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DIY: Do It Yourself
Post here to share or improve your wrench turning skills! All BMW E46 DIY tips, tales, and projects discussed inside. Learn to work on your car and know the right BMW parts you will need!

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Old 07-20-2013, 09:20 PM   #181
markho
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This was an extremely helpful DIY. Thank you so much! This post, along with this video helped me greatly. I studied them very well before I attempted this procedure. This wasn't very hard at all, just a bit of time.



I also used rtv sealant. I have read that it is possible for the ofhg to continue to leak because of a warped housing unit. An Indy shop confirmed this to me in conversation, and I didn't even bring it up. I didn't want to take any chances.

The hardest part of this job is not the alternator as I had previously feared. The alternator wasn't hard to wiggle off or put back on. In order to put the alternator back on smoothly, while on the bench, you need to put the lower bolt back on the alternator and whack it with a hammer. This will punch in the retainer nut giving you the clearance you need to easily slip the alternator bolt holes into position.I bolted the top one back on first to help me align the bottom one.

The real bitch, and the only procedure that will vary between e46's was the fan. I have an automatic so the fan clutch is bolted to the water pump. I bought the special tool set, and studied this procedure.

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho....php?p=6158587

Then I saw this guy struggling with the tools


Then I saw this vid and other similar videos of doing an old timer method.



So I decided to use the 32mm wrench that came in the tool kit, mount it, and whack it with a hammer. It took me 3 whacks to losen the fan. And break the thermostat housing unit at the same time

But the real PIA was fitting the clutch fan back on properly, the last final step took me like 20 minutes.

All in all this was a great DIY thread. Thanks to all that contributed!

Last edited by markho; 07-21-2013 at 05:48 PM.
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Old 07-21-2013, 10:26 AM   #182
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I have said it a million times. People whacking alternators with hammers, using pickaxes to pry them out, etc, are nuts. All you need are a few washers, a socket (I think it was 23 or 24 mmm), and the right sized and length bolt.

This "tool" will move the retainer nut whenever you need to take the alternator off, or put it back on. With the nut in the proper position, the thing slides in and out freely; a small child could remove it with one hand. If you're hitting resistance, the nut isn't in the proper position.

Search my posts in the DIY forum to find the exact description of the tool (what size socket, washers, and bolt you need). The socket is the most expensive part, but you probably already have that. The bolt and washers are maybe $2 at Home Depot or Lowes.
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Old 07-21-2013, 05:47 PM   #183
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris3Duke View Post
I have said it a million times. People whacking alternators with hammers, using pickaxes to pry them out, etc, are nuts. All you need are a few washers, a socket (I think it was 23 or 24 mmm), and the right sized and length bolt.

This "tool" will move the retainer nut whenever you need to take the alternator off, or put it back on. With the nut in the proper position, the thing slides in and out freely; a small child could remove it with one hand. If you're hitting resistance, the nut isn't in the proper position.

Search my posts in the DIY forum to find the exact description of the tool (what size socket, washers, and bolt you need). The socket is the most expensive part, but you probably already have that. The bolt and washers are maybe $2 at Home Depot or Lowes.
You should really post the link in here to add to this DIY.
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Old 11-02-2013, 10:16 AM   #184
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Can someone tell me where this is covered in the Bentley Manual. I spent a lot of time looking for it and if it weren't for this site I wouldn't have know the torque spec for the 6 bolts.

Thanks.
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Old 11-02-2013, 10:16 AM   #185
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Can someone tell me where this is covered in the Bentley Manual. I spent a lot of time looking for it and if it weren't for this site I wouldn't have know the torque spec for the 6 bolts.

Thanks.

