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Old 11-19-2011, 08:02 PM   #34
Reedo302
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Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Minnesota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostie View Post
Isn't the striking distance something like 7ft for someone with a knife? She was well within that, and could still have stabbed him even after he got a shot off.

IMO she didn't need to advance any further in other for me to consider her a threat, the fact that she drew the knife and then refused to back down (at that distance) is enough to set off alarms. He was also backed into a corner in the dark, I personally would have been wondering if she was just a distraction for someone else to sneak up on me.

Her size/gender don't matter to me
Tip-in distance is 5ft. This is the distance that someone can hit you or make contact with you instantaneously.
Reactionary Gap is 21ft (7yds). This is the distance that it takes for someone to close the gap to you before you can react. This is calculated by time. The average reaction time is 1.5 seconds, which allows for that 21ft.
She was well within lethal distance with that knife. There are the key elements that would work to his advantage in using deadly force-
1. She is the aggressor and is within the reactionary gap
2. He is backed into a corner and cannot retreat
3. She did not heed the warning
All that equals a good shoot.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JonJon View Post
I disagree with his volunteering of information to 911. He said way too much. That recording will be played back a hundred times on TV and in court.

There are also situations when even calling 911 at all or reporting the incident is a bad move all together (hell, in the video, the guy was shot by the cops!). If it's a good shoot, there is no "crime" to report. Why place yourself at the scene or report yourself as involved? You have no duty to do so. Personally, I don't want my name and home address published all over the newspapers and TV to the bad guys family and friends on where and when to find me and my family for retaliation. There are situations where I would, and some that I may not.
By you calling and giving info, you are prepping the police to arrive with your side of the events on their minds. This could be considered "spin control". It's best to have people arriving on scene to arrive with the report of a man defended himself from attack, as opposed just "shots fired and one person down". The reason why he got shot in one of the scenarios was for lack of communication and lack of understanding of what the police are going to perceive.

If you don't call, that's on you. It's incredibly ill-advised if you don't, but that's on you.
Let's consider the "what ifs"..
Say you don't call. What happens when police find a dead body on the street? What happens if the weapon is missing because a bum or street thug came by and took it (homeless people love knives for protection) and took all of her belongings? Kinda looks like a murder-robbery now. Then what happens when nearby surveillance cameras capture you leaving the area around the time that someone in the neighborhood reported hearing gunshots, or the time when the coroner determines was time of death? Now you're starting to look like a suspect. Say there's enough corroborating evidence to put you at the scene because a neighbor or business owner saw you leave the area right after the shots. Then the police take all that info, get a search warrant and search your house and car, and they locate a gun in the same caliber used to shoot the woman. Then they test it and ballistics match.
By that time, you're looking very much like a suspect, and saying "it was self defense" becomes much less believable. But by then, you'll likely have lawyered-up and won't talk to police, so they will submit the evidence to the county attorney that puts you at the scene and in possession of the murder weapon. Next thing you know, you're being charged with murder.
Think it can't happen? Watch the First 48 on A&E.

Instead, give them the info they need to respond, tell them whatever you need to in order to make them think you're the victim and you were acting within all of the elements of state statute (fear for life, no way to retreat, etc.), and then contact your attorney as soon as you safely can.
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Last edited by Reedo302; 11-19-2011 at 08:04 PM.
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