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Old 05-03-2013, 01:32 AM   #326861
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Interesting, but this is just freshen, not swap... sweet anyways. I wantz third pedal...

But first I need to address oil seepage, Vanos issues, o2 sensors, leaky headlight washers..
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Old 05-03-2013, 01:58 AM   #326862
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Perhapos by this time you might offer a chance to wayward no show customers with cars that sometimes wont start for a week but typically just stall all the time...
There's always hope.
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i'd rather be gapless with no bulge
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Old 05-03-2013, 01:59 AM   #326863
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Iron Man 3 at 11 or 11:30?

We can eat dinner or something beforehand.

If somehow we screw it up and get there late Oblivion and Pain and Gain (DYEL? the film) are good alts.
This is tomorrow night, right?
Probably 11:30.
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i'd rather be gapless with no bulge
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Old 05-03-2013, 02:00 AM   #326864
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Old 05-03-2013, 02:02 AM   #326865
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Yes.. I trust they are notn in the way or I could come and fetch them.. honestly I was hoping to beg forgiveness and get back on your sched after Bfest as it sounded you were too busy until thereafter... I've been travelling for work such that car is not really being driven...
Not a problem.
After bimmerfest, I think.
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Old 05-03-2013, 02:12 AM   #326866
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Matt, you're here and can ramble on a good random topic, so what are you opinions on soldiers in WW2? What were their lives like, how were they affected, what was war like for them etc.
I'm assuming you mean US vets? For, say, French and UK vets it was somewhat different given the destruction of their homelands by the Germans... As for anyone overrun in the war or those fighting for the Axis nations of course. But working with that assumption...

I've read a decent amount, my dad was in Tokyo just after the end of the war, his dad was a bigtime WW1 hero (yes we stretch the shite out of some generations lol, even though he died young at 56 my dad was born in 1927.. long time ago!), I have an uncle who was a medic in Vietnam who lost his best friend [in person, ferociously] right after they got shipped over (neither he nor my grandfather ever talk[ed] about it apparently, but things get passed along and that behavior in and of itself speaks volumes....).

I think in a pure sense like any war they were shocked, terrified, likely never the same if they saw combat duty, lost siblings, were exposed directly to those who did as medical staff, transport, etc. Horrible memories they had to try to unsee, tons of alcoholism and ptsd thereafter, let alone anyone who was a POW or anything like that...

For the average GI I think it was distinctly unlike any war thereafter. We saved the world from the Nazis and Japanese (debate it all you want but it's true). We to a certain extent avenged Pearl Harbor. It had to be horrible knowing so many people who had been killed and there were SO many, go walk around Colma military cemetery sometime, so many lost in Pacific theater, shiploads of guys who never made it back, thousands upon thousands and the world was literally a smaller place (see population figures 1941 vs 2013, insane). They were heroes and that had to feel good coming home, they came back and settled into, populated and built the safe feeling era of the 50s and 60s. I think even by the time Korea had rolled around people were already starting to question the govt in sending troops in as now we have every time (any duly so....) but there was no guilt over WW2, they had a job to do and a tough bloody one and they went and did it like heroes, then came home and didn't go to therapy for it or talk it out in group session as they would now (though likely they did at places like VFW Halls etc), they just moved on...

Again, I think it's a very different experience when you're talking combat vets vs others, not that noncombat vets didn't matter, I just think that's an immeasurable difference in their view of it all...

I think the avg noncombat vets felt pretty good. They did what they had to do, unquestioningly served their nation and came home to heroes reception and a chicken in every oven, massive growth in American culture (insert glory days of American driving experience). There were plenty who like a Jack Kerouac were already questioning classic values... but I think by and large those who didn't suffer the scars of battle felt it was a tough thing to go through and appreciated all the lives lost more than anyone who was in the shite... but, winning the war brought us as a nation incredible power and it was an era of good feelings nationally as the economy boomed and people moved on and had families; guys took the trades they'd learned in the service and built careers, businesses... still, I think there was among the resolve of having done a good job a sense of loss related to the time sacrificed and distances traveled. Foiled plans, lost relationships, lost opportunities from beforehand, even think about guys like Ted Williams and all the other pro athletes who missed years of the primes of their careers etc. For some guys like George HW Bush it made them huge heroes (shot down twice and survived, what a stud, even if his son sent soldiers into harms way just to protect the financial interests of oil companies and defense contractors, easily the least qualified CiC ever given his own efforts to shirk his duties).

