View Single Post
Old 05-29-2009, 01:40 AM   #22
GTUnit
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: SoCal
Posts: 349
My Ride: short bus
Send a message via AIM to GTUnit
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attaus View Post
There are two problems, one of which is that nobody wants to invest into a kit for the 330, and the second is nobody really knows much about the M54 block. "Experts" out there claim that the M54 can't take more than 400hp because of the aluminum block, however this has never been proven to be true.
What kind of proof do you want? Have them build motors and have them blow up? Who is going to foot the bill for that? Experienced builders dont want to spend money on something they see weaknesses in. You also have to allow for a "margin of safety" when building a motor. You cannot run it at its limit. Some dumbass customer will do something stupid and come to complaining your kit blew up and sucks and they want their money back.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Attaus View Post
Let's look at the facts; the M54B30 is composed of an aluminim alloy block, forged steel connecting rods, and a one-piece forged crank. To me, this motor seems overbuilt.
Based on what? No offense but what qualifications/knowledge/experience do you have to make such an assumption?

The materials used dont mean anything if the structure cannot support the forces involved. The body on my car is made of steel. I can punch a large size dent in the side of it. If that body were 1/4 thick of the same material I would break my hand. See the difference? The shape/structure also matters.

There is a lot that goes into motor design to allow it to hold a certain amount of power.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Attaus View Post
The only weak point I can see is the 10.5:1 compression, which can be compensated for in a couple of different ways. Some claim that the aluminum isn't able to hold the heat of more power and will crack, however with today's technology IAT's can be as low as 70 degrees. I've been looking around for the heat capacity of the al-sil block, but I haven't found a definite answer.
Coming out of a turbo the IAT will be closer to 100 degrees.
Aluminum is better for turbocharging because it conducts heat away from the combustion chamber faster. Lower burn temperatures allow you to run more boost or a higher compression ratio.
Once again you are discussing things you seem to have little background on and making generalizations based on opinions and feelings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Attaus View Post
The evidence to prove that 400hp is not the limit can be found in KromeX's car, a 330i with over 430whp, that has been running for a couple of years. He has a well-built, but simple setup, including head studs, new pistons and rods, and a new HG.
How much power a car can handle for how long also depends on how it is used, the tune, the way it is loaded, cooling, propensity to detonate, ect.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Attaus View Post
I understand that there is limited availability for the 330, but turbo manifolds can be found, and that's really the only model-specific turbo part you need. IC pipes, lines, turbos, are all universal. The only hinging point is the tuning, which would need to be sourced.
The tuning, internals, and fuel system are the most important parts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Attaus View Post
I wanted to bring this topic to the table and have a good technical discussion about why or why not the 330 can make more than 400hp because the answer still seems to be up in the air. What do you think?
It is always good to discuss. You need to get a good look at a motor (block) in pieces to see how well it is built. You look at web thickness, types of cylinder liners, upper deck stability and layout, main bearing support, oiling system (critical), ect. Many factors. If people want to put up the cash then we can build a kit.
__________________
GTUnit is offline   Reply With Quote