E46 BMW Social Directory E46 FAQ 3-Series Discussion Forums BMW Photo Gallery BMW 3-Series Technical Information E46 Fanatics - The Ultimate BMW Resource BMW Vendors General E46 Forum The Tire Rack's Tire Wheel Forum Forced Induction Forum The Off-Topic The E46 BMW Showroom For Sale, For Trade or Wanting to Buy

Welcome to the E46Fanatics forums. E46Fanatics is the premiere website for BMW 3 series owners around the world with interactive forums, a geographical enthusiast directory, photo galleries, and technical information for BMW enthusiasts.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

Go Back   E46Fanatics > Everything Else > The Off-Topic > General Off-Topic

General Off-Topic
Everything not about BMWs. Posts must be "primetime" safe and in good taste. You must be logged in to see sub-forums.
Click here to browse all new posts.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rating: Thread Rating: 13 votes, 5.00 average.
Old 10-19-2012, 06:01 PM   #1461
andrewrossnagel
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: nyc
Posts: 245
My Ride: .
andrewrossnagel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2012, 03:29 AM   #1462
Raymond42262
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: The South
Posts: 453
My Ride: Is German
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowmoo32 View Post
3D printing is about to blow wide open in the consumer market and I'd be willing to bet it revolutionizes the way we buy a lot of things in the next 20 years. Need a replacement part for something you bought? Pay a nominal fee to the manufacturer and they'll send you the design to print at home, or just design and print it yourself. And once we hit atomic resolution (we're already at the nano scale) with 3D printing, we'll be able to print literally anything, atom by atom.

edit: Case and point
http://boingboing.net/2012/10/01/pop...anufactur.html
This is not the first idea that comes to everyone's mind, but I spent some time in the Army. Whenever you go out on a mission, you do a map of the terrain features. You might scratch out a map in the dirt and try to highlight the main features to familiarize everyone with what you will be doing.

It would be great if you could input some grid coordinates and 5 minutes later the printer would create a 3D map of the area you input, complete with geographical features, different color representations, different elevations represented etc........

There would be a great use for it there.

It would also be useful on the space station printing out parts and supplies they need. This way they would not have to inventory 1000 spare parts they may never need.
__________________
"The grand essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, someone to love, and something to hope for."....Joseph Addison
--------------------

Last edited by Raymond42262; 10-20-2012 at 03:34 AM.
Raymond42262 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2012, 09:36 AM   #1463
cowmoo32
drunken science
 
cowmoo32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 5,532
My Ride: Trek 1.5
Printing a 3D map would be pretty badass, and totally feasible too. I would imagine the military has access to topo maps for just about anywhere in the world. Those elevations could easily be fed in and printed out.
__________________

flickher

What's this about a brownie in motion?
cowmoo32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2012, 10:37 AM   #1464
k2pilot
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Sonoma County, CA
Posts: 340
My Ride: Z4MC & B8 S4
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowmoo32 View Post
3D printing is about to blow wide open in the consumer market and I'd be willing to bet it revolutionizes the way we buy a lot of things in the next 20 years. Need a replacement part for something you bought? Pay a nominal fee to the manufacturer and they'll send you the design to print at home, or just design and print it yourself. And once we hit atomic resolution (we're already at the nano scale) with 3D printing, we'll be able to print literally anything, atom by atom.

edit: Case and point
http://boingboing.net/2012/10/01/pop...anufactur.html
Between powdered metal technologies and integrating CNT's or other composites in to the resin mix, there's major potential for the rapid construction of structural 3D parts. This could also be where nano cellulose fibers come in to play. However for those same reasons I know too many people wanting to give up on traditional manufacturering methods, thinking 3D printin will make them obsolete; while speaking more realistically there's still very much a place for large scale production of parts with low cycle times.
__________________
Quote:
"I love deadlines. I love the whooshing noise they make as they go past." Douglas Adams
k2pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2012, 10:51 AM   #1465
cowmoo32
drunken science
 