For anyone who was close to battle I'm sure it was, as in any conflict, the biggest thing in their lives and they never truly moved on, I mean it had to haunt you. It was a bloody awful nasty dirty war (as are all but even worse then given the types of fighting and weapons I'd imagine). They had to try to come back into civilized society after being exposed to man at his most savage basic animalism, you can bet that's not done easy. Tons of guys had huge issues with PTSD I'm sure and no one had a name for it back then. I can't imagine killing a lot of people with your bare hands and then just moving back into a normal life... many likely suffered huge mental anguish and disorder and there was not the same thinking toward treating such issues back then, they were just supposed to deal with it... rough.

I mean, I guess it was likely very much like vets of any war feel, very mixed emotions at having tried to do a good job but going through the horrors of war... the biggest difference I think was likely the way they were viewed and could view themselves as heroes. We've not had a conflict since where there was really just the unanimous support in our society that they had done a great great service to all of mankind, let alone all Americans, for having stopped the evil empires...

For a guy like my dad who was by no means a fighter by nature, though his dad certainly was, and who was more of a curious mind plunked down in a very foreign world just after it ended, it was a feeling of good service to his country. I'm sure it was still pretty scary and seeing the affects of the atomic bombs and an entire society at having given up and lost so much for going into a war as an aggressor was certainly sad and eye opening and not exactly a paid vacation. He was proud to have done it and read every freakin book about it and saw every movie 100 times and basically knew everything about it, and he would have said it was a huge terrible sacrifice on both sides but that we as Americans could be proud that we'd stopped something truly hideous, and not simply Nazis and the Holocaust but also all the terrible things that say the Japanese had visited upon China and SEast Asia prior to the war...

I'd bet more than anything it made the guys feel lucky to have survived the dangerous times and happy to be free and have a chance to build a good life honestly back here in the states, have a bunch of kids, punch in a good days work at the job, eat a square meal, maybe have a beer or two, repeat and never complain for the understanding of something much much worse...

My sense is that it was the biggest thing in all of their lives and most people's of those times and they thought about it every day all the time and tried to make peace with it to varying degrees of success...

Fack, I remember the Gulf War popping off my senior year in HS and filing for selective service and fearing that who knew I might be drafted and have to go fight in some horrible hot desert against a foe I didn't really know much about and whom it seemed had the primary evil of living in a country who had oil we wanted/needed/didnt like paying too much for... it sure as heck didn't feel like anyone would be saving the world (forgive me Kuwaitis) and I know I wanted no fn part of it and was honestly terrified at the prospect...

I hope they felt gratified that the rest of the country was extremely grateful, and we should be to this day. Seems sometimes like the French and to a lesser degree the English haven't taken too long to forget that. No that they need to kiss OUR butts or something, We didn't do it, but our grandfathers and fathers etc sure did. I'm not a big fan of us getting into ANY armed aggression that's not ABSOLUTELY necessitated and I don't support how or why we ended up in Iraq again or god help us Afghanistan, certainly not independent of UN activities...