Last edited by PunchBuggy65; 11-02-2013 at 10:20 AM.
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Old 11-02-2013, 01:18 PM   #186
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You don't ned the manual. Its all right here in the thread!
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Old 11-02-2013, 04:51 PM   #187
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I know it's here, I did the job thanks to this thread. I was just wondering if it's in the Bentley. It's a great manual for learning about these cars, but it's kind of frustrating in some ways. Anyway, if it's in there can someone tell me where? I looked some more and now I'm thinking it's nowhere to be found. I noticed that some in this thread talked about the Chilton, but I haven't purchased that yet.
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Old 11-02-2013, 07:13 PM   #188
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Just did this job last night. Went pretty smoothly, probably 4 hours total while taking my time and encountering a couple ... set backs lol. 1. Go ahead and buy a couple new washers for the banjo, (I) fumbled mine twice, the second of which resulted in a total MIA. Set back 2. was completely forgetting to hook the banjo back to the housing... Anyone care to guess what happens when you crank up with an open oil line? Luckily I it only ran for a couple seconds before I noticed the problem, and I have now replaced the oil that went on the floor. Not a bad job over all though if you take your time and don't rush things. Biggest PIA I encountered was coaxing the old gasket out. Mine was so hard and brittle it came out in 10 pieces over the course of 20 minutes.
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Old 11-02-2013, 09:32 PM   #189
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Originally Posted by PunchBuggy65 View Post
Can someone tell me where this is covered in the Bentley Manual. I spent a lot of time looking for it and if it weren't for this site I wouldn't have know the torque spec for the 6 bolts.

Thanks.
16ft lbs
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Old 11-03-2013, 11:02 PM   #190
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twisted125 View Post
Just did this job last night. Went pretty smoothly, probably 4 hours total while taking my time and encountering a couple ... set backs lol. 1. Go ahead and buy a couple new washers for the banjo, (I) fumbled mine twice, the second of which resulted in a total MIA. Set back 2. was completely forgetting to hook the banjo back to the housing... Anyone care to guess what happens when you crank up with an open oil line? Luckily I it only ran for a couple seconds before I noticed the problem, and I have now replaced the oil that went on the floor. Not a bad job over all though if you take your time and don't rush things. Biggest PIA I encountered was coaxing the old gasket out. Mine was so hard and brittle it came out in 10 pieces over the course of 20 minutes.
Mine was so stuck on there I had to use a plastic chisel to remove all the bits along with compressed air to clean it all up. Tedious, but doable.
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Old 11-26-2013, 11:32 PM   #191
Chris3Duke
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markho View Post
You should really post the link in here to add to this DIY.
Just saw this. I did a quick search, and I referenced it a couple of times, but even I can't find it quickly. Sooo...

Here it is:



24 mm 1/2 drive socket
10x50mm bolt (available at Home Depot or Lowes)
A couple of wide washers (I use 5)

Just to summarize how to use it:

- First pull out both the existing bolts in the alternator

- Maneuver the 24mm socket over the back of the alternator. There will be a raised half-hex shape (imagine a hex head cut in half) that it will fit over, which will position the socket perfectly for you.

- Put the bolt through the 5 washers, through the socket, and into the retaining nut that gives everyone trouble.

- Tighten until the alternator moves freely, and just pick it up and remove. Literally, there should be no resistance whatsoever.

- When you reinstall, tightening the alternator bolt will lock the nut back in place.

The tool costs like $2, and makes removing and reinstalling your alternator a breeze.
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Old 11-28-2013, 07:14 AM   #192
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris3Duke View Post

- First pull out both the existing bolts in the alternator

- Maneuver the 24mm socket over the back of the alternator. There will be a raised half-hex shape (imagine a hex head cut in half) that it will fit over, which will position the socket perfectly for you.

- Put the bolt through the 5 washers, through the socket, and into the retaining nut that gives everyone trouble.

- Tighten until the alternator moves freely, and just pick it up and remove. Literally, there should be no resistance whatsoever.

This is a great idea that works - only if you have tiny enough hands to access that lower back end nut of your mounted alternator.

For me I had to go about it another way. Same idea different technique.

From the front after loosening the lower mount bolt 90% of the way I used a mallet to LIGHTLY tap back the bolt. This pushed that locking nut backwards which frees the alternator.

The alternator was still a little tight on the lower mount so I had to wriggle it off a bit even though instructions usually say once the locking nut is cleared the alternator will come right out. It doesn't.






