E46 BMW Social Directory E46 FAQ 3-Series Discussion Forums BMW Photo Gallery BMW 3-Series Technical Information E46 Fanatics - The Ultimate BMW Resource BMW Vendors General E46 Forum The Tire Rack's Tire Wheel Forum Forced Induction Forum The Off-Topic The E46 BMW Showroom For Sale, For Trade or Wanting to Buy

Welcome to the E46Fanatics forums. E46Fanatics is the premiere website for BMW 3 series owners around the world with interactive forums, a geographical enthusiast directory, photo galleries, and technical information for BMW enthusiasts.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

Go Back   E46Fanatics > Tuning & Tech > Suspension & Braking Forum by BimmerWorld

Suspension & Braking Forum by BimmerWorld
Have some questions about suspension or brake setups for your E46 BMW? Get all your answers here!
Sponsored by BimmerWorld

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rating: Thread Rating: 1 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
Old 12-28-2015, 11:14 AM   #1
Geo31
Ironman
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: The Woodlands, TX, USA
Posts: 2,769
My Ride: 98 M-Z3, 01 325iT
Review: ECS Tuning Swaybar Kit

  • Summary
  • Review of the swaybars as received and what is included
  • Installation using the procedure on the ECS site with tips and observations
  • Actual installation review: how easy/hard, and any issues
  • Driving impressions
  • What a swaybar does and doesn't do, and what it means to the driver.


Summary:

The ECS swaybar kit for the E46 is well engineered (with one small exception noted in the details below) and finished nicely. The installation of the front bar is as easy as it gets. The installation of the rear bar requires some patience, but it is not what I would call hard. This is a kit easily installed by someone with modest prior wrenching experience, and even a novice should be able to complete the job with relatively little fuss (hopefully my notes below will help).

The vehicle dynamics/performance effects are subtle, but quite beneficial with no downside. I think most drivers will like the change the addition of the ECS swaybar kit brings. It won't make you or your car a super hero, but it will make spirited driving much more enjoyable. In short, it's well worth the time and money invested.

As received and what is included:

The swaybars arrive double boxed with jumbo bubble wrapping, in an outer box roughly 2'x6'x6". The swaybars aren't exactly fragile, but the extra protection of double boxing is appreciated. Inside the outer box you'll find two boxes, one each for the front and rear bars, as well as a bag with two packages of thick lubricant. The box for each swaybar also includes the required bushings. Each swaybar is wrapped in heavy plastic, protecting the finish. What is not currently offered is a kit that includes the rear end links that almost certainly will need to be replaced. While this gives the buyer the opportunity to purchase whatever end links they like, ECS regularly offers kits with selected parts. In my opinion, ECS should offer a kit that includes end links for the buyer's convenience. Admittedly this is a small issue. A+ all around here.







See the ECS web page for more excellent photos.

https://www.ecstuning.com/BMW-E46-32...Bar/ES2831192/

The swaybars are finished in red powdercoating. This not only looks good, but powdercoating is tougher than paint and will protect the bars quite well. The bushings are formed with a metal mesh on the ID to prevent "sticktion" between the bars and the bushing. This is very important because for a swaybar to work as intended, it should be able to move very freely in the bushings, else you introduce additional unplanned spring rate into your suspension. While the installation instructions call for the bushings to be installed dry, I used some of the ample lube provided to pre-lube the bushings/bars. A+ all around once again.



Installation using the procedure on the ECS site:

I found three tools to be quite useful that you may want to add to the list of required tools in the instructions. First, I found it useful to have two 3/8" ratchets. You could get by with one, but two will make installation easier in my opinion. Next is a 13mm gear wrench. I used mine a LOT with this installation (more on that as we get to the guts of the installation). Lastly, I found a 3/8" socket extension to be useful in a few areas.

I did not use my " ratchet or sockets (a " ratchet and socket are called for in the tools list).

Otherwise, the tool list is accurate and complete in my opinion.

The front swaybar removal and installation went down exactly as described in the instructions. Textbook. This is as easy as installing aftermarket performance parts get. The only exception is that on the passenger side end links, I found I could not use a socket wrench on the end link because the headlight auto-leveler was in the way. I could have disconnected or removed it, but it was far easier to use my 13mm gearwrench. A+ on the instructions for the front bar.

