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Suspension & Braking
Have some questions about suspension or brake setups for your E46 BMW? Get all your answers here!

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Old 02-07-2013, 09:16 PM   #21
wildirish317
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Originally Posted by college46 View Post
If you read the DIY's on here they have a great video its super easy if you don't have jack stands, you could even do it with the jack in the trunk.
Doing brakes with the car supported by a jack is not as dangerous as crawling under the car to change the oil with the car supported by a jack. After all, you are not actually under the car.

However, when you stick your head in the wheel well to see what you are doing, think about what will happen if the jack slips. The car will fall off the jack, and the rotor will hit the ground, followed by the car body compressing the suspension to absorb the shock. How much clearance is there at the bottom of compression between the rotor, your head, and the car body? It may be enough to avoid squeezing your head, it may not.

Putting the wheel under the car limits the amount of downward travel of the car body, and adds a level of safety.

The important thing is to think about these things. Be aware of the potential dangers of every task, whether it's working on your Bimmer or driving it to work.
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Old 02-08-2013, 02:52 AM   #22
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That's a good idea. I think the squealing is just the pads but can't see myself spending another $300+ in the future to go back and change the rotors. It makes sense to do it all at the same time.
If you spent $100 on tools, you could do this work for free as many times as you want.

Don't use the emergency jack unless you need to, and as just mentioned, use your spare tire under the car just in case...just in case you use that jack. Also, it needs to be while the car is level and the jack is on a hard level surface too.

You should watch brake diys. I understand your concern not having done the pads yet, but it's really pretty simple...as it should be. Brakes are so important, I think that's why they're pretty simple and difficult to mess up.
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Old 02-08-2013, 10:21 AM   #23
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I'm sad to see such a great shop deteriorating so quickly. I'm also going to look for the invoice from the last time we had the brakes changed up front and possibly see if he'd match the previous price.
Yes, my indie was bought out by his competition and the place hasn't been the same. And my dentist sold his practice. Can't stand the new dentist, but feel sorry for his staff.

DIY brakes is not complicated, but it is more difficult than changing oil. And you could end up with brakes that squeal more than they do now. (Still perfectly safe, though.)

Front brakes get more of a workout than the rears. If the pad material is thin, yes, do replace and you won't have to worry about it for years. As for rotors, here's the rub. Whle they cost more than pads, rotors are still pretty inexpensive. A decent rotor can be had for under $50. In my town, it costs $12/rotor to have them resurfaced. And this means carrying them in to the shop. So the best case scenario is that you have to remove them, traipse over to the ship, wait at least an hour for them to to be cut down, then traipse back to your car and reinstall. And the result is rotors that will probably be well under thickness in a couple of years. If you are a "set it and forget it" kind of person, then get new rotors. If you are paying for the work, you shouldn't be charged to install new rotors.

Just make sure that the fluid is changed, too, every 2 years or you will have to replace a caliper, too. Probably the rear. And that will probably mean new pads and rotors.
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Old 02-08-2013, 02:04 PM   #24
wildirish317
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Just make sure that the fluid is changed, too, every 2 years or you will have to replace a caliper, too. Probably the rear. And that will probably mean new pads and rotors.
Very good point!
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Old 02-08-2013, 02:27 PM   #25
2000beamer
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Originally Posted by dmax View Post
If you spent $100 on tools, you could do this work for free as many times as you want.

Don't use the emergency jack unless you need to, and as just mentioned, use your spare tire under the car just in case...just in case you use that jack. Also, it needs to be while the car is level and the jack is on a hard level surface too.

You should watch brake diys. I understand your concern not having done the pads yet, but it's really pretty simple...as it should be. Brakes are so important, I think that's why they're pretty simple and difficult to mess up.
Thanks for your help, Dmax!
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Old 02-08-2013, 02:28 PM   #26
2000beamer
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Originally Posted by sunsetcoast View Post
Yes, my indie was bought out by his competition and the place hasn't been the same. And my dentist sold his practice. Can't stand the new dentist, but feel sorry for his staff.

DIY brakes is not complicated, but it is more difficult than changing oil. And you could end up with brakes that squeal more than they do now. (Still perfectly safe, though.)

Front brakes get more of a workout than the rears. If the pad material is thin, yes, do replace and you won't have to worry about it for years. As for rotors, here's the rub. Whle they cost more than pads, rotors are still pretty inexpensive. A decent rotor can be had for under $50. In my town, it costs $12/rotor to have them resurfaced. And this means carrying them in to the shop. So the best case scenario is that you have to remove them, traipse over to the ship, wait at least an hour for them to to be cut down, then traipse back to your car and reinstall. And the result is rotors that will probably be well under thickness in a couple of years. If you are a "set it and forget it" kind of person, then get new rotors. If you are paying for the work, you shouldn't be charged to install new rotors.

Just make sure that the fluid is changed, too, every 2 years or you will have to replace a caliper, too. Probably the rear. And that will probably mean new pads and rotors.
Nicely said! Thanks for your help.
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