When lifting or prying the alternator out remember to LIFT FROM THE FRONT FIRST (where the alternator pulley is) and then up and out.
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Last edited by delmarco; 12-09-2013 at 04:13 PM.
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Old 11-29-2013, 10:24 AM   #193
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Originally Posted by delmarco View Post
This is a great idea that works - only if you have tiny enough hands to access that lower back end nut of your mounted alternator.
Thanks! I can say this: you don't need small hands, nor is it particularly difficult to get back there. And you don't have to remove anything else you wouldn't normally remove to pull the alternator. I wear a size 10 glove (between a Large and XL), and have done it myself a half dozen times or so.

The only tools required (beyond the little tool I made) are a stubby ratchet and socket that fits over the bolt head. I've done a number of jobs that require working with little clearance, the latest being removing the lower intake Y tube (getting those hose clamps off). This is nothing like that. The only trick to it is you may have to feel for the area where the tool attaches.

I may wind up pulling the alternator today or tomorrow if I have time to replace my OFHG. If I do, I'll take pictures of the tool in action.
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Old 12-06-2013, 03:15 AM   #194
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris3Duke View Post
Just saw this. I did a quick search, and I referenced it a couple of times, but even I can't find it quickly. Sooo...

Here it is:



24 mm 1/2 drive socket
10x50mm bolt (available at Home Depot or Lowes)
A couple of wide washers (I use 5)

Just to summarize how to use it:

- First pull out both the existing bolts in the alternator

- Maneuver the 24mm socket over the back of the alternator. There will be a raised half-hex shape (imagine a hex head cut in half) that it will fit over, which will position the socket perfectly for you.

- Put the bolt through the 5 washers, through the socket, and into the retaining nut that gives everyone trouble.

- Tighten until the alternator moves freely, and just pick it up and remove. Literally, there should be no resistance whatsoever.

- When you reinstall, tightening the alternator bolt will lock the nut back in place.

The tool costs like $2, and makes removing and reinstalling your alternator a breeze.

Actually Chris this didn't work. I went out and bought all the bits (24mm socket/10x50mm bolt/washers) which was not $2 but $12+ for this trick and this was the result:

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Last edited by delmarco; 12-06-2013 at 03:18 AM.
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Old 12-09-2013, 04:14 PM   #195
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Here is a DIY I created to help clear up the Alternator removal confusion on the BMW E46:


BEFORE ATTEMPTING AN ALTERNATOR REMOVAL OR SERVICE FIRST UNPLUG THE NEGATIVE TERMINAL OF YOUR CAR'S BATTERY!!!!!

This write up is for those who have ALREADY removed the car's engine bay air box, engine bay fans, engine belts and now you have gotten to the Alternator and you are stuck on why it remains seized onto the car even though you have removed the two bolts and spent all day wrestling and prying at it.

I explain why BMW E46 Alternators don't come loose even after unbolted and pried before showing how to get an Alternator out of your BMW E46 M54-engine car in 10 minutes or less.*


Tools Needed for this DIY:


1 - One Soft Rubber Mallet ($5 at AutoZone for the 16 ounce one)




2 - One Small Handle Sturdy Ratchet. Once you get the Alternator bolts loose with the Long Handle Ratchet or Breaker Bar use this short handle ratchet to finish un-threading the bolts.



3 - One 16MM 1/2" Socket: ($1 to $5) Socket-to-Ratchet Adapter Sets and Extensions ($2 and up) help as well. You will also need a 17MM Socket to remove the rear nut that holds the battery cable to the back of the Alternator. Remember to UNPLUG the battery in the trunk before doing this.



4 - One Medium to Long Handle Ratchet or 12" to 20" Breaker Bar: Works with 16MM Socket to release Alternator bolts. If you suspect your Alternator bolts will be tightly seized to the car get a 12" to 20" long Breaker Bar ($10 to $15)



5 - One clean Pick Axe - NOT REQUIRED BUT HELPFUL ($20 at Home Depot buy-use-return or borrow one from a friend). This is NOT a substitute for a Pry Bar. I did not use a Pry Bar since I found the Pick Axe to be safer and easier to use than a Pry Bar when it came to 'lifting' the Alternator off the lower mount. I repeat the Pick Axe is NOT A SUBSTITUTE for a Pry Bar.