But, shoot, i hope the guys alive to this day and there's not many left feel like heroes to whom the world will always owe a debt of thanks. I know I do.
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Old 05-03-2013, 02:28 AM   #326867
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One sec. Let me read that through.
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i'd rather be gapless with no bulge

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Old 05-03-2013, 02:32 AM   #326868
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Hmm, interesting analysis. I think it's true many people believed they were fighting justly. Contrast that with the wars that followed and the lines are very blurred.
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i'd rather be gapless with no bulge

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Old 05-03-2013, 02:59 AM   #326869
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Lol I'm taking a music class over the summer

Also, I noticed in FGC some of them are going to see Iron Man 3, anyone in NGC wanna go?
Im down, tomorrow night?
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Old 05-03-2013, 02:59 AM   #326870
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Holy word dump Batman! But I should expect it since I asked for it

"Thirty percent of the grade will be based on an essay on the experiences of soldiers in combat in World War II. Two books have been assigned: E. B. Sledge's With the Old Breed and Charles B. MacDonald's Company Commander. The former is the account of a marine enlisted man who fought in the Pacific, the latter an account of an army officer who led troops in Europe. The paper should compare and contrast the experiences of these two men as examples of the nature of combat during World War II. Students are encouraged to do additional reading to add additional perspectives from other books or documentaries (such as the Ken Burns 2007 World War II documentary). If you know World War II veterans you can interview, or have relevant materials (letters and other papers) from family members, such material may also be brought into your essay.

The objective of the assignment is to encourage critical thinking and effective writing about the impact of the war on the lives of those who fought in it. The papers will be graded on the depth of analysis, organization, quality of writing, and proper use of notes and bibliography."

^That is my paper. The teacher said we can be pretty free with it, I just wanted to get someone's take on it.
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Old 05-03-2013, 03:11 AM   #326871
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Holy word dump Batman! But I should expect it since I asked for it

"Thirty percent of the grade will be based on an essay on the experiences of soldiers in combat in World War II. Two books have been assigned: E. B. Sledge's With the Old Breed and Charles B. MacDonald's Company Commander. The former is the account of a marine enlisted man who fought in the Pacific, the latter an account of an army officer who led troops in Europe. The paper should compare and contrast the experiences of these two men as examples of the nature of combat during World War II. Students are encouraged to do additional reading to add additional perspectives from other books or documentaries (such as the Ken Burns 2007 World War II documentary). If you know World War II veterans you can interview, or have relevant materials (letters and other papers) from family members, such material may also be brought into your essay.

The objective of the assignment is to encourage critical thinking and effective writing about the impact of the war on the lives of those who fought in it. The papers will be graded on the depth of analysis, organization, quality of writing, and proper use of notes and bibliography."

^That is my paper. The teacher said we can be pretty free with it, I just wanted to get someone's take on it.

Interesting assignment interesting class... I'd have to read the two books, along with different theaters of war, what are differences in roles? I'd expect one big difference is fighting to liberate occupied nations who wanted us there in EU, and fighting island to island in So Pac where Japanese were more engrained foriegn rulers or where little life was seen beforehand... differences in fighting styles of enemies... ground battles vs battleships? Hot vs cold too...

Wars is a bitch.
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Old 05-03-2013, 03:11 AM   #326872
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Also feel free to cred in bibliography.. lol. Nighty night.
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Old 05-03-2013, 03:30 AM   #326873
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Alas...

Oh sadness, for missing Mires, I haz done a bad thing...
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Old 05-03-2013, 03:43 AM   #326874
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Interesting assignment interesting class... I'd have to read the two books, along with different theaters of war, what are differences in roles? I'd expect one big difference is fighting to liberate occupied nations who wanted us there in EU, and fighting island to island in So Pac where Japanese were more engrained foriegn rulers or where little life was seen beforehand... differences in fighting styles of enemies... ground battles vs battleships? Hot vs cold too...

Wars is a bitch.
Well the class is literally WW2

The guy in Europe is a commander in the army, guy in pacific is just a marine grunt. Both from 1944 until the end of the war. I want to use Band of Brothers, I need to watch The Pacific, and I am tempted to look at others. I was thinking of comparing how while they were in two separate war zones they were going through similar issues
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Old 05-03-2013, 03:44 AM   #326875
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I'm assuming you mean US vets? For, say, French and UK vets it was somewhat different given the destruction of their homelands by the Germans... As for anyone overrun in the war or those fighting for the Axis nations of course. But working with that assumption...

