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Old 09-27-2011, 01:07 PM   #12
brew
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Join Date: May 2003
Location: Central Oregon
Posts: 341
My Ride: Sequoia X5 MR2 G20
Mix a healthy splash of basalmic vinegar into your ground beef if you're making burgers - add some crushed garlic and salt and pepper, too.

Mustard makes an excellent marinade for beef - especially roasts and ribs. Mix up equal parts butter and dijon mustard and slather it on the meat, then let it sit overnight uncovered in the fridge so that it dries out a bit. Will give meat a bit of zing and a lot of flavor, but will NOT taste much like mustard. People won't taste mustard unless you tell them. (I've heard that Brits traditionally use lots of mustard in cooking, so Goughie probably knows that . . but using tons of mustard in cooking is a strange concept in the US)

Buy crushed red chilis in bulk at the asian store and use it with everything.

Cook beef roasts at 250 degrees until you hit an internal temp of 130 degrees, then remove, cover and wait an hour. Perfect medium rare beef throughout without the medium/well edges that you get at higher temps. Same with cooking ribs or other slow cook items - lower temps are better.

In almost any dish that involves chopped meat and/or veggies, if you cut the meat and veggies into extra small pieces, the dish will taste better.

Buying (and using) an instant-read thermometer like this: http://www.thermoworks.com/products/thermapen/ will make you a better cook, guaranteed.

Brining meat will flavor it and keep it from drying out. Wonder how good restaurants are able to perfectly cook pork chops and chicken breasts without them turning into those hard dried out pieces of meat you make at home? They brine their meat. Mix 1/2 cup of kosher salt with 1/2 gallon of water, then add seasoning, like pepper, bay leaves, garlic, chilis, etc. Soak your meat for 2-3 hours for chops to 12-24 hours for tenderloins and whole birds. Osmosis will cause the the salt and spices to be drawn into the meat. The meat will now retain moisture when cooking, so it won't dry out and it will be seasoned throughout.
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