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-   -   The #1 Career Mistake Capable People Make (http://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=967115)

bimmerfan08 01-22-2013 07:29 PM

The #1 Career Mistake Capable People Make
 
I recently reviewed a resume for a colleague who was trying to define a clearer career strategy. She has terrific experience. And yet, as I looked through it I could see the problem she was concerned about... she had done so many good things in so many different fields it was hard to know what was distinctive about her.

As we talked it became clear the resume was only the symptom of a deeper issue. In an attempt to be useful and adaptable she has said yes to too many good projects and opportunities. She has ended up feeling overworked and underutilized. It is easy to see how people end up in her situation:

Step 1: Capable people are driven to achieve.

Step 2: Other people see they are capable and give them assignments.

Step 3: Capable people gain a reputation as "go to" people. They become "good old [insert name] who is always there when you need him." There is lots right with this, unless or until...

Step 4: Capable people end up doing lots of projects well but are distracted from what would otherwise be their highest point of contribution which I define as the intersection of talent, passion and market (see more on this in the Harvard Business Review article The Disciplined Pursuit of Less). Then, both the company and the employee lose out.


When this happens, some of the responsibility lies with out-of-touch managers who are too busy or distracted to notice the very best use of their people. But some of the responsibility lies with us. Perhaps we need to be more deliberate and discerning in navigating our own careers.

In the conversation above, we spent some time to identify my colleague's Highest Point of Contribution and develop a plan of action for a more focused career strategy.

We followed a simple process similar to one I write about here: If You Don't Design Your Career, Someone Else Will. My friend is not alone. Indeed, in coaching and teaching managers and executives around the world it strikes me that failure to be conscientious about this represents the #1 mistake, in frequency, I see capable people make in their careers.

Using a camping metaphor, capable people often add additional poles of the same height to their career tent. We end up with 10, 20 or 30 poles of the same height, somehow hoping the tent will go higher. I don't just mean higher on the career ladder either. I mean higher in terms of our ability to contribute.

The slightly painful truth is, at any one time there is only one piece of real estate we can "own" in another person's mind. People can't think of us as a project manager, professor, attorney, insurance agent, editor and entrepreneur all at exactly the same time. They may all be true about us but people can only think of us as one thing first. At any one time there is only one phrase that can follow our name. Might we be better served by asking, at least occasionally, whether the various projects we have add up to a longer pole?

I saw this illustrated some time ago in one of the more distinctive resumes I have seen. It belonged to a Stanford Law School Professor [there it is: the single phrase that follows his name, the longest pole in his career tent]. His resume was clean and concise. For each entry there was one impressive title/role/school and a succinct description of what he had achieved. Each sentence seemed to say more than ten typical bullet points in many resumes I have seen. When he was at university he had been the student body president, under "teaching" he was teacher of the year and so on.

Being able to do many things is important in many jobs today. Broad understanding also is a must. But developing greater discernment about what is distinctive about us can be a great advantage. Instead of simply doing more things we need to find, at every phase in our careers, our highest point of contribution.

http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/a...le-people-make

evolved 01-23-2013 11:23 AM

Are you Greg McKeown??

SLVR JDM 01-23-2013 11:49 AM

If you don't take control of your career, no one else will. Once you have that awareness, make intentional steps to make your plans come to fruition.
This isn't news, but there are a lot of people out there waiting for an opportunity to come to them vs. being proactive to make things happen.

rohde88 01-23-2013 04:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SLVR JDM (Post 15088369)
If you don't take control of your career, no one else will. Once you have that awareness, make intentional steps to make your plans come to fruition.
This isn't news, but there are a lot of people out there waiting for an opportunity to come to them vs. being proactive to make things happen.

Similar to that, no one is looking out for you or your interests. You only deserve what you can rip out of someone else's hands.

My boss told me to read Winning Through Intimidation by Robert Ringer. Great book that teaches you how you can fight for yourself.

SLVR JDM 01-23-2013 04:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rohde88 (Post 15089400)
Similar to that, no one is looking out for you or your interests. You only deserve what you can rip out of someone else's hands.

My boss told me to read Winning Through Intimidation by Robert Ringer. Great book that teaches you how you can fight for yourself.

I will check out that book. It never hurts to have a few more tools / ideas when it comes to this topic.

rohde88 01-23-2013 04:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SLVR JDM (Post 15089440)
I will check out that book. It never hurts to have a few more tools / ideas when it comes to this topic.

It basically argues that being prepared for every negotiation and treating every negotiation as a fixed "money" pie will change your perspective.

Certainly true for dealing with third parties, internally it applies to a lesser degree.

Wraisil 01-23-2013 05:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SLVR JDM (Post 15089440)
I will check out that book. It never hurts to have a few more tools / ideas when it comes to this topic.

Read "The Anatomy of Success" by Darvas too. My biggest takeaway from that book was:
"The most common failure in a professional career is failing to recognize and take advantage of opportunities when they present themselves."

mcr_driver 01-25-2013 10:53 AM

I definitely need to check out the anatomy of success I feel very underutilized in my current job and am becoming more and more complacint. I've tried to reach and and just barely am getting additional training towards a higher up position but I feel they aren't pushing the matter enough to get me trained fast enough for me to succeed.

bimmerfan08 03-29-2013 06:55 PM

Been awhile since I checked this thread. My attitude is you only live once...give it all you got, don't take crap within reason, and voice your desires. I know I'm young and just starting out, but I have definitely voiced what I want and where I want to be within my company. I get a lot of respect from management for that. For you guys that posted recommended books, I'll check to see if we have those at work. If not I'll have my manager order them for me to read while traveling.


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