I've read a decent amount, my dad was in Tokyo just after the end of the war, his dad was a bigtime WW1 hero (yes we stretch the shite out of some generations lol, even though he died young at 56 my dad was born in 1927.. long time ago!), I have an uncle who was a medic in Vietnam who lost his best friend [in person, ferociously] right after they got shipped over (neither he nor my grandfather ever talk[ed] about it apparently, but things get passed along and that behavior in and of itself speaks volumes....).

I think in a pure sense like any war they were shocked, terrified, likely never the same if they saw combat duty, lost siblings, were exposed directly to those who did as medical staff, transport, etc. Horrible memories they had to try to unsee, tons of alcoholism and ptsd thereafter, let alone anyone who was a POW or anything like that...

For the average GI I think it was distinctly unlike any war thereafter. We saved the world from the Nazis and Japanese (debate it all you want but it's true). We to a certain extent avenged Pearl Harbor. It had to be horrible knowing so many people who had been killed and there were SO many, go walk around Colma military cemetery sometime, so many lost in Pacific theater, shiploads of guys who never made it back, thousands upon thousands and the world was literally a smaller place (see population figures 1941 vs 2013, insane). They were heroes and that had to feel good coming home, they came back and settled into, populated and built the safe feeling era of the 50s and 60s. I think even by the time Korea had rolled around people were already starting to question the govt in sending troops in as now we have every time (any duly so....) but there was no guilt over WW2, they had a job to do and a tough bloody one and they went and did it like heroes, then came home and didn't go to therapy for it or talk it out in group session as they would now (though likely they did at places like VFW Halls etc), they just moved on...

Again, I think it's a very different experience when you're talking combat vets vs others, not that noncombat vets didn't matter, I just think that's an immeasurable difference in their view of it all...

I think the avg noncombat vets felt pretty good. They did what they had to do, unquestioningly served their nation and came home to heroes reception and a chicken in every oven, massive growth in American culture (insert glory days of American driving experience). There were plenty who like a Jack Kerouac were already questioning classic values... but I think by and large those who didn't suffer the scars of battle felt it was a tough thing to go through and appreciated all the lives lost more than anyone who was in the shite... but, winning the war brought us as a nation incredible power and it was an era of good feelings nationally as the economy boomed and people moved on and had families; guys took the trades they'd learned in the service and built careers, businesses... still, I think there was among the resolve of having done a good job a sense of loss related to the time sacrificed and distances traveled. Foiled plans, lost relationships, lost opportunities from beforehand, even think about guys like Ted Williams and all the other pro athletes who missed years of the primes of their careers etc. For some guys like George HW Bush it made them huge heroes (shot down twice and survived, what a stud, even if his son sent soldiers into harms way just to protect the financial interests of oil companies and defense contractors, easily the least qualified CiC ever given his own efforts to shirk his duties).

For anyone who was close to battle I'm sure it was, as in any conflict, the biggest thing in their lives and they never truly moved on, I mean it had to haunt you. It was a bloody awful nasty dirty war (as are all but even worse then given the types of fighting and weapons I'd imagine). They had to try to come back into civilized society after being exposed to man at his most savage basic animalism, you can bet that's not done easy. Tons of guys had huge issues with PTSD I'm sure and no one had a name for it back then. I can't imagine killing a lot of people with your bare hands and then just moving back into a normal life... many likely suffered huge mental anguish and disorder and there was not the same thinking toward treating such issues back then, they were just supposed to deal with it... rough.

I mean, I guess it was likely very much like vets of any war feel, very mixed emotions at having tried to do a good job but going through the horrors of war... the biggest difference I think was likely the way they were viewed and could view themselves as heroes. We've not had a conflict since where there was really just the unanimous support in our society that they had done a great great service to all of mankind, let alone all Americans, for having stopped the evil empires...

For a guy like my dad who was by no means a fighter by nature, though his dad certainly was, and who was more of a curious mind plunked down in a very foreign world just after it ended, it was a feeling of good service to his country. I'm sure it was still pretty scary and seeing the affects of the atomic bombs and an entire society at having given up and lost so much for going into a war as an aggressor was certainly sad and eye opening and not exactly a paid vacation. He was proud to have done it and read every freakin book about it and saw every movie 100 times and basically knew everything about it, and he would have said it was a huge terrible sacrifice on both sides but that we as Americans could be proud that we'd stopped something truly hideous, and not simply Nazis and the Holocaust but also all the terrible things that say the Japanese had visited upon China and SEast Asia prior to the war...

I'd bet more than anything it made the guys feel lucky to have survived the dangerous times and happy to be free and have a chance to build a good life honestly back here in the states, have a bunch of kids, punch in a good days work at the job, eat a square meal, maybe have a beer or two, repeat and never complain for the understanding of something much much worse...

My sense is that it was the biggest thing in all of their lives and most people's of those times and they thought about it every day all the time and tried to make peace with it to varying degrees of success...

Fack, I remember the Gulf War popping off my senior year in HS and filing for selective service and fearing that who knew I might be drafted and have to go fight in some horrible hot desert against a foe I didn't really know much about and whom it seemed had the primary evil of living in a country who had oil we wanted/needed/didnt like paying too much for... it sure as heck didn't feel like anyone would be saving the world (forgive me Kuwaitis) and I know I wanted no fn part of it and was honestly terrified at the prospect...

I hope they felt gratified that the rest of the country was extremely grateful, and we should be to this day. Seems sometimes like the French and to a lesser degree the English haven't taken too long to forget that. No that they need to kiss OUR butts or something, We didn't do it, but our grandfathers and fathers etc sure did. I'm not a big fan of us getting into ANY armed aggression that's not ABSOLUTELY necessitated and I don't support how or why we ended up in Iraq again or god help us Afghanistan, certainly not independent of UN activities...

But, shoot, i hope the guys alive to this day and there's not many left feel like heroes to whom the world will always owe a debt of thanks. I know I do.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 323ci newbie View Post
Holy word dump Batman! But I should expect it since I asked for it

"Thirty percent of the grade will be based on an essay on the experiences of soldiers in combat in World War II. Two books have been assigned: E. B. Sledge's With the Old Breed and Charles B. MacDonald's Company Commander. The former is the account of a marine enlisted man who fought in the Pacific, the latter an account of an army officer who led troops in Europe. The paper should compare and contrast the experiences of these two men as examples of the nature of combat during World War II. Students are encouraged to do additional reading to add additional perspectives from other books or documentaries (such as the Ken Burns 2007 World War II documentary). If you know World War II veterans you can interview, or have relevant materials (letters and other papers) from family members, such material may also be brought into your essay.

The objective of the assignment is to encourage critical thinking and effective writing about the impact of the war on the lives of those who fought in it. The papers will be graded on the depth of analysis, organization, quality of writing, and proper use of notes and bibliography."

^That is my paper. The teacher said we can be pretty free with it, I just wanted to get someone's take on it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by hizhinezz View Post
Interesting assignment interesting class... I'd have to read the two books, along with different theaters of war, what are differences in roles? I'd expect one big difference is fighting to liberate occupied nations who wanted us there in EU, and fighting island to island in So Pac where Japanese were more engrained foriegn rulers or where little life was seen beforehand... differences in fighting styles of enemies... ground battles vs battleships? Hot vs cold too...

Wars is a bitch.
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Old 05-03-2013, 04:12 AM   #326876
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Old 05-03-2013, 09:15 AM   #326877
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Old 05-03-2013, 10:03 AM   #326878
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Old 05-03-2013, 10:34 AM   #326879
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Old 05-03-2013, 10:41 AM   #326880
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Side note Iron Man was gud. Little thing at the end of credits.
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