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Old 02-04-2009, 08:24 PM   #21
tracerit
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EXCELLENT DIY! Thanks for the time and pictures
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Old 02-05-2009, 11:17 AM   #22
GoingNuts
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What I neglected to do previously was to extract the hazard light and central locking switch from the central console and disconnecting it before dismantling the latter. The switch block had a metal clip on either side that could be flattened to release the block. Once released, it could then be disconnected.



TIS suggested taking down the foot-well light panel on the passenger side. I took it down and could not work out why it was necessary. This could be one of the instances where the TIS creator erred while napping on the job. The arrow pointed to the front of the car. The square marked the location of the foot-well light. I could not disconnect the light fitting from its wire. So I took the light fitting out of the foot-well panel instead. The circles marked the location of a metal clip that the dash trim slotted into. I thought it was easier to slot the dash trim into the clip while the foot-well panel was already mounted than to clip the foot-well panel to the dash trim while the trim was already mounted.
In any case, accessing this panel would be needed when changing the foot well light bulb.




The interior side of the foot-well panel had a couple of 'forks' that were slotted into 'hooks' on the under-side of the control modules housing behind the glovebox. The arrow indicated the direction to the front of the car.
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Old 02-05-2009, 11:48 AM   #23
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Here is a location of the hood stop I was referring to Sound can transfer in a weird way.

Sorry Camera phone pics. Last shot was just a general shot of the back of our shop(simply for the hell of it)
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Old 02-05-2009, 12:16 PM   #24
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I started reading this by myself. Now I have coworkers hanging over my shoulder wanting to see what happens next.

You're like an action hero yelling "I'm going IN". People are hanging around the forum waiting to cheer, hoping you emerge victorious!
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Old 02-05-2009, 12:22 PM   #25
GoingNuts
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Originally Posted by jbeurotech View Post
Here is a location of the hood stop I was referring to Sound can transfer in a weird way.

Sorry Camera phone pics. Last shot was just a general shot of the back of our shop(simply for the hell of it)

I certainly would not rule out anything, and will take a look at the hood stop. The noise I am looking for could be from many things, one of which sounded like a piece of plastic moving or shifting position every so often. I have come so far, and that dash is coming off one way or another.
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Old 02-05-2009, 12:25 PM   #26
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I certainly would not rule out anything, and will take a look at the hood stop. The noise I am looking for could be from many things, one of which sounded like a piece of plastic moving or shifting position every so often. I have come so far, and that dash is coming off one way or another.
no problem just mentioned it as I had a dash out of a car under warranty for a noise only to find the hood stop was the cause. That sucked as BMW payed only for the hood stop adjustment and I got screwed on all the other labor!!! Oh well live and learn. Nice pics BTW looks real good! When you get the dash all the way out you will see a metal support bar cover that bar in felt as the dash rubs on that and squeals as well. Every dash i take out gets that done to prevent rattles latter.
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Old 02-05-2009, 01:48 PM   #27
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As I wanted to do as much preparation work as possible without disabling the car, I did this step without taking off the steering wheel. This made it slightly more difficult/risky. The goal in this step was to take off the upper and lower plastic cover for the steering column. I tried the TIS procedure and failed. So I went my own way.


This pictures was inserted into this post at a later point. There was an expansion rivet that secured the top cover to the steering column. This rivet should have been taken off before manipulating the upper and lower covers. As I didn't, I ripped a small piece off the top cover resulting in the rectangular hole. The ripped off piece could be remounted in the hole to hold the top cover in place when installing. The hold would not be as good as when the piece was still part of the cover.



There were a couple of screws at the bottom of the driver side storage compartment. These held the dash trim to the driver foot-well panel. Also shown was a third screw next to the door that held the dash trim to the hidden dash skeleton. This third screw existed on both sides of the car. Although its position relative to the other 2 screws here depended on if the car was left hand or right hand drive. These screws were released.



With the steering column fully extended out and at the highest position it would go, two expanding rivets on the lower cover could then be accessed. By pressing in the center studs, these rivets were unlocked. I left them hanging in the cover.



The area of the foot-well panel under the steering column were pulled off from a couple of metal clips on either side of the steering column. These clips were mounted on the dash trim.



A close view of the right hand clip. The left hand clip was similar. In this picture the driver side storage compartment was dismounted. This may not be necessary, and I thought the compartment could be taken out along with the dash trim as a single piece.



I grabbed the back of the lower cover and gave it a light pull. Then the back of the lower cover was separated from the back of the top cover. However the front of the lower cover refused to separate from the upper cover. I proceeded to rip them apart with increasing force. Eventually they came apart. I was concerned if I had damaged them. But since they were relatively small and uncomplicated pieces, buying replacements should not be too expensive.



With the lower cover removed, the upper cover could be peeled back to reveal what was underneath. The circles marked the rivets that secured the cover to the dash trim. The rivets resembled an open crocodile's jaw. By closing the jaws with a pair of small pliers I was able to disconnect the cover from the trim. The squares marked the loops that the lower cover hooked on to. These were only slightly damaged and could be used again.



