E46 BMW Social Directory E46 FAQ 3-Series Discussion Forums BMW Photo Gallery BMW 3-Series Technical Information E46 Fanatics - The Ultimate BMW Resource BMW Vendors General E46 Forum The Tire Rack's Tire Wheel Forum Forced Induction Forum The Off-Topic The E46 BMW Showroom For Sale, For Trade or Wanting to Buy

Welcome to the E46Fanatics forums. E46Fanatics is the premiere website for BMW 3 series owners around the world with interactive forums, a geographical enthusiast directory, photo galleries, and technical information for BMW enthusiasts.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

Go Back   E46Fanatics > Everything Else > The Off-Topic > Money Matters

Money Matters
Financial, Stock, Investment etc. posts here.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 02-02-2011, 11:08 AM   #1
darkapollo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: New Cumberland, PA
Posts: 140
My Ride: 2000 328i ZSP
Beginning investing, who what where...

Let me start off with this, Im not looking for a get-rich-over-night answer. I dont have that kind of money to MAKE that kind of money. Im also not looking for 'buy this stock now, and sell it in 35 seconds' or 'invest in this stock..' I am looking for ideas on what type of stocks, and some explanation of terms, and some simple beginners strategies that will help my wife, myself, and our soon-to-be-born son enjoy a looser belt.

Here is the problem though.
What I do have, is about $100 left over every pay line that is 'unallocated funds' money typically spent on car parts or frivolously wasted. No I am not living pay check to pay check, the majority of it goes to paying bills, student loans, car loans, mortgage, etc, and the rest goes into savings. My wife and I have a sustainable savings account to cover short term crisis (lack of would define pay-to-pay living to me). I know that is not much, and I cannot buy 5,000,000 shares of XYZ and hold it for a huge pay out.
But I ALSO know, that if I buy only 50 shares at $2 and sell them at $2.50 I have made money that I can re-invest (a whopping $25, but that is more then I started with)
I had been messing around on fool.com quite a few years ago, but never actually put money into it (they have a stock 'simulator' that allows you to play the real market with monopoly money). I actually enjoyed it, but never had the real funds to try my hand. I was, at the time, a poor college student after all.

I honestly have no reserve on taking that ~$200 every month and investing in stocks. If I make money, great, if I lose money, it would have been money wasted anyway. I AM WILLING to take the risks because the rewards are worth it. I know I wont make hand-over-fist money, but money making money, even a little bit, sets me in a better position then I am right now.

I have read a lot in this forum, beginners guides, whats hot, whats not. I am going to guess that a lot of you in here do on line trading? If so, which firm would you recommend? The best info, projections, etc. Do any of them have 'minimum' investment requirements?
I was thinking of joining up at E-Trade or scott-trade. yes? no?
darkapollo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 11:29 AM   #2
BmwMan325
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: St.Louis
Posts: 759
My Ride: 2011 Infiniti G37s
Welcome to the money section After reading your post, you seem to have a realistic view on things, that's always a good start. Like you mentioned, the relatively small amount of money you have, it is hard to create a diversified stock portfolio and also transaction costs will also be high. Information I would want to know about you is as follows.

1. Do you have retirement plans at your work (401K, pension, etc?) if so, how much do you contribute and do you get matched?
2. How old are you?
3. How much risk are you willing to take? (aka, would you be okay if all this money disappears? You somewhat talked about this in your post)
4. Do you have any kind of mutual funds, bond funds, etc?
5. What is the over all goal for this money? (retirement? extra money? child's college?)
__________________
BmwMan325 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 11:50 AM   #3
Wraisil
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Acworth, GA
Posts: 216
My Ride: 2010 Infiniti G37
Before I can give any answers, I'll add to BmwMan's questions.

6. Do you have an IRA that you contribute to?
7. Is all of your high interest debt paid off (any debt charging over 8% interest can be considered high interest for these purposes)?
8. How much time and attention can you afford to spend, and are willing to spend doing research and monitoring the market and your position?
9. Would your savings last for at least 6 months if you lost your income?
10. Do you want to invest this money, or trade stocks?

Last edited by Wraisil; 02-02-2011 at 11:52 AM.
Wraisil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 12:12 PM   #4
BmwMan325
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: St.Louis
Posts: 759
My Ride: 2011 Infiniti G37s
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wraisil View Post
Before I can give any answers, I'll add to BmwMan's questions.

6