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Old 09-10-2010, 11:04 AM   #24
naginalf
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 53
My Ride: 325XIT
I really hope that, if they're going to further their hybrid line, they do it right. Having the electric inline with the motor is the half-arsed way of doing hybrid. I was looking into a new hybrid honda CR-Z, and in their history section for the car, the 1985 CR-X was getting 45-50MPG. Then, wait a minute, this half arsed hybrid has a crappy little SOHC 1.5L and only gets 33-38MPG! WTF! Anyway, the best way to go is the way of the Chevy Volt. In fact, this is nowhere near a new idea. We've had passive hybrids in every diesel train engine ever made. The difference there is that the train is using the electrics as a means of power transmission without a clutch (which would burn up instantly trying to move a train). But using a small, cheap battery or even capacitor bank to handle acceleration needs, you can set the ICE to run at a much more consistent RPM to meet charging demands, and suddenly you have a supremely efficient way to power the car with very little cost in batteries (most of the cost of an EV) and no changes need be made to existing fueling systems. But this sort of thing has been stalled at every turn because a sudden decrease in fuel usage would not only mean the decline of oil industries and their associated bit of the economy, but also effect the jobs millions of people all across the country. But with more and more people clamoring for something other than oil, they've given in, but only a bit at a time. Hybrids were their first concession, but that's a joke, as you can see from the CR-Z example, we're not making any progress with hybrid cars, they've actually come down in efficiency from a freakin 1985 carbureted motor! But the really cool thing to come of all this, is that when we finally have our electric motors dolling out the power, we'll have some REALLY fast cars.
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