Things Not Required for this DIY:

- An Ounce of Sweat
- Muscle
- Good Old Elbow Grease
- Alternator Removal anxiety, fear and frustration.




Part 1 -Explaining how the Alternator is mounted in the car:

1. The Alternator's top bolt 16MM is straightforward. You remove it and the Alternator's connection at that bolt is COMPLETELY freed.

2. The Alternator's lower 16mm bolt is NOT straightforward. The bolt's front mount hole is a normal pass thru hole. The bolt's rear mount hole where the bolt threads into is a sliding nut.

This sliding nut slides FORWARD inside the mount hole when the bolt is tightened at the time the Alternator is mounted in the car. The effect of the nut sliding forward is to LOCK the Alternator into place onto the mount.

Here are two pictures showing the bottom mount holes with the rear mount hole's sliding nut 'open' and 'closed'/locked.





3. The issue now is when removing the lower bolt the sliding nut (also called the "holding nut") usually remains in the closed position AFTER the bolt has been removed. So the Alternator is going to be still locked onto the mount after the bolt is removed.

SOLUTION: The technique that worked for me is the "Bolt Tap" method.

After I removed the lower 16MM bolt I inserted it back into it's hole and pushed it all the way back to the rear mount's holding nut.

I threaded the bolt back onto the holding nut using my fingers (about 3 to 4 turns). With the bolt threaded onto the holding nut I began to tap the bolt's head back gently a few times with the Mallet. With the fan out of the way you will have enough clearance to tap at the bolt head firmly. If the mallet head is to broad to reach and strike the bolt head properly then use the small handle ratchet/16MM combo to brace between the bolt and the mallet.

Tapping the bolt back works to loosen the holding nut at the rear lower mount hole thus pushing it backwards into an 'open' position that will free the Alternator.




See video:




Part 2 -
A few firm and gentle taps will push back the holding nut off the mount either all the way or enough to where you can wiggle the Alternator free.

The way the rear holding nut pinches the mount requires the Alternator to be lifted upwards from the front while the rear end remains down in order to free it. If using your hands pull up on the front while keeping the rear end down (but you are still lifting up the rear end at the same time) and wiggling the body laterally side to side to free the beast from it's nest.

The way the Alternator sits and how it's pinched onto the rear lower mount hole via that sliding nut makes a Pry Bar (or long sturdy Philips screw driver) tricky to use. Having an extra set of hands to wiggle the Alternator free while you pry it up may help but my DIY is a sweat free/buddy free DIY so keep reading.

To keep this DIY under 10 minutes get your Pick Axe (again this is NOT a substitute for a pry bar) and get to work. See video:




Part 3 - With the Alternator out the car I am explaining how the bolt tap technique works.



See video.



When replacing the alternator with a brand new one you will not have an issue with the mount hole rear sliding nut being closed. It should be open. If reusing an old or re-manufactured/refurbished Alternator the sliding nut may be closed. To open it you can use the bolt tap technique before mounting the alternator to your car. You should use anti seize lube on the the new bolts and if possible the contacts point of where the incoming Alternator will mount onto your car.

This will make future removals a breeze.



*DISCLAIMER:
Although I thought it was safe to use this method I still want to disclaimer that I went into this DIY not needing to re use the old Alternator and bolts since I was replacing a dead Alternator with a new one. That said, I didn't care if I damaged the old Alternator taking it out.

However in retrospect and by reviewing the technique I used and realizing no damage was done to the old alternator, bolts and engine bay the Mallet and Pick Axe technique would be perfectly safe and effective for those following my instructions as stated below. Although the video instructions are clear as day (a brain dead monkey can follow what I am doing) I am not responsible for your attempts to follow this DIY and any damage you may do to your car.



Honorable Mention for Alternative Alternator Removal:


Some folks have devised another way to get the Alternator out by tacking the lower mount's rear holding nut another way.

Buy these items: one 24MM Socket (1/2" is good), one M10 x 50MM bolt (1" to 1.25" long), a pack of large flat 3/8" M10 steel washers ($12 total at AutoZone).



After the two Alternator bolts have first been removed you will go to the back of the Alternator where from behind you will place a 24MM socket over the lower mount's rear holding nut. The holding nut will protrude slightly at the back find it and place the socket over it.