The rear swaybar removal and installation proved a bit trickier and I deviated from the instructions somewhat.

I found the end link brackets, where they attach to the control arm, to be the first tricky bit. I could not use a socket wrench on the forward bolts on either side. Once again, my 13mm gearwrench came to the rescue. I won't kid you, this was not a simple job, but not a hard one either. Patience was required, but I got it done easily enough. Removal of the swaybar brackets was by the numbers. No sweat.

The instructions say that pulling down the exhaust slightly may be required to remove the swaybar. I found I needed to unbolt the muffler mounting bolts. This allowed enough movement of the exhaust to make the job easily accomplished. With the car on stands, there just isn't enough room to maneuver the bar to get it out without unbolting the muffler (someone may have accomplished this, but it will be FAR easier to unbolt the muffler mounts). I should note if you look closely at the photos in the instructions, the muffler is actually removed in the photos. It is not necessary to go this far in my opinion, but unbolting the mounts is.

One other thing I found useful was to twist the end links parallel to the bars to facilitate removal. It meant you needed less room to wiggle the bar out, but it takes a little effort to get the oldend links to move on the bar (at least with mine), but it's worth the effort.

I did not reuse my end links, and given the age of all E46 at this time, I suggest you do not either. Thankfully there are plenty of choices available. Once again, it would be nice if ECS offered a kit that came with them (but again, not a big deal). I did not use silicone spray to install the new end links as called for in the instructions, but instead, coated the end of the new swaybar with a little of the provided lube. Installing the new end links took some effort and it seemed like they were just NOT going on, but with a little perseverance they popped on and were easy to maneuver all the way onto the bar. A little patience is necessary here, but there should be no worries. Once the end links are on the bar, attach the mounting bracket (make sure you have the orientation correct - see instructions) and then twist the links parallel to the bar for easier installation.

It's best at this time to install the bushings. While the instructions state they can be installed dry, I again added some of the lube provided. I found it easier to install the bushing with the gap in the bushing facing upward due to the way the bushing clamps install.

The installation was somewhat easier than the removal with one catch. On my rear bar, the last bend on the bar did not match that of the stock bar. This caused the mounting bracket to not quite line up right. They were still easily installed, but required introducing some twist (and stress) on the end links and fasteners. It's probably not enough to worry about, but with swaybars, you want them to be quite free in their movement to work at their best. I contacted ECS and included this photo and suggested they look into this; they indicated they will do so. As I said, it's not a show stopper, but it would be better if the bends were more accurate. I found the holes in the bracket were off by about 4-5mm as a result. This was fairly easily overcome, but shouldn't be necessary.



At this point you should have the swaybar installed and only have to bolt the muffler brackets back in place. One word of caution here. The studs on the chassis have a little unthreaded portion on the end that should facilitate getting the nuts back on. I had no issue with 3 of the 4. The last (forward, outboard) was a bit tricky to align properly and I had a hard time getting the nut on without cross-threading. This is NOT an issue with the ECS kit, but something to be careful about. Once it starts cross-threading, it is hard to stop it. If you have skinny arms and small hands, it will be easier to get your hands up there. The other three nuts I was able to get started with my 13mm socket on an extension, working by hand.

Actual installation review - how easy/hard, and any issues:

I would rate installation degree of difficulty as 4/10 (really 3/10 +1 for PITA factor). The front bar is as easy as it gets. The rear bar requires some patience. There is nothing terribly difficult, but if you're not the patient type, it has its frustrations. The only real issue I found was the final bends on the rear bar, and they did complicate installation slightly.

For background, I have built and worked on race cars, modified many road cars, including suspension installations and multiple engine swaps. I think I can call myself an experienced shade-tree mechanic. The entire installation took me 4.5 hours, start to finish. It could definitely be done more quickly, but I'd plan on at least 3 hours, absolute minimum with 4 hours being more likely. If you are a novice wrencher, I'd plan on a full day. Everyone's experience will be different, but I didn't find anything that caused me real problems, so 4-4.5 hours is probably a good estimate. If you are a novice, you should not be intimidated by this installation unless you simply want little to nothing to do with wrenching on your own car. Then again, if that is your position, I'm not sure why you're reading this.