cowmoo32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 5,532
My Ride: Trek 1.5
Quote:
Originally Posted by k2pilot View Post
Between powdered metal technologies and integrating CNT's or other composites in to the resin mix, there's major potential for the rapid construction of structural 3D parts. This could also be where nano cellulose fibers come in to play. However for those same reasons I know too many people wanting to give up on traditional manufacturering methods, thinking 3D printin will make them obsolete; while speaking more realistically there's still very much a place for large scale production of parts with low cycle times.
I wonder if CNTs could be thrown into the mix somehow for integrated electronics
__________________

flickher

What's this about a brownie in motion?
cowmoo32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2012, 11:11 AM   #1466
triniboy18
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 88
My Ride: 2000 323 Ci
Orionid meteor showers are said to peak tonight and tomorrow night around 1:00am. Anyone else going to be watching?


clear skies,
triniboy18 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2012, 11:41 AM   #1467
cowmoo32
drunken science
 
cowmoo32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 5,532
My Ride: Trek 1.5
Fvck living in a city. I'd kill to be down at the beach tonight.
__________________

flickher

What's this about a brownie in motion?
cowmoo32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2012, 01:52 AM   #1468
triniboy18
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 88
My Ride: 2000 323 Ci
Just got back, saw a couple of meteors but only two that had really long runs across the sky. hahah yup it does kinda suck having through sit through the cold in order to stargaze but its definitely worth it especially when you see the planets through a telescope.
triniboy18 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2012, 10:23 AM   #1469
Rubenk
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: KCMO
Posts: 1,696
My Ride: M35A2
Princeton researchers claim quantum computing breakthrough.

Quote:
Dylan McGrath
10/19/2012 3:50 PM EDT
SAN FRANCISCO-Researchers from Princeton University have developed a technique to read spintronic information off electrons, a potential step on the road to quantum computing.

Spintronics-a concept in which information is passed by the spin on electronics rather than their charge- promises to revolutionize the computing industry with smaller, faster and more energy efficient data storage and processing.

The Princeton team, headed by physicist Jason Petta, used a stream of microwave photons to analyze a pair of electrons trapped in a tiny cage called a quantum dot. The microwave stream allowed the scientists to read the spin state of the electrons.

"We create a cavity with mirrors on both ends-but they don't reflect visible light, they reflect microwave radiation," Petta said. "Then we send microwaves in one end, and we look at the microwaves as they come out the other end. The microwaves are affected by the spin states of the electrons in the cavity, and we can read that change."



A circuit uses microwaves to read the quantum state of an electron, a potentially scalable route to developing a quantum computer.

The apparatus created by Petta's team operates over a little more than one centimeter. But, on a subatomic scale, this distance is vast-the team likened the project to coordinating the motion of a top spinning on the moon with another on the surface of the earth.

"It's the most amazing thing," said Jake Taylor, a physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the Joint Quantum Institute at the University of Maryland, who worked on the project with the Princeton team. "You have a single electron almost completely changing the properties of an inch-long electrical system."
Page 2
Quote:
Building a larger system
Petta said his team's finding could eventually allow engineers to build quantum computers consisting of millions of quantum bits, or qubits. So far, quantum researchers have only been able to manipulate small numbers of qubits, not enough for a practical machine.

"The whole game at this point in quantum computing is trying to build a larger system," said Andrew Houck, an assistant professor of electrical engineering who is part of the research team.

For years, teams of scientists have pursued the idea of using quantum mechanics to build a new machine that would revolutionize computing. The goal is not build a faster or more powerful computer, but to build one that approaches problems in a completely different fashion.

"The point of a quantum computer is not that they can do what a normal computer can do but faster; that's not what they are," said Houck. "The quantum computer would allow us to approach problems differently. It would allow us to solve problems that cannot be solved with a normal computer."

One challenge facing scientists is that the spins of electrons, or any other quantum particles, are incredibly delicate. Any outside influences, whether a wisp of magnetism or glimpse of light, destabilizes the electrons' spins and introduces errors.

Over the years, scientists have developed techniques to observe spin states without disturbing them. But analyzing small numbers of spins is not enough; millions will be required to make a real quantum processor.

