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Suspension & Braking
Have some questions about suspension or brake setups for your E46 BMW? Get all your answers here!

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Old 09-06-2012, 04:56 PM   #61
Mango
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Good tool but looks a little wide. might be awkward trying to work with. Also are you sure that will catch the trailing arm just perfectly? Looks a little narrow. The MIS tool is as minimal as it gets... its actually a little short for the E36 M3 for some reason.. just slightly but i got it to work
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Old 09-06-2012, 05:07 PM   #62
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Thanks. I had the 2"x3/4" stock handy so I used that. I've got 64mm inside the tool with a 2 1/2" depth. If I need to I will cut down the contact points on the U but I think it will seat well. I mainly want it to draw the bushing in and even it up. The old one came out quite easily for me.

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Old 09-06-2012, 06:58 PM   #63
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Great success. 15 minutes. Just like everybody say. You just need the right tool for the job. Click image for larger version

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sent from my ATARI sc1224
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Old 09-07-2012, 07:54 AM   #64
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Originally Posted by E46Mango View Post
remove the lower 18mm shock bolt as well. torque shock bolt to 78 ft lbs and carrier to body @ 47 ft lbs each.
why do we need to remove lower shock bolt? don't think I've seem that in any
of the DIY
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Old 09-07-2012, 10:16 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by fanatic128 View Post
why do we need to remove lower shock bolt? don't think I've seem that in any
of the DIY
It allows the RTA the ability to swing down further and freely to make room working on the bushing. Otherwise it would stay closer up to the underside of the car.

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Old 09-07-2012, 10:22 AM   #66
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nice tool, hi ho. do you work in fabrication or something? i'd like to be able to make my own tools. jealous!
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Old 09-07-2012, 01:55 PM   #67
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nice tool, hi ho. do you work in fabrication or something? i'd like to be able to make my own tools. jealous!
Actually I do. I specialize in Overhead Cranes,but our buisness is a full industrial fab shop with every type of tooling or welding there is. Just no CNC equipment. Brakes,shears,punch presses,mig,tig,ark,all of that stuff. Been doing this since high school.

Anyone want the tool? I'm all set with it. Pick it up free or pay shipping from CT. Use it and pass it on again. See how far it can make it!

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Old 09-07-2012, 02:22 PM   #68
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Actually I do. I specialize in Overhead Cranes,but our buisness is a full industrial fab shop with every type of tooling or welding there is. Just no CNC equipment. Brakes,shears,punch presses,mig,tig,ark,all of that stuff. Been doing this since high school.

Anyone want the tool? I'm all set with it. Pick it up free or pay shipping from CT. Use it and pass it on again. See how far it can make it!

sent from my ATARI sc1224
that's actually very generous of you and a great idea. someone better snag that quick. how resistant are the threads of the blocks and rod to stripping? my MIS tool stripped its rod (and yes i covered it in oil) due to a rusted on RTAB (original presumbaly) and MIS had to ship me out a new rod (for $7) but the blocks remained true and didnt strip. Any insight as to how the rod stripped but not the block? Does yours require oil?

maybe i can buy some rod from you if i ever strip it again.
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Old 09-07-2012, 04:17 PM   #69
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I need to do my RTABs. Let me know how much the shipping is to 93012.

Mango can have visitation since he's just up the grade from me

Thanks!
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Old 09-07-2012, 04:50 PM   #70
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If the rod was worn from previous use,it can only get worse. I ended up using a piece of grade 5 3/8-16 rod. The nut size is 9/16. It took a decent amount of torque but I braced the tool in one hand and used a regular box wrench in the other. I oiled it and the washers just to help. With the block being so thick,there is a lot of thread there to hold strong and your rod is the weak link. I actually heat treated and quenched my block as well to keep the threads strong in there.
To be fair,my old bushings were so shot so the center pushed right out by hand. Then I scored the bushing race from the inside out with a sawzall. It came out no problem that way.

Schlag,I wrote your zip down and will get you a price. I'm going to guess it will be less than 20 or so. Putyoursoxon is coming down tommorow so we can install some headers on his M and we may do his bushes very soon after. Then you have dibs.

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Old 09-10-2012, 11:46 PM   #71
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Guys

Thanks for the tips and advice for the DIY RTABs replacement. I tackled this job this past weekend and I am absolutely glad that it is a once in a car's lifetime type thing.

Here's my notes and feedback about the whole process...

I managed to complete the RTAB refresh this weekend and even with the troubles I had, I am now enjoying a more planted rear end. I don't have to counter steer the effect of worn rear bushings anymore! If you have an afternoon available, this is definitely worthwhile on higher mileage cars.

I did use the MIS tool (lifesaver!) and I would recommend lots and lots of patience. Also, using 2 breaker bars or 1 breaker and the additional size (length) of the torque wrench will save some hassle and provide leverage in tightening everything down again. If you can, find some shallow sockets (18mm) to use for this DIY as the spaces are very tight. A coloured crayon or grease pencil is highly recommended to mark out the RTAB carrier position on the underbody and the angle of the carrier on the RTA itself.

From my own experience and time spent under the car I would recommend doing some sort of a pressure wash under the car in advance of the DIY. Give it time to dry up so that you're not dealing with the residual water as well as the DIY. Reason being is simple - there is so much crud under there from years of driving and road grime collecting that it goes everywhere (hair, face, mouth, EYES #@!$@#$) even though I was wearing protective glasses. Also makes it easier to deal with parts that are clean.

I was going to change my rear LCAs whilst in there for no other reason than I had replacements available but by the time I got through one side I was not prepared to deal with a second DIY concurrently.

I decided not to use limiters at all as I expected the bushing material in the Meyle HD bushings to be of a more solid construction to standard OE RTABs and I believe this to be correct.

Whilst I am not a mechanic by any stretch, I am reasonably competent at following instructions and I would rate the difficulty on this DIY in the range of a 5/10. I have previously R&R my FCAs, FCABs, tie rods, sway bushings and front sway links myself (with a little additional muscle from my brother) all in my garage using jack stands and basic tools. What will get you is the patience and sometimes sheer muscle effort required for some steps, of course depending on your specific scenario. For a first timer, I would allow 2 hours per side and you may also need an extra hand to assist with some unbolting / re-torquing steps.

Last point to note is that you should press in the bushings with the 'gap' in the rubber aligned vertically just to make placing the carrier back on a little easier.
From memory, all the nuts and bolts are 18mm (wheel lug nuts are 17mm).

Use Mango's pointers above for torque specs and how to mark out carrier positions.

Cheers and good luck!
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Old 09-21-2012, 03:40 PM   #72
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Good job. And Schlag, just come pick it up from me one day in Agoura Hills. make sure you bring it back and don't go stripping my rod. last guy that stripped my rod got decked in the eye. (haha nah you'd just have to pay me $10 for a new rod) best $10 you ever spent on a rod though... trust me!
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