Then over that 24MM socket place a couple of washers (4 to 5) and after insert the M10x50MM bolt in thru the center hole of washers and the 24MM socket. Then get the tip of the bold onto the holding nut. Begin threading the M10x50MM bolt into the holding nut using a small ratchet/socket combo or wrench. Keep turning the bolt.

The washers and socket ONLY serve to keep the bolt stationary as it threads into the holding nut. Since the bolt is stationary and not moving into the holding nut as you turn the bolt it is the holding nut that moves outwards inside the 24MM towards the bolt.



Keep threading the bolt into the holding nut and the result of this will pull the holding nut outwards into the OPEN position freeing the alternator.

Here is an 'x-ray' example picture example of how the M10 x 50MM bolt looks on the holding nut (remember the 24MM Socket and washers will have to be in place over the M10 x 50MM bolt for this technique to work):

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Old 12-17-2013, 10:00 PM   #196
Chris3Duke
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delmarco View Post
Actually Chris this didn't work. I went out and bought all the bits (24mm socket/10x50mm bolt/washers) which was not $2 but $12+ for this trick and this was the result:

Ha! I am both flattered and impressed you took the time to try to the trick, and even more so, to make the video.

If people still keep having issues, I can make a similar one showing the trick, but for now, let's see if I can use pictures I took a few weeks ago when pulling the alt as part of an OFHG replacement:

So, to start off, in your video, you seemed to be having trouble threading the bolt. I'm assuming this is because of thread pitch. The bolt uses standard pitch, which for an M10 bolt, is 1.5mm. I'm guessing you bought a bolt with fine or extra fine pitch... One thing I did notice was that I measured the bolt I use and it's a 60mm bolt, not 50mm (I suspect it was in the wrong bin at HD). I don't think this would matter (a 50 should still work, you just might need less washers) though.

Second, you mentioned the cost. I'm assuming you have a 24mm socket, which would be the expensive part. The bolt was $1.30, and the washers were about .25 each. So not quite $2, but under $3.

Third, and most important, is the technique. Unfortunately, in your video when you put the socket on (approx 2:04), the camera slips down, so it's hard to get a great view at what you're doing, but the key, is the socket needs to slip over the half-hex protrusion on the alternator, which will line it up so the nut can easily slide inside the socket. The socket is significantly larger than the head on the nut you're pulling, because it also has to account for the half-hex.

Here are the pictures:

I've circled the half-hex protrusion here in red:



I've started threading the bolt, then purposefully pulled the socket back so you can see how it fits. Plenty of room back there to work.



Now, the socket is full on, and completely covering the half-hex:



As you keep tightening the bolt with a ratchet, you will feel the alternator getting looser. As I mentioned, with the nut full retracted, you can simply lift it out with one hand. There will be little to no resistance.

Here's the final shot of the alternator removed, with the tool still in place. Notice that it's making even contact with the back of the alternator. This ensures you're pulling the nut straight out, not at an angle:

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Old 12-17-2013, 10:07 PM   #197
Chris3Duke
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delmarco View Post

Buy these items: one 24MM Socket (1/2" is good), one M10 x 50MM bolt (1" to 1.25" long), a pack of large flat 3/8" M10 steel washers ($12 total at AutoZone).

I just went back and reread your longer post. I was right. Your screws are M10-1.25 x 50mm. 50mm is the length, 1.25 is the thread pitch, which is "fine". You want 1.5mm, which is "standard". I should have specified that in my original post.

If you get a chance, maybe edit your post so no one makes a mistake and screws up the threads on their alt.

Also note, I think the socket has to be 1/2" drive (not 3/8"), in order for the bolt to pass through it. I'm not sure it will fit through a 3/8" hole. You mentioned 1/2" is good, but you may want to call it out as a requirement.

Last edited by Chris3Duke; 12-17-2013 at 10:09 PM.
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Old 12-21-2013, 04:49 PM   #198
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris3Duke View Post
I just went back and reread your longer post. I was right. Your screws are M10-1.25 x 50mm. 50mm is the length, 1.25 is the thread pitch, which is "fine". You want 1.5mm, which is "standard". I should have specified that in my original post.

