E46 BMW Social Directory E46 FAQ 3-Series Discussion Forums BMW Photo Gallery BMW 3-Series Technical Information E46 Fanatics - The Ultimate BMW Resource BMW Vendors General E46 Forum The Tire Rack's Tire Wheel Forum Forced Induction Forum The Off-Topic The E46 BMW Showroom For Sale, For Trade or Wanting to Buy

Welcome to the E46Fanatics forums. E46Fanatics is the premiere website for BMW 3 series owners around the world with interactive forums, a geographical enthusiast directory, photo galleries, and technical information for BMW enthusiasts.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

Go Back   E46Fanatics > E46 BMW > General E46 Forum

General E46 Forum
This is the place to get answers, opinions and everything you need related to your E46 (sedan, coupe, convertible and wagon) BMW!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 12-07-2012, 12:17 PM   #21
gselsidi
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: fort lee
Posts: 517
My Ride: 2005 325i M56
I mean they are printing drones and airplane parts I'm sure it can print some mechanical parts.
gselsidi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 12:20 PM   #22
WDE46
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Old Greg's Cavern
Posts: 9,464
My Ride: 2004 330Ci OBM
I have been following this tech on and off for a while. It is quite exciting, but it is to be used only for prototyping, especially at this stage. The materials available are not stronger than what BMW molds its part out of. If you made an expansion tank from a 3D printer right now, it would blow up. If they ever figure out how to print composite materials, then we may be on to something. Right now, as I said before, this is only useful for engineering prototyping. It is incredibly usful for that. You can print a part design and test fit it, then have the real part machined. It eliminates that intermediate money waste of machining a part or making a mold for a single part and having it fail to work. The accuracy is also of concern. Due to the nature of plastics, tolerances are at minimum several thousandths. This is absolutely fine for some parts (most plastic parts have quite loose tolerances), but for precision work, only metal machining or molding can acheive the proper results.

Last edited by WDE46; 12-07-2012 at 12:22 PM.
WDE46 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 12:26 PM   #23
gselsidi
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: fort lee
Posts: 517
My Ride: 2005 325i M56
The new printers can use metals. Boeing is printing engine turbine parts, military drones are being printed. GE is printing airplane engine blades.

Last edited by gselsidi; 12-07-2012 at 12:27 PM.
gselsidi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 12:31 PM   #24
choxor
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 4,559
My Ride: JDM
Quote:
Originally Posted by gselsidi View Post
The new printers can use metals. Boeing is printing engine turbine parts, military drones are being printed. GE is printing airplane engine blades.
And cost more than you will ever see in your lifetime.
__________________
choxor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 12:36 PM   #25
tock172
Beachtown Bill Collector
 
tock172's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 2,921
My Ride: '99 Techno Violet M3
Quote:
Originally Posted by choxor View Post
And cost more than you will ever see in your lifetime.
I wouldn't go that far. As I previously stated within this thread, there are numerous companies working to bring this technology into every American home for the price point of around $800.
__________________


1999 Techno Violet Metallic M3
Bilstein | Kosei K1 Racing | Toyo Proxes R888 | BMW CCA #430881

tock172 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 12:40 PM   #26
NOVAbimmer
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: VA
Posts: 12,629
My Ride: 14 Impala FXST M796
Quote:
Originally Posted by tock172 View Post
I wouldn't go that far. As I previously stated within this thread, there are numerous companies working to bring this technology into every American home for the price point of around $800.
you think an inkjet cartridge is expensive? Just wait until you have to buy aluminum and steel cartridges.

It'll be the Gillette model. We'll sell you the printer for $100. Your proprietary cartridges are going to cost you through the roof.
__________________
NOVAbimmer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 12:47 PM   #27
choxor
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 4,559
My Ride: JDM
Quote:
Originally Posted by tock172 View Post
I wouldn't go that far. As I previously stated within this thread, there are numerous companies working to bring this technology into every American home for the price point of around $800.

That can do production level parts. K. Link it.
__________________
choxor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 12:48 PM   #28
gselsidi
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: fort lee
Posts: 517
My Ride: 2005 325i M56
First you don't need a 3d printer the size Boeing is using. You can do it for under 10k for smaller parts. Yes it is going to be a gillet business, but the costs will be relative to today's printer and cartridges once the technology becomes main stream.
gselsidi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 12:50 PM   #29
Grande D
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Dirty South
Posts: 3,391
My Ride: E90 M-Sport
Quote:
Originally Posted by scarede46er View Post
God bless capitalism and the power of the rational man.
__________________


"All lies and jest, still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest."
Grande D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 01:02 PM   #30
gselsidi
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: fort lee
Posts: 517
My Ride: 2005 325i M56
http://production3dprinters.com/slm/direct-metal-slm
can print full metal parts, is it going to be 100% factory quality? Who knows from the looks of it it seems like it is. 5-10 years from now this technology will have advanced even farther.

Were not talkin about printing engine eternal parts, but you can print out a disa metal valve, turn your plastic hoses into stainless metal ones, with enough money though you can print high quality oem products, it will just take some time to get costs down to where people can afford it.
gselsidi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 01:08 PM   #31
NOVAbimmer
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: VA
Posts: 12,629
My Ride: 14 Impala FXST M796
Quote:
Originally Posted by gselsidi View Post
First you don't need a 3d printer the size Boeing is using. You can do it for under 10k for smaller parts. Yes it is going to be a gillet business, but the costs will be relative to today's printer and cartridges once the technology becomes main stream.
I'm not sure what the current spot price on black ink is, but I'm fairly sure it's well under the prices for most metals.