To approach the problem, Petta's team combined techniques from two branches of science. From materials science, they used a structure called a quantum dot to hold and analyze electrons' spins. From optics, they adopted a microwave channel to transfer the spin information from the dot.

"The methods we are using here are scalable, and we would like to use them in a larger system," Petta said. "But to make use of the scaling, it needs to work a little better. The first step is to make better mirrors for the microwave cavity."
Source: http://www.eetimes.com/electronics-n...ntum-computing

Last edited by Rubenk; 10-22-2012 at 10:24 AM.
Rubenk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2012, 11:37 AM   #1470
cowmoo32
drunken science
 
cowmoo32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 5,532
My Ride: Trek 1.5
__________________

flickher

What's this about a brownie in motion?
cowmoo32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2012, 11:40 AM   #1471
GRIFFIN
NWS
 
GRIFFIN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: California
Posts: 1,700
My Ride: 04 330i zsp,zpp,zcw
__________________

** Removed - Please stop - Tim330i **
*NWS GIF REMOVED*
*GIF REMOVED*
* Continuing to put animated images in your sig will get you banned - Tim330i *
**You make me so horny.- Tim330i **
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedges View Post
I can honestly say that because of Griffin, i am desensitized to alot of wierd stuff!
GRIFFIN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2012, 04:53 PM   #1472
jeffro3000
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Huntsville, AL
Posts: 2,812
My Ride: 2000 328i
Navy's Laser Weapons Just 2 Years Away, Admiral Says

I <3 lasers
jeffro3000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2012, 04:57 PM   #1473
cowmoo32
drunken science
 
cowmoo32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 5,532
My Ride: Trek 1.5
2 years? C-130s have been equipped with solid state lasers for a long time now. I wonder if they've just been working on reducing the space required for all the equipment.
__________________

flickher

What's this about a brownie in motion?
cowmoo32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2012, 05:11 PM   #1474
jeffro3000
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Huntsville, AL
Posts: 2,812
My Ride: 2000 328i
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowmoo32 View Post
2 years? C-130s have been equipped with solid state lasers for a long time now. I wonder if they've just been working on reducing the space required for all the equipment.
As far as i know the air force has always used COIL lasers (starting with the Airborne Laser in the 90s), which are humongous, expensive, and high maintenance, although very powerful. The Advanced Tactical Laser you're referring to is a COIL.

The navy has been pioneering the use of much more simple solid state lasers, which can be implemented more broadly, hopefully leading to more widespread use. I think the army has been working on up-scaling SS lasers as well, but it sounds like the Navy is farther along.

From wikipedia:

Quote:
There is some discussion of converting to solid state lasers from the existing chemical lasers. Being much smaller and lighter, solid state lasers might be deployable on smaller platforms. The existing chemical laser platform is being used to develop more advanced control software and hardware and to reduce problems such as "jitter".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Tactical_Laser

Last edited by jeffro3000; 10-23-2012 at 05:13 PM.
jeffro3000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2012, 10:53 AM   #1475
cowmoo32
drunken science
 
cowmoo32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 5,532
My Ride: Trek 1.5
The sea floor has an untold amount of biological wiring pulsing with electricity.

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/20...1&viewall=true
Quote:
The new Desulfobulbaceae, seen in cross-section above, has a shape seemingly adapted to conducting electricity. Down each bacterium run deep channels, which are aligned continuously as the bacteria join into one long filament. It's through these channels that electrons likely course. (This is still speculation, albeit informed -- the bacteria clearly transfer electrons, but the exact route hasn't been mapped.) The walls of the channels and a surrounding membrane may have insulating properties, like sheathing around a wire.

In just one teaspoon of mud, the researchers found a full half-mile of Desulfobulbaceae cable, and it's not just a Danish phenomenon. Nielsen said other researchers have sent him samples from seafloors around the world, including Tokyo Bay. It's possible that, at the microbial level, the deep seafloor is humming with current.
__________________

flickher

What's this about a brownie in motion?
cowmoo32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2012, 10:59 PM   #1476
iwannagofast
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: 858/305
Posts: 315
My Ride: 01 330ci
Send a message via AIM to iwannagofast
^
__________________

xbox live: stopthisfall
iwannagofast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2012, 01:48 PM   #1477
Xcelratr
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: So Cal - 310
Posts: 958
My Ride: 04 330Ci ZHP
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl...s-in-jail.html

Obviously the article is short on details. It may be that the scientists involved in this were corrupt, or grossly incompetent, or derelict.