With the covers taken off, I could then analyse why it was so difficult to get them apart. The arrow indicated the direction where the steering wheel would have been. A loop on the top cover and a hook on the bottom cover. Nothing complicated there ...



... ahh, the complication was to do with a couple of studs on the lower cover that inserted into holes in the top cover. This made it impossible to push the loop away from the hook from out side of the cover casings. On hindsight I thought it would be easier to take these covers off with the steering wheel off. Then a small flathead could be used to pry the loop off the hook before the stud was pried out of the hole.
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Old 02-06-2009, 10:41 AM   #28
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I hope you don't end up with more rattles than you started with once your journey is complete. When you have it all put back together please have someone ride along and film your expressions once the moment of truth arrives...

...will it be fixed!! or will it be fail'?
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Old 02-06-2009, 11:15 AM   #29
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It guys working on cars = Big fail.... LOL I think he is anal enough that it will be right as long as he remebers to add felt to the metal bar and puts every bolt back in.
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Old 02-06-2009, 11:21 AM   #30
GoingNuts
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Well this IT guy don't have felt, don't know where to buy them. There will be no fail either. Don't be impatient now. The final episode will be here soon.
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Old 02-06-2009, 11:23 AM   #31
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This step required the battery to be disconnected and a wait of 1 minute. Older model cars require a longer wait.

TIS explicitly advised against using a sharp object for this, but I thought I knew better, and used the smallest flathead watch screwdriver I had and inserted it into the middle of the trim strip for the front windscreen pillar trim. It was inserted to no more than 5 or 6mm deep. The reason a sharp object should not be used was because the trim might be punctured and the airbag hidden behind might be damaged. The reason I used a sharp object was because I couldn't see any more effective way. It could be barely made out on the picture that 'Airbag' was stamped on the strip. That marked the central location of the strip.



The trim strip was pried open without any damage. There were upward facing hooks on the back of the strip all along its length that secured it to the pillar trim.



Once an opening was made, the top side of the strip was pushed down to allow the hooks to unhook. Then the bottom side of the strip could be pried out to lift the hooks.



It was difficult to get a handle on the strip near its end. So a creditcard (actually this was my insurance card; but same difference) was inserted to the top side to push the strip down to unhook.




The trim strip was removed revealing the slots that the hooks hooked into as well as 3 torx T20 screws. These were probably T21 or T22 as a T20 bit fitted quite loosely and a T25 was too big. These screws were very long and stayed tight all the way until they came out. It took a lot of effort and time to get them out as there was very little room to work with, and the torx bit was slipping and the screw heads were stripping. I also droped my screwdriver and ratchet a couple of times. I didn't like these screws at all. TIS stated the torque for these screws was 2Nm.




With the screws released, the trim was first pulled directly away from the pillar to unsecure it from some plastic tabs behind. Then using the leading edge (right in the corner where the front windscreen met the side window that met the dash trim) of the trim as a pivot, the trim was pushed forward toward the font of the car to unclip it from a metal clip right next to the side air vent. Then using the unclipped edge as a pivot, the trim was pulled towards the back of the car to lift it out.




With the trim removed, the head airbag was revealed.




The circle marked a tab with a hole in the dash trim where the pillar trim was inserted into (this was the first of the two aforementioned pivots). The existence of this tab was the reason for taking out the pillar trim. The arrow pointed to the location of the metal clip that the pillar trim had to be unclipped from (the second pivot).



This procedure was repeated for the right hand side pillar.
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Old 02-06-2009, 11:35 AM   #32
jbeurotech
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BMW makes a nice hard fiber card that works great for that. here is some felt tape http://www.findtape.com/product278/J...info=felt+tape just put it on the contact spots. BTW no real reason to disconnect the Airbag for that step.

They are T20 screw some cheaper torx bits tend to slip get a good snap-on bit and it bits fine. Also most of the time you need a smaller bit so that you get a stright shot at it.
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Old 02-07-2009, 12:52 PM   #33
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This step required the battery to be disconnected and/or the right fuse pulled.

The Aircon control panel was taken out by pushing from its back on both sides.



Four sets of wires were plugged into the back of the panel. Each of these had a uniquely shaped connector and matching socket. So reconnecting them wrong would not be possible. I tied these wires together to remind myself they belonged together.



With the exception of the large connector, the other connectors could just be pulled out after pressing on the release tabs on their sides. The large connector had a special locking mechanism. This was when it was locked.



This was when it was unlocked.
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Old 02-07-2009, 03:39 PM   #34
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This step required the battery to be disconnected and a wait of 1 minute. Older model cars require a longer wait.

Behind the steering wheel at 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock positions were a couple of holes where a rod could be inserted to unlock the driver airbag. The rod should be blunt and ideally roughly the size of the hole. A pointed rod such as a screwdriver, or a rod that was too thin would make the task more difficult. An Allen key of the right length and thickness might work. I grabbed the nearest rod I could find, which was the extension for my stethoscope, and used that. The rod was inserted with the outside end pushed towards the front of the car, so that the end inside the hole was angled towards the driver. The rod met its target approximately 3.5cm into the hole. The target was a spring of moderate strength. Care must be taken to ensure the rod was pressing against the spring and not something else. Otherwise the rod could be stabbing at something else and damaging it. This was why a blunt rod should be used. Once something springy could be felt, the correct contact was made. The spring had to be pressed-in 1 to 2cm to unlock the airbag. It also helped to dislodge the airbag when I lightly pried at it with my hand from the front while the spring was pressed in. The airbag must be unlocked from one side then the other.



