip it ONCE!

This produces HUGE volumes of white smoke... So disable your smoke detectors or take a hot plate outside! I've done it inside before but only when I was out of gas on the grill and desperate!

The flavor of the steak cannot be beat unless you flame grill!

Please don't take any offense to this at all, but this doesn't sound like a good idea. Butter should be added at the end of the steak cooking because it will burn, especially if you spend 10 minutes heating the hell out of that cast iron skillet. That pan should be up to temp in a matter of minutes, not 10.

All of that white smoke you see is smoke from the cream in the butter burning, which will not leave a good taste on anything. Use a high temp oil, coat the outside of the steak, and slap that on the pan. Then drop a tablespoon or two of butter in the pan at the last minute or two that way the steak can finish in there, and you can spoon the melted over the steak.

See here

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26nB2l33R_Q

iwannagofast 11-24-2012 02:37 PM

Is this a troll thread?

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Bimmer App

makecopies 05-06-2013 10:01 AM

Go to Teds Montana Grill order ribeye and relax!


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