A+ for the front bar installation, solid B for the rear bar (most of which has nothing to do with the ECS kit).

Driving impressions:

My initial impressions after one day of driving with the new swaybars was quite favorable. The experience is subtle, but noticeable, at least for me, but I've done my share of racing and as such, am tuned into small changes in set-up.

What I found initially is the car is more responsive to steering inputs, as expected. One thing that stood out that I wasn't actually anticipating was the responsiveness to steering input while already cornering. It is much improved and I certainly appreciate this change.

After driving with the new swaybars for a while, with a good mix of around town and open road freeway driving, I am completely comfortable saying there is no downside to this kit. It has no bad manners in ride and handling, nor in noise, vibration, and harshness. The improvement in responsiveness is appreciated more every day. I do notice the reduction in body lean in corners, but that is somewhat more a matter of driver comfort (see next section). I can recommend this kit without hesitation.

What a swaybar does and doesn't do, and what it means to the driver:

If you're like me, you've read much about how swaybars tie one side of the car to the other and reduce body lean, etc., etc.

All of that is fine, but mostly it's not entirely useful, per se, at least not how people typically think of it. For one thing, it doesn't reduce load transfer (more on that later).

Swaybars are basically torsion bars that act when one side of the suspension reacts differently from the other side. Torsion bars are another form of spring. The "problem" with a swaybar is that it becomes an undamped spring when it comes into play. Functionally, this tends not to be a big issue, but it's enough to be wary of bars that are too large in rate (for practical purposes on a road car, this means diameter). They also tend to reduce the independence of the suspension, which is at odds with other desires for a well-engineered suspension. In short, there are always trade-offs.

There are holy wars fought over springs vs. swaybars. I don't intend to fight that war. There are those who feel a car should have relatively soft springs and large swaybars and those who believe the opposite. For what it's worth, I believe swaybars are for subtle tuning, not gross tuning. The ECS swaybar kit fits my desire for a swaybar set. I notice subtle and useful changes, but not gross changes. From a practical standpoint, it means you can jump into your car with the new swaybars and find it generally reacts like you expect with some pleasant improvements.

The old story about tying one side of the car to the other just doesn't really come into a technical/engineering discussion other than to say swaybars have no effect until one side of the suspension is doing something different from the other side (for example, if both sides of the suspension are in compression, or vise-versa, the swaybars have no effect).

Swaybars do indeed reduce body lean. Reducing body lean does improve cornering, but let's explore why. It may not be what you think. When the body of the car leans in a corner, the suspension will move into a part of the geometry that is less than ideal, especially on a car equipped with McPherson struts, like the E46 has in the front. This is why a stiffer front swaybar does wonders for an E46. It tends to limit the suspension from entering a terrible place in the camber curve that is detrimental to the best grip. From the point of view of the driver in the seat, the reduced body lean is simply a side benefit.

Swaybars do NOT change the total load transfer while cornering (OK 99.9% they don't). The only thing swaybars affect in the load transfer equation (lateral acceleration x CG height x mass/track width) is the center of gravity height, and that effect is generally negligible. So, swaybars do not affect total load transfer. What they do affect is the rate of load transfer (as do spring rates). This does a couple of things. First, if you vary the thickness of the bars, the load transfer rate will change front to back affecting understeer/oversteer. The other thing it does is settle the chassis quicker. It's this last thing that drivers find more comfortable. They spend less time anticipating the ultimate load transfer. This makes most drivers more comfortable and thus increases the driver's performance envelope. It also makes the car more responsive to steering control inputs. This is something almost all drivers like, regardless of the ultimate handling.

In general, those things that make a driver more comfortable increases the driver's confidence, and thus, their personal performance envelope. It's not a given however. For driving on public roads, this is a good thing, but please keep your exploration of your and your car's limits to HPDE.

In summary....