But if it's true that their only crime was not predicting an earthquake, their conviction is truly disheartening.

__________________
----------------------------------------------
Quote:
As a juror, do you think the trial was a publicity stunt?

Yes
----------------------------------------------
Xcelratr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2012, 05:00 PM   #1478
Raymond42262
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: The South
Posts: 453
My Ride: Is German
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xcelratr View Post
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl...s-in-jail.html

Obviously the article is short on details. It may be that the scientists involved in this were corrupt, or grossly incompetent, or derelict.

But if it's true that their only crime was not predicting an earthquake, their conviction is truly disheartening.

It's funny, Italy prosecutes seismologists for failing to predict earthquakes and the U.S . says we are not at the level that we can predict them. The guy that predicted the North Ridge earthquake in California in 1991 was fired.

I feel sorry for those Italians. They were looking for someone to blame and they were easy targets.
__________________
"The grand essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, someone to love, and something to hope for."....Joseph Addison
--------------------
Raymond42262 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2012, 05:02 PM   #1479
Raymond42262
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: The South
Posts: 453
My Ride: Is German
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowmoo32 View Post
The sea floor has an untold amount of biological wiring pulsing with electricity.

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/20...1&viewall=true
electricity through ground seawater ?

I wonder if this is the basis that our Navy has been using for decades to transmit communication signals through the Earth.
__________________
"The grand essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, someone to love, and something to hope for."....Joseph Addison
--------------------
Raymond42262 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2012, 05:07 PM   #1480
Raymond42262
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: The South
Posts: 453
My Ride: Is German
It won't be too long before every trick and every gizmo they used in Star Trek will become reality.
--------------------------


NYU Scientists Are Seriously Working On A Tractor Beam

A couple New York University researchers just published a paper about the possibility of building a real-life, no joke tractor beam.
Yes, like in Star Wars, but no, not like in Star Wars.
Not so because they can only get it to work on particles and molecules so far.
From the abstract submitted by Doctors David B. Ruffner and David G. Grier, of the Department of Physics and Center for Soft Matter Research, NYU:
We experimentally demonstrate a class of tractor beams created by coherently superposing coaxial Bessel beams. These optical conveyors have periodic intensity variations along their axes that act as highly effective optical traps for micrometer-scale objects. Trapped objects can be moved selectively upstream or downstream along the conveyor by appropriately changing the Bessel beams' relative phase. The same methods used to project a single optical conveyor can project arrays of independent optical conveyors, allowing bidirectional transport in three dimensions.

To save you the trouble of reading through the paper, basically this is a huge development because previously, "tractor" beams, or optical conveyors, needed two points of origin, which would oscillate particle output to push the principal to the left or right of the beam.
This new research needs only one point of origin.

From their paper:
Here, we describe another category of tractor beams derived from the optical conveyor belts introduced in Refs. [2, 3, 4] that can be projected from a single source and can transport material bidirectionally without the aid of outside forces. A one-sided optical conveyor is formed by projecting two or more coherent Bessel beams along the same axis and systematically varying their relative phase.
Now this from the synopsis written on Physics Applications:
Now in Physical Review Letters, David Ruffner and David Grier of New York University describe pushing and pulling particles over relatively long distances-tens of microns and, in principle, much longer-using a "tractor beam" that could prove more versatile.
Although the technique won't be snagging enemy spacecraft anytime soon, it could be a powerful way to manipulate objects under a microscope.
There are military applications for sure, nonetheless it's still a long way from snatching galactic princesses out of space, but, hey, it's a start.



http://www.businessinsider.com/nyu-s...r-beam-2012-10
__________________
"The grand essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, someone to love, and something to hope for."....Joseph Addison
--------------------
Raymond42262 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Censor is ON





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
(c) 1999 - 2011 performanceIX Inc - privacy policy - terms of use