If you get a chance, maybe edit your post so no one makes a mistake and screws up the threads on their alt.

Also note, I think the socket has to be 1/2" drive (not 3/8"), in order for the bolt to pass through it. I'm not sure it will fit through a 3/8" hole. You mentioned 1/2" is good, but you may want to call it out as a requirement.
Thanks Chris for clearing it up.

The issue was indeed the thread pitch. My bolt's was too fine to work the nut loose.

I edited my DIY write up to reflect your changes:

____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________

BEFORE ATTEMPTING AN ALTERNATOR REMOVAL OR SERVICE FIRST UNPLUG THE NEGATIVE TERMINAL OF YOUR CAR'S BATTERY!!!!!

This write up is for those who have ALREADY removed the car's engine bay air box, engine bay fans, engine belts and now you have gotten to the Alternator and you are stuck on why it remains seized onto the car even though you have removed the two bolts and spent all day wrestling and prying at it.

I explain why BMW E46 Alternators don't come loose even after unbolted and pried before showing how to get an Alternator out of your BMW E46 M54-engine car in 10 minutes or less.*


Tools Needed for this DIY:


1 - One Soft Rubber Mallet ($5 at AutoZone for the 16 ounce one)




2 - One Small Handle Sturdy Ratchet. Once you get the Alternator bolts loose with the Long Handle Ratchet or Breaker Bar use this short handle ratchet to finish un-threading the bolts.



3 - One 16MM 1/2" Socket: ($1 to $5) Socket-to-Ratchet Adapter Sets and Extensions ($2 and up) help as well. You will also need a 17MM Socket to remove the rear nut that holds the battery cable to the back of the Alternator. Remember to UNPLUG the battery in the trunk before doing this.



4 - One Medium to Long Handle Ratchet or 12" to 20" Breaker Bar: Works with 16MM Socket to release Alternator bolts. If you suspect your Alternator bolts will be tightly seized to the car get a 12" to 20" long Breaker Bar ($10 to $15)



5 - One clean Pick Axe - NOT REQUIRED BUT HELPFUL ($20 at Home Depot buy-use-return or borrow one from a friend). This is NOT a substitute for a Pry Bar. I did not use a Pry Bar since I found the Pick Axe to be safer and easier to use than a Pry Bar when it came to 'lifting' the Alternator off the lower mount. I repeat the Pick Axe is NOT A SUBSTITUTE for a Pry Bar.




Things Not Required for this DIY:

- An Ounce of Sweat
- Muscle
- Good Old Elbow Grease
- Alternator Removal anxiety, fear and frustration.




Part 1 -Explaining how the Alternator is mounted in the car:

1. The Alternator's top bolt 16MM is straightforward. You remove it and the Alternator's connection at that bolt is COMPLETELY freed.

2. The Alternator's lower 16mm bolt is NOT straightforward. The bolt's front mount hole is a normal pass thru hole. The bolt's rear mount hole where the bolt threads into is a sliding nut.

This sliding nut slides FORWARD inside the mount hole when the bolt is tightened at the time the Alternator is mounted in the car. The effect of the nut sliding forward is to LOCK the Alternator into place onto the mount.

Here are two pictures showing the bottom mount holes with the rear mount hole's sliding nut 'open' and 'closed'/locked.





3. The issue now is when removing the lower bolt the sliding nut (also called the "holding nut") usually remains in the closed position AFTER the bolt has been removed. So the Alternator is going to be still locked onto the mount after the bolt is removed.

SOLUTION: The technique that worked for me is the "Bolt Tap" method.

After I removed the lower 16MM bolt I inserted it back into it's hole and pushed it all the way back to the rear mount's holding nut.

I threaded the bolt back onto the holding nut using my fingers (about 3 to 4 turns). With the bolt threaded onto the holding nut I began to tap the bolt's head back gently a few times with the Mallet. With the fan out of the way you will have enough clearance to tap at the bolt head firmly. If the mallet head is to broad to reach and strike the bolt head properly then use the small handle ratchet/16MM combo to brace between the bolt and the mallet.