"If the amount of roll generated by a given lateral acceleration has no real effect on load transfer, then why worry about it? There are two reasons:
1. ...roll causes unfortunate wheel cambers which strongly affect tire adhesion.
2. The generation of chassis roll takes a finite period of time, during which load is transferring and camber angles are changing. The shorter we can make this time, the more positive and stable will be the vehicle's response to changes in direction" --Carroll Smith, Tune to Win

If you would like to know more about vehicle dynamics and the tuning of such, I highly recommend you get a copy of Tune to Win and read it. Then read it again with a highlighter. It's the racer's bible.
__________________
George Roffe

Swim: 2.4 Miles
Bike: 112 Miles
Run: 26.2 Miles
Brag: For the rest of your life



Last edited by Geo31; 12-28-2015 at 12:28 PM.
Geo31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Ads by Google

Guests, get your FREE E46Fanatics.com membership to remove this ad.
Old 12-28-2015, 12:08 PM   #2
Solidjake
Zero. Leaks.
 
Solidjake's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC
Posts: 30,177
My Ride: '02 330i 6MT
Very detailed review, thanks for the time to make it
Solidjake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2015, 04:45 PM   #3
ECSTuning
Sponsor
 
ECSTuning's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Wadsworth, Ohio
Posts: 9,657
My Ride: BMW
cliffsnotes - George likes them... a lot

Thanks for the feedback!

-James
__________________

Have questions? Need answers? Live Chat us! 8:30am to 12:00am Midnight EST
sales@ecstuning.com | customerservice@ecstuning.com
Customer Service Hours: M-F 8:00am-8:00pm EST|Saturday: 10:00am-7:00pm EST
Sales Team Hours: M-F 8:00am-11:00pm EST|Saturday: 10:00am-7:00pm EST |800.924.5172
Click HERE to read what people are saying about ECS Tuning
ECSTuning is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2015, 06:46 PM   #4
Geo31
Ironman
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: The Woodlands, TX, USA
Posts: 2,769
My Ride: 98 M-Z3, 01 325iT
Quote:
Originally Posted by ECSTuning View Post
cliffsnotes - George likes them... a lot

Thanks for the feedback!

-James
And for all the right reasons. They tick the right boxes.
__________________
George Roffe

Swim: 2.4 Miles
Bike: 112 Miles
Run: 26.2 Miles
Brag: For the rest of your life


Geo31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2015, 10:50 PM   #5
CarbonZHP
Because Race...Convertible?
 
CarbonZHP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 2,186
My Ride: used to be an auto
Im on an M3 stock front (26) and stock sport vert rear (20). The 2 mil front bump really did wonders.
__________________
Modification Thread
Original Car: Silver Grey on Grey, A/T (1 of 186)
As it sits: Silver Grey on Black, M/T (1 of 51)
Instagram: @CarbonZHP
CarbonZHP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2015, 01:02 PM   #6
jacob220
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: queens
Posts: 136
My Ride: 2003 325i 5spd
Aren't the sway bar brackets prone to failure while using a thicker bars?


Sent from BimmerApp mobile app
__________________
jacob220 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2015, 01:19 PM   #7
Rob43
Performance Suspension Guru
 
Rob43's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Richmond VA
Posts: 7,869
My Ride: 03 331Ci 5spd R1200R
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacob220 View Post
Aren't the sway bar brackets prone to failure while using a thicker bars?


Sent from BimmerApp mobile app

No, not really.



Rob43
__________________



Rob #43 ITS/ITR/STU, BMW 325I, STU LAP RECORD
SUMMIT POINT WV 1:24:229 SCCA
(DynoDynamics https:vimeo.com/8486878 Dyno Video)
"Chance Favors The Prepared Mind"

I BUILD SUSPENSIONS (Consult) FROM MILD TO WILD FOR RWD & Xi E46's
Quote:
Originally Posted by RacerX View Post
Nitrous is a little trickier than boost, but it's not the spray that kills motors, it's STUPIDITY!!
I Know How To Fix The Rear "Bouncing" Problem On Your Cheap Coilovers Like: Jom RL FK SE & RK.
Rob43 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2015, 01:24 PM   #8
CarbonZHP
Because Race...Convertible?
 
CarbonZHP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 2,186
My Ride: used to be an auto
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacob220 View Post
Aren't the sway bar brackets prone to failure while using a thicker bars?