The top arrow indicated the rod I was using. In this picture it was horizontal and did not make contact with the spring. The bottom arrow indicated the part of the spring the rod should be pressing against. The red dot indicated the rough location where contact could be made between the rod and the relevant part of the spring. The rod must angle slightly downwards to make contact. The spring could be seen in its locked state.



Contact was made. The rod (top arrow) could be seen angled downwards. The spring (bottom arrow) could be seen being pushed right-wards to the unlock position. In this position, the front of the airbag cover could be pried (pulled) so that the back of it came away from the spring.



Two power connectors at the back of the airbag unit. The plugs were colour-coded to match their respective sockets.



The connector was unlocked using a small flat head.



Back of the airbag unit. Not realising at the time that this was staring a loaded cannon down its barrel. Had the airbag gone off at this point, the metal base would have been fired off like a cannon ball. The consequence would be bye bye noob. Let's hope no one else try this foolishness. The base of the airbag should point at all times, including when setting down on the floor, away from living things.



With the airbag removed, the central bolt on the steering wheel could be taken off. The correct installation torque for this was 62.5Nm.



Underneath the bolt were grooves in the metal showing how the steering wheel should be align to the steering shaft. The circles marked the connectors that must be disconnected before the steering wheel could be taken off.



With the steering wheel taken off, the stalk assembly was revealed. Four torx screws mounted the assembly to the steering column. These were not load-bearing in any significant sense and the torque for these was unknown. These were loosened.



One connector on the left and one on the bottom of the stalk assembly that required disconnection.



One connector on the right of the stalk assembly required disconnection.



The stalk assembly taken off. The only thing that could be in the way of the dash trim, as it exits, was the ignition key receptacle.
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Old 02-08-2009, 01:59 PM   #35
GoingNuts
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The single screw securing the light switch box was released.



With the driver storage box unmounted, The light switch box could be pushed up and out from below.



The connector used the same locking mechanism as the large connector on the aircon control panel explained previously.



Switch box was disconnected and out.


After a couple of torx screws at the top of the instrument cluster were released. The cluster could be pried out easily.



A couple of connectors at the back, with the now familiar locking mechanism, were disconnected.



First surprise: nothing to see behind the cluster. The circles indicated the locations of the afore-mentioned torx screws.
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Last edited by GoingNuts; 02-08-2009 at 02:12 PM.
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Old 02-08-2009, 02:27 PM   #36
Irish46
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And I thought I hated rattles! Fair play for going to all this work, if (when) this is a success....... youll be a legend
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Old 02-08-2009, 02:51 PM   #37
GoingNuts
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I don't think anyone dislikes rattle more than me. Rattles make me go completely nuts is the easiest way to describe it, and I would be willing to rip the entire car apart to get at them.

The rattle I was looking for was found, and it was quite an anticlimax. That will be revealed at the end. For now, I'll just finish what I started.

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Old 02-08-2009, 02:55 PM   #38
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Four screws on the plastic dash console frame were released.



While keeping the dash trim down, the central vent was pushed up at the location indicated and pulled outwards. Same push and pull was made on the same location on the right of the vent to dismount the vent from the dash. Some effort was required as the vent was suck on to the ducting behind because of glue.



A belly up view of the central vent piece. The arrow indicated the tab that secured the vent to the dash trim. The indicated surface was in contact with the inner side of the dash trim.



The circles indicated more tabs that secured the vent to the dash trim. Before disconnecting the temperature control cable, a metal clip (green arrow) had to be taken off. Then the red piece (blue arrow) was rotated 90 degrees to reveal an open crocodile jaw rivet. Closing the jaw allowed the cable to come free. Finally the cable was oriented in such a way that its end could be unhooked from the vent.



With the plastic frame that was below the central vent removed, the solar sensor cable was revealed. This was disconnected from the bundle of wires for the aircon control panel.
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Old 02-08-2009, 03:10 PM   #39
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Good DIY. How much time would you say you've put into this so far?
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WTB: Complete e46 M3 rear end

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Old 02-08-2009, 03:27 PM   #40
GoingNuts
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Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: London
Posts: 7,253
My Ride: 2004 330Ci
Quote:
Originally Posted by hi its me alec View Post
Good DIY. How much time would you say you've put into this so far?
A couple of hours a day since I started. I don't believe the actual mechanical work takes too long. As I am working blind at various points because of bad info from TIS and unclear info from other DIYs, I took a lot of time-outs for head scratching. The car was in a driveable condition all the way up until when the driver airbag was removed. So I wasn't in any hurry.

Although now my entire dash is in pieces, I am giving it slightly more urgency. I might just put the airbags and the steer wheel back, then duct tape the instrument cluster somewhere and see how well that runs. I am quite keen to test drive to ensure all the rattles are out before I put the dash back on.
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