Look at the ideal of being able to print off anything you want (a phone, a computer, complex car parts, robotic automatic intelligent masturbatory aids) and you're really going to up the cost factoring in cost of exotic material. Then having to keep those materials on hand?

It's going to turn into RPG low-level questing combined with alchemy and metallurgy. "Bring the following ingredients: 2 ounces of shinseki steel, 1 pound of pure titanium, three pelts of a wild boar, 7.5 ounces of plastic with the following qualities..."
__________________
NOVAbimmer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 01:17 PM   #32
gselsidi
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: fort lee
Posts: 517
My Ride: 2005 325i M56
Yeah pretty much, but the market will figure costs out eventually. The biggest impact this will have is on manufacturers GE is already saving 50-100M in costs, but I can see companies sending you a kit with the materials and design and you just print it out. Or go the rpg route and have your inventory with toad balls
gselsidi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 01:49 PM   #33
NOVAbimmer
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: VA
Posts: 12,629
My Ride: 14 Impala FXST M796
Quote:
Originally Posted by gselsidi View Post
Yeah pretty much, but the market will figure costs out eventually. The biggest impact this will have is on manufacturers GE is already saving 50-100M in costs, but I can see companies sending you a kit with the materials and design and you just print it out. Or go the rpg route and have your inventory with toad balls
It also pretty much removes any burden of a warranty from those companies who were manufacturers. "Hey, we didn't make it. Any manufacturing defects are on the shoulders of the manufacturer."
__________________
NOVAbimmer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 01:49 PM   #34
WDE46
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Old Greg's Cavern
Posts: 9,464
My Ride: 2004 330Ci OBM
It's pretty clear most people here don't really get how a lot of these 3D printing systems work. A lot of them don't use any sort of catridges. They use a plastic (or metal on the newest ones) powder. The machine deposites a very thin layer of powder and then that layer is either melted with a laser (as in the metal parts one) or it is "glued" together with a binder in the shape of that particular cross section of the part. Then another layer is spread over the first, and the next cross section is binded together. It does this until the part is completly built up. At the end you have to unbury the part and chip off any extra powder that remains. So you would have an adhesive cartridge and bags of powder to put in the machine, or just powder and electricty for lasers.

I can see this technology not quite making it into the home. I don't think there would be that big of a market. I mean how many times have you actually needed to print something? I think it would be used in a manner where you could easily have a company print something for you. Today, if I want a metal part machined, I have to pay a machine shop a **** load of money to have someone either hand make the part, or they have to someone program a $250,000 CNC machine to do the job. With this technology, it would almost be completely unsupervised. No labor needed. Simply pick the correct orientation to print the part in, and let the machine do it. I bet you could order custom parts and have them in your hand in 2 days depending on complexity. No labor would cut out almost all of the cost of machining. You would be surprised at how hard it is to properly machine something even using a CNC machine. By hand is mind blowingly difficult. Well, not difficult, but you have to be perfect, no mistakes.

Last edited by WDE46; 12-07-2012 at 01:50 PM.
WDE46 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 02:01 PM   #35
LeMansteve
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: USA - GA
Posts: 1,825
My Ride: '04 330i 6mt ZSP ZPP
Just because you can print something that looks like a replacement part, doesn't mean it's an acceptable replacement part.
__________________
BMW CCA member - Peachtree Chapter
LeMansteve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 02:17 PM   #36
NOVAbimmer
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: VA
Posts: 12,629
My Ride: 14 Impala FXST M796
Quote:
Originally Posted by gselsidi View Post
Yeah pretty much, but the market will figure costs out eventually. The biggest impact this will have is on manufacturers GE is already saving 50-100M in costs, but I can see companies sending you a kit with the materials and design and you just print it out. Or go the rpg route and have your inventory with toad balls
It also pretty much removes any burden of a warranty from those companies who were manufacturers. "Hey, we didn't make it. Any manufacturing defects are on the shoulders of the manufacturer."
__________________
NOVAbimmer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 02:19 PM   #37
Brevik
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 811
My Ride: Tiag M3
We have several of these at work and they are really cool. The units we have use a very light weight cream colored plastic to build up a part, the metal units must be totally different.
Brevik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 02:21 PM   #38
tock172
Beachtown Bill Collector
 
tock172's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 2,921
My Ride: '99 Techno Violet M3
Quote:
Originally Posted by choxor View Post
That can do production level parts. K. Link it.
Chill, it's probably not even a prototype yet, but I think someday there will be one in every home.

http://www.fool.com/fool/free-report...io-181284.aspx
__________________


1999 Techno Violet Metallic M3
Bilstein | Kosei K1 Racing | Toyo Proxes R888 | BMW CCA #430881


Last edited by tock172; 12-07-2012 at 02:26 PM.
tock172 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 02:22 PM   #39
tock172
Beachtown Bill Collector
 
tock172's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 2,921
My Ride: '99 Techno Violet M3
Quote:
Originally Posted by zhp43867 View Post
I know
__________________


1999 Techno Violet Metallic M3
Bilstein | Kosei K1 Racing | Toyo Proxes R888 | BMW CCA #430881

tock172 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Censor is ON





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
(c) 1999 - 2011 performanceIX Inc - privacy policy - terms of use