Tapping the bolt back works to loosen the holding nut at the rear lower mount hole thus pushing it backwards into an 'open' position that will free the Alternator.




See video:




Part 2 -
A few firm and gentle taps will push back the holding nut off the mount either all the way or enough to where you can wiggle the Alternator free.

The way the rear holding nut pinches the mount requires the Alternator to be lifted upwards from the front while the rear end remains down in order to free it. If using your hands pull up on the front while keeping the rear end down (but you are still lifting up the rear end at the same time) and wiggling the body laterally side to side to free the beast from it's nest.

The way the Alternator sits and how it's pinched onto the rear lower mount hole via that sliding nut makes a Pry Bar (or long sturdy Philips screw driver) tricky to use. Having an extra set of hands to wiggle the Alternator free while you pry it up may help but my DIY is a sweat free/buddy free DIY so keep reading.

To keep this DIY under 10 minutes get your Pick Axe (again this is NOT a substitute for a pry bar) and get to work. See video:




Part 3 - With the Alternator out the car I am explaining how the bolt tap technique works.



See video.



When replacing the alternator with a brand new one you will not have an issue with the mount hole rear sliding nut being closed. It should be open. If reusing an old or re-manufactured/refurbished Alternator the sliding nut may be closed. To open it you can use the bolt tap technique before mounting the alternator to your car. You should use anti seize lube on the the new bolts and if possible the contacts point of where the incoming Alternator will mount onto your car.

This will make future removals a breeze.



*DISCLAIMER:
Although I thought it was safe to use this method I still want to disclaimer that I went into this DIY not needing to re use the old Alternator and bolts since I was replacing a dead Alternator with a new one. That said, I didn't care if I damaged the old Alternator taking it out.

However in retrospect and by reviewing the technique I used and realizing no damage was done to the old alternator, bolts and engine bay the Mallet and Pick Axe technique would be perfectly safe and effective for those following my instructions as stated below. Although the video instructions are clear as day (a brain dead monkey can follow what I am doing) I am not responsible for your attempts to follow this DIY and any damage you may do to your car.



Honorable Mention for Alternative Alternator Removal:


Some folks have devised another way to get the Alternator out by tacking the lower mount's rear holding nut another way.

Buy these items: one 1/2" 24MM Socket, one M10 x 50MM bolt (1" to 1.25" long) with a 1.5mm standard thread pitch, a pack of large flat steel washers with a center hole wide enough for the bolt to pass through and wide enough to lay flat against the back of the socket







After the two Alternator bolts have first been removed you will go to the back of the Alternator where from behind you will place a 24MM socket over the lower mount's rear holding nut. The holding nut will protrude slightly at the back find it and place the socket over it.






Then over that 24MM socket place a couple of washers (4 to 5) and after insert the M10x50MM bolt in thru the center hole of washers and the 24MM socket. Then get the tip of the bold onto the holding nut. Begin threading the M10x50MM bolt into the holding nut using a small ratchet/socket combo or wrench. Keep turning the bolt.



The washers and socket ONLY serve to keep the bolt stationary as it threads into the holding nut. Since the bolt is stationary and not moving into the holding nut as you turn the bolt it is the holding nut that moves outwards inside the 24MM towards the bolt.

Keep threading the bolt into the holding nut and the result of this will pull the holding nut outwards into the OPEN position freeing the alternator.



Here is an 'x-ray' example picture example of how the M10 x 50MM bolt looks on the holding nut (remember the 24MM Socket and washers will have to be in place over the M10 x 50MM bolt for this technique to work):

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Last edited by delmarco; 12-21-2013 at 05:06 PM.
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Old 12-21-2013, 10:30 PM   #199
Chris3Duke
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Old 03-01-2014, 12:51 PM   #200
techsan40
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First off I am a noob so be kind. Had my oil changed at an Indy shop and about 500 miles later I noticed a small leak. Took it back and he said his mechanic said it looked like the VCG so I followed the very helpful DIY and did it myself. Leakage continued so I finally had time today to check out the OFHG and after pulling off my air box discovered that bolts were missing from the OFHG. Is there any reason these should've been taken off for a simple oil change? Just want to know my facts before I go talk to them.
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