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-   -   ECS tuning slotted rotors. (http://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=957655)

717bimmerboym3 11-24-2012 10:10 PM

ECS tuning slotted rotors.
 
So I bought ecs tuning slotted rotors for my 330xi, that my wife drives, and after four months they warped already. Has anyone else had better outcomes with theses rotors? I sent an email to customer service and they replied back asking if I could take a pick.

trippmann 11-24-2012 10:15 PM

Guess your best bet is to use a straight edge on it

Sent from my DROIDX using Bimmer App

tomoyer 11-25-2012 08:21 AM

Usually only 2 reasons that rotors warp; either the lugs are too tight and not evenly torqued OR you have a brake caliper piston hanging up and creating too much heat on the rotor. A bad wheel bearing can also cause, but usually you will hear them.
Wheel lugs should be put on by hand, hand tightened with a torque wrench.
A caliper piston that is hanging up should show signs of heat discoloration (especially if you have painted the calipers).

717bimmerboym3 11-25-2012 10:31 AM

I do hand torque my lugs because i learned my lesson on the last pair of rotors i used a torque stick on a impact. I need to check the calipers and look for some discoloration. As for a wheel bearing the only one that sounds noisy is the LR, but who knows i could fix that one and have a bad one in the front that i couldn't hear over the rear one.

Kubica 11-25-2012 11:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tomoyer (Post 14924691)
Usually only 2 reasons that rotors warp; either the lugs are too tight and not evenly torqued OR you have a brake caliper piston hanging up and creating too much heat on the rotor. A bad wheel bearing can also cause, but usually you will hear them.
Wheel lugs should be put on by hand, hand tightened with a torque wrench.
A caliper piston that is hanging up should show signs of heat discoloration (especially if you have painted the calipers).

Two more causes of warped rotors: 1) driving through cold puddles with hot brakes and 2) poor manufacturing/quality control processes (aka buying cheap rotors).

It's really tough to beat the quality/performance/price of Genuine BMW rotors. You can get two out of three in an aftermarket rotor, but genuine really is best short of going with a nice BBK.

717bimmerboym3 11-25-2012 04:21 PM

I plan on replacing the fronts with oem blanks and akebono pads after christmas. That seems to be what everyone else says is the best route as well.

Pierce1 11-25-2012 04:25 PM

Are they warped? Or are you experiencing some differential in friction on the rotor?

tomoyer 11-25-2012 07:39 PM

Kubica, they would have to be extremely hot rotors to warp when going thru a puddle, or else we better stop driving our cars in the rain, seeing that water from the road is kicked up onto the rotors all the time when driving thru the rain.
717bimmerboym3, have you checked the rotor run-out with a dial indicator? It will quickly tell you if one or both (if we are talking about the fronts) have excessive run-out, i. e. warped. When you but these new rotors on, since you said that you torqued the lugs, did you change the pads when you installed the new rotors? Did you clean and lube the caliper guide pins? Did you apply never-seize compound on the pad backing plates where they contact the caliper frames? Did you use disc brake quiet to glue the pads? Did you bed the pads into the rotors?
Kubica, said it before, and will repeat again, I've used ATE and R1 Concepts Cross-Drilled Rotors for years with NO problems what so ever, and that included re-surfacing them when new pads were installed until they were down to the minimum thickness. OEM BMW rotors are not the only way to go, but then to each their on. As far as pads go, I've used Padig, Metal Masters and R1 Concepts Ceramic pads, all with good stopping power in all conditions, a bit more dusting from the Padigs than from the Metal Masters or Ceramic Pads, but again, to each their own since many here don't mind the dust and swear by the OEM BMW pads which are prone to fad when used hard in spirited driving.

Pierce1 11-25-2012 08:37 PM

Perhaps they are not bedded in.

717bimmerboym3 11-25-2012 09:03 PM

Yes I have bedded the pads into the rotors and put anti seize on all the proper areas where needed. However i did not use brake pad adhesive. I did also jack my car up and took LF wheel off and held a screwdriver on the caliper mounting bracket and it did touch and not touchas the rotor spun. I'm going to get my buddy to turn them and see what happens after that. Thanks tomoyer for all the info on pads and discs you had good outcomes with, it gives me some more options when i do have to replace everything.

tomoyer 11-26-2012 04:15 PM

Contrary to what some will post here, OEM BMW front rotors have ALWAYS been prone to warping (some inexpensive aftermarket ones as well). With quality aftermarket slotted, cross drilled and/or cross drilled and slotted rotors (my preference is just cross drilled) and complete proper installation of rotors, pads and bedding the pads into the rotors and proper wheel lug stud torque, the warping issue is greatly (if not completely) resolved plus you will have even better braking, can have less pad dusting on the wheels without going the real expensive route of a big brake kit (which usually means you need to purchase larger wheels for the clearance). To clean the guide pins you can either use a scotch brite pad or 4 0 steel wool, quality grease to lube them before installing (you can even go for the brass guide pin bushings which can give a better pedal feel, though they need to be well lubed and kept lubed). Blue Loktite on the threads of the caliper holder when reinstalling and both bolts torqued to spec. The never-seize on all parts of the pads where they contact the caliper holder so that they don't bind (clean the caliper holder well first using a wire brush) and disc brake quiet on the pad plates to glue them to the caliper holder (the outer pad) and to the piston (the inner pad). All parts should be well cleaned after taking apart and before putting back together. Bleed the brakes using the 2 person method, keeping the master cylinder full (use ATE Super Blue brake fluid).


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