Sent from BimmerApp mobile app
Never heard of that.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
__________________
Modification Thread
Original Car: Silver Grey on Grey, A/T (1 of 186)
As it sits: Silver Grey on Black, M/T (1 of 51)
Instagram: @CarbonZHP
CarbonZHP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2015, 02:46 PM   #9
Geo31
Ironman
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: The Woodlands, TX, USA
Posts: 2,769
My Ride: 98 M-Z3, 01 325iT
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacob220 View Post
Aren't the sway bar brackets prone to failure while using a thicker bars?


Sent from BimmerApp mobile app
I've seen one post about that happening. That makes it more of an anomaly than a real issue. It could have had something to do with the installation as well.

A swaybar is a torsion bar that rotates and twists about the central axis. I cannot imagine a force under normal circumstances that would cause this issue.
__________________
George Roffe

Swim: 2.4 Miles
Bike: 112 Miles
Run: 26.2 Miles
Brag: For the rest of your life


Geo31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2015, 04:37 PM   #10
jacob220
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: queens
Posts: 136
My Ride: 2003 325i 5spd
Thanks for clarifying. I was kind of skeptical about them. That's why I was only considering the Hotchkis sway bar kit.


Sent from BimmerApp mobile app
__________________
jacob220 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2015, 04:42 PM   #11
Rob43
Performance Suspension Guru
 
Rob43's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Richmond VA
Posts: 7,869
My Ride: 03 331Ci 5spd R1200R
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacob220 View Post
Thanks for clarifying. I was kind of skeptical about them. That's why I was only considering the Hotchkis sway bar kit.

Sent from BimmerApp mobile app

Both have their pros & cons....




Rob43
__________________



Rob #43 ITS/ITR/STU, BMW 325I, STU LAP RECORD
SUMMIT POINT WV 1:24:229 SCCA
(DynoDynamics https:vimeo.com/8486878 Dyno Video)
"Chance Favors The Prepared Mind"

I BUILD SUSPENSIONS (Consult) FROM MILD TO WILD FOR RWD & Xi E46's
Quote:
Originally Posted by RacerX View Post
Nitrous is a little trickier than boost, but it's not the spray that kills motors, it's STUPIDITY!!
I Know How To Fix The Rear "Bouncing" Problem On Your Cheap Coilovers Like: Jom RL FK SE & RK.
Rob43 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2015, 05:29 PM   #12
Geo31
Ironman
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: The Woodlands, TX, USA
Posts: 2,769
My Ride: 98 M-Z3, 01 325iT
The Hotchkis bars are nice bars. While they are larger diameter, their effective rate will be somewhat lower due to them being hollow. Hollow swaybars are nice because they are lower mass than the equivilent rate solid bars. Just wanted to let you know this fact because while it may appear on the surface they are just that much stiffer, they are not. I cannot give you the comparison of the two in terms of rates, so they may have the same effective rate or may not. They should be lower mass though.

While the ECS kit uses bushings with the mesh on the ID to prevent "sticktion," the Hotchkis use a Zerk fitting for regular maintenance with a grease gun (to keep the swaybars working correctly and to reduce NVH). I installed Zerk fittings in my ST swaybars on my Sentra SE-R. It's a time-honored solution.

I like the end links provided with the Hotchkis set. They are very nice and the rear bar is also adjustable, which is also nice.

The Hotchkis bars are a nice set. Ya makes yer choices and pays yer money. If I were racing I'd consider the Hotchkis for a budget set (for an all-out set, I'd use 3-pc racing swaybars). For the road, it's hard to beat the price/performance equation with the ECS set.
__________________
George Roffe

Swim: 2.4 Miles
Bike: 112 Miles
Run: 26.2 Miles
Brag: For the rest of your life


Geo31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2015, 01:30 PM   #13
zander271
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 3,269
My Ride: 6spd ZHP/5sp XI
Review: ECS Tuning Swaybar Kit

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacob220 View Post
Thanks for clarifying. I was kind of skeptical about them. That's why I was only considering the Hotchkis sway bar kit.


Sent from BimmerApp mobile app

As Rob and Geo states they have Pros and cons. I have the Hotchkis front and rear sway bars. I liked the fact they are adjustable so I could dial them in along with hollow and light. My settings are mid front and soft rear. Rob had me dial the rear back and bit and it tidied things up.

As Geo said a hollow swaybar is not as stiff as a solid, but it's lighter and needed to be larger to make up for the loss in strength. Both are great bars for the street. Most people if they are looking to save some $$ just need to upgrade the bushings to polys and will get an improvement over stock.

Also Geo I'm helping my cousin do a head gasket on a 2002 SE-R Spec V Sentra on the Jan 9th and 10th. What year was yours?
__________________

ZHP Mods: JB Lightweight fly wheel (10.5 pounds), Koni FSD ProKit, Supreme Power Drop Hats, Hotchkis front(30.2mm)/rear(25.4mm) sway bars, Sprint Booster, AFE Stage 1 Intake, Morimoto EvoX-R Headlights, Orion V4 Angel Eyes, Satin Black 18x9 ET42 APEX ARC-8 Wheel

330xi Mods:Front Koni Yellow Struts and Rob43 Rear 9 Way adjustable Rear Dampers,Custom Sport Springs,Supreme Power Drop Hats,ZHP 5 speed shift knob

Last edited by zander271; 12-30-2015 at 01:35 PM.
zander271 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2015, 02:51 PM   #14
Geo31
Ironman
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: The Woodlands, TX, USA
Posts: 2,769
My Ride: 98 M-Z3, 01 325iT
The Hotchkis may be as stiff as the ECS kit. It's hard to say without data. My point was that being hollow, they are not as stiff as they would be if they were not. IOW, I wouldn't want someone thinking they are getting stiffer bars because they are a larger diameter. They are likely about the same rate +/-.

I had a 1991 SE-R. It was the first year and I planned to keep it until I died. Unfortunately the first 4 years I had it was up north and the 3 winters on it took a SERious toll. I watched rust fall off it, all by itself, once while working on my 944. It was at that point that I realized it was not worth restoring. I'd have to replace too many panels. So, it became a donor for our LeMons car (another 91 SE-R).

The Spec V is a nice car. A good friend of mine was an engineer for Nissan at the time and he had a LARGE role in developing that car. I have several friends that still have one.
__________________
George Roffe

Swim: 2.4 Miles
Bike: 112 Miles
Run: 26.2 Miles
Brag: For the rest of your life


Geo31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2015, 03:06 PM   #15
Rob43
Performance Suspension Guru
 
Rob43's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Richmond VA
Posts: 7,869
My Ride: 03 331Ci 5spd R1200R
George,

very nice write up.

A word on SB stiffness:

I personally have no imperial data to back this up, but I've had many discussions with "big budget" Auto-X guys & what I've been repeatedly told is that the Hotchkis 30mm hollow SB set to full stiff is stiffer than a H&R 27mm solid SB set to full stiff. Both of the guys I'm thinking of tested everything with their big budgets in an attempt to find more speed, so I have no doubt that their info was correct on this matter.

Again, everything has its Pros & Cons, in this case price is a big factor.



Rob43
__________________



Rob #43 ITS/ITR/STU, BMW 325I, STU LAP RECORD
SUMMIT POINT WV 1:24:229 SCCA
(DynoDynamics https:vimeo.com/8486878 Dyno Video)
"Chance Favors The Prepared Mind"

I BUILD SUSPENSIONS (Consult) FROM MILD TO WILD FOR RWD & Xi E46's
Quote:
Originally Posted by RacerX View Post
Nitrous is a little trickier than boost, but it's not the spray that kills motors, it's STUPIDITY!!
I Know How To Fix The Rear "Bouncing" Problem On Your Cheap Coilovers Like: Jom RL FK SE & RK.

Last edited by Rob43; 12-30-2015 at 07:54 PM.
Rob43 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2015, 08:02 PM   #16
jacob220
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: queens
Posts: 136
My Ride: 2003 325i 5spd
Review: ECS Tuning Swaybar Kit

What sway bar links would you recommend George for a car with those sway bars (Ecs ones) and a stock sport suspension? MeyleHD?
__________________

Last edited by jacob220; 12-31-2015 at 10:50 PM.
jacob220 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Censor is ON





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:10 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
(c) 1999 - 2016 performanceIX Inc - privacy policy - terms of use