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DIY: Do It Yourself
Post here to share or improve your wrench turning skills! All BMW E46 DIY tips, tales, and projects discussed inside. Learn to work on your car and know the right BMW parts you will need!

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Old 02-24-2012, 12:11 AM   #1
jjrichar
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Project M54 Engine: Timing tools 2

Timing Tools 2

Link to other parts of the project
http://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=899347


Tool 11 3 240 Camshaft locking tool

Do you need it: yes
Can you make your own: yes

What it looks like





This is an important part of the timing setup. It is used to show when the camshafts are correctly positioned at TDC. The tool is actually two separate parts that can be bolted together if required. Normally they wouldn't be connected. If the cams are in the correct position, the tool sits flush against the head at the back. Note: it's not to lock the cam so you can apply torque at the other end of the camshaft. It's just there to tell you if the cam is positioned correctly. If the cam needs to be rotated, or torque applied to it, then it needs to be held by a 24 mm wrench about halfway down the camshaft.

The pieces that you need have to be sanded perfectly flat, and sometimes square to this flat side. This is how I did it. If you can buy perfectly square and flat pieces of MDF, half your luck. As you can see, I've used plywood for the task, because this is all I can get my hands on.











Special tools

Tool 11 6 180 Secondary sprocket setup tool

Do you need it: no

What it looks like





This is tool that is just designed to save time when putting the engine together, and to stop the sprockets being put incorrectly by someone who doesn't care and wants to get to the pub on a friday afternoon after work.

Pretty simple. Just count the number of chain pins between the two points shown.












Special tools

Tool 11 2 300 Crankshaft locking tool

Do you need it: yes
Can you make it: yes

What it looks like





This fits down the back of the engine to lock the crankshaft at TDC. I haven't made one of these as I can't get hold of the correct size dowel, and also I don't need one. The flywheel is off my engine due to it being on an engine stand, so locking it with this tool is not possible. I lock it in another way, which is not relevant here.

The hole in the block that this goes into is 12mm. The hole in the flywheel is 8mm. Hence why the tool is this shape.

If I needed one, how would I make it? Get a piece of 12 mm wood dowel that's about 20cm long. Drill a 7mm hole in its end, exactly in the center and 10 mm deep. Now get an 8mm bolt that is threaded only half way down the bolt. Cut it off with and angle grinder so that there is about 10mm of the thread remaining. Now thread the bolt into the end of the dowel, so that you can't see any of the thread. Now cut the bolt off so that 5mm of it is sticking out. Get your angle grinder and lightly grind the sharp edge of the bolt stub so that is will easily go inside the flywheel hole. Now cut the other end of the dowel to the correct length and drill a hole in the end so you can pull it out with a hook tool.

Note: This tool is not designed for you to put any force on (like removing the nut at the front of the crankshaft). It's only there to check that the engine is in the correct position.

Here are the dimensions.






Other tools that are quoted for the job that are not required






This just puts the required torque on the tensioner dummy. See above for the solution







This holds down the camshaft locking tool. Not required as long as you are not trying to use locking tool to counter the torque you are putting on the camshaft.







When this is fitted and compressed air applied, it pushes the vanos pistons to their default positions (intake away from camshaft, exhaust towards camshaft). They should already be in this position after shutting down the car. I think it also pushes some of the oil out of the vanos. No big deal having some oil in the vanos when removed, and even if the pistons are not in this position, it makes no difference to its removal. The exhaust piston will always be inward due to the spring. If the intake piston needs to be pushed it can be done with your finger.
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Old 03-11-2012, 09:07 PM   #2
veli510
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What happens if the sprockets are off? Car feel slow?
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Old 03-15-2012, 07:41 AM   #3
jjrichar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by veli510 View Post
What happens if the sprockets are off? Car feel slow?
I'm assuming that you mean that the timing is not correct, not that the sprockets are not fitted.

I'm no expert, but having pulled this apart and played with it over and over, this is what I think. I may be wrong, and if there is anyone out there who knows better, please correct me.

My answer is at the end, but I'll explain how I get there.

When I pulled apart the VANOS and looked at the pistons and chambers they fit into, I could see on the exhaust chamber from subtle wear marks that the total movement of the piston when in operation was about 6mm. However the total available movement of the exhaust piston was 10mm, 4mm more than was actually used during operation (2mm maximum error at each end of the piston's movement). It didn't go to the full extent of its travel when operating. The intake piston chamber didn't have any wear marks that I could see, so I couldn't confirm the same thing. I would assume the design is similar. For interest, the intake piston can move a total of 16mm. When I did some testing of the splined shaft movement due to piston movement, the angular rotation of the camshaft is 12 degrees for every 10mm of piston movement. 1.2 degrees per 1mm of piston movement. It is the same for both sides.

As I described in the thread I wrote on the timing, When you are doing the timing, you are setting up components on the exhaust side only. It does however affect the timing on both sides. You are getting the main sprocket, inner spline, and exhaust sprocket bolted together correctly. If the inner spline is incorrect in relation to the main sprocket, the exhaust timing will be incorrect. If the exhaust sprocket is incorrect in relation to the main sprocket the intake side will be wrong.

As far as what the car senses, it has no idea of the vanos piston position. Nothing senses this. It only senses camshaft position, and applies oil pressure to the vanos piston to move them until the camshaft is sensed to be correct. As long as the piston has the movement available to make this happen, the will engine will perform as advertised.

If the timing is incorrect and the piston gets to its maximum travel prior to getting the camshaft position correct, this is where the problems will occur. What will happen? Due to this affecting emissions, my guess you will get a check engine light, and the car will give you some vanos or timing related codes, as well as engine performance degradation.

As I said above, from what I could see there could be at least a total of 2.4 degrees of total error in how the sprockets and inner spline are set up. More error than this may lead to the issues above.

Hope this helps

Last edited by jjrichar; 03-16-2012 at 12:25 PM. Reason: error
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Old 03-15-2012, 11:19 AM   #4
aggieE46
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You can totally put force on the pin. I used it when removing and torquing on the install of my ATI damper as well as torquing the flywheel to crank bolts. No issues.
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Old 03-15-2012, 01:41 PM   #5
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Thanks for the reply. I just recently did my head gasket and I believe I did my timing wrong. My car has check engine light and it feels slower. The code I got is p0015 which is timing related issue beig related. Thanks for the informative reply.

I am going to redo the timing for my car this weekend. I hope I get it right


Quote:
Originally Posted by jjrichar View Post
I'm assuming that you mean that the timing is not correct, not that the sprockets are not fitted.

I'm no expert, but having pulled this apart and played with it over and over, this is what I think. I may be wrong, and if there is anyone out there who knows better, please correct me.

My answer is at the end, but I'll explain how I get there.

When I pulled apart the VANOS and looked at the pistons and chambers they fit into, I could see on the exhaust chamber from subtle wear marks that the total movement of the piston when in operation was about 6mm. However the total available movement of the exhaust piston was 10mm, 4mm more than was actually used during operation (2mm maximum error at each end of the piston's movement). It didn't go to the full extent of its travel when operating. The intake piston chamber didn't have any wear marks that I could see, so I couldn't confirm the same thing. I would assume the design is similar. For interest, the intake piston can move a total of 16mm. When I did some testing of the splined shaft movement due to piston movement, the angular rotation of the camshaft is 12 degrees for every 10mm of piston movement. 1.2 degrees per 1mm of piston movement. It is the same for both sides.

As I described in the thread I wrote on the timing, When you are doing the timing, you are setting up components on the exhaust side only. It does however affect the timing on both sides. You are getting the main sprocket, inner spline, and exhaust sprocket bolted together correctly. If the inner spline is incorrect in relation to the main sprocket, the exhaust timing will be incorrect. If the exhaust sprocket is incorrect in relation to the main sprocket the intake side will be wrong.

As far as what the car senses, it has no idea of the vanos piston position. Nothing senses this. It only senses camshaft position, and applies oil pressure to the vanos piston to move them until the camshaft is sensed to be correct. As long as the piston has the movement available to make this happen, the will engine will perform as advertised.

If the timing is incorrect and the piston gets to its maximum travel prior to getting the camshaft position correct, this is where the problems will occur. What will happen? Due to this affecting emissions, my guess you will get an check engine light, and the car will give you some vanos or timing related codes, as well as engine performance degradation.

As I said above, from what I could see there could be at least a total of 2.4 degrees of total error in how the sprockets and inner spline are set up. More error than this may lead to the issues above.

Hope this helps
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Old 03-16-2012, 04:53 AM   #6
jjrichar
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Do you have the correct tools to do the timing, or are you planning to make them? If you are planning to make them I'd appreciate some feedback on how well they worked.
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Old 03-16-2012, 08:09 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjrichar View Post
Do you have the correct tools to do the timing, or are you planning to make them? If you are planning to make them I'd appreciate some feedback on how well they worked.
Yea, I bought majority of the tools off ebay. I figured maybe if I learn how to do all this correctly I'll be able to work on other people's e46s.

Oh yea, on another side note. If anyone is replacing head gasket make sure to replace the inlet pipe. Mine is leaking bad and it needs to be replaced.
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Old 11-04-2012, 01:40 PM   #8
wardpower
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When my head gasket blew I bought BMW genuine M54/M52TU timing tools off of eBay from a retiring mechanic. Did it as well as I could and my timing was still a little bit off when I had a BMW mechanic check it later. It was tough for me because the gear sprockets didn't slide in and out very easily when I hooked the vanos jig up. I agree that the camshaft locking fixture seemed like something you could just make. I even wonder if you just kept a crescent wrench on each one and eyeballed it as straight as you could how well it would turn out.

On a self serving note my tools are available for rent/loan to any of my fellow fanatics in need.
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Old 02-07-2014, 02:37 AM   #9
mortezamech
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parden me i need some technichal information about valveteronic system and how to assemble it could you help me? thanks in advance for your assisstance
please inform me
my email:mortezamech23@yahoo.com
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Old 02-07-2014, 04:33 AM   #10
jjrichar
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Unfortunately I have no experience of the valvetronic engine, so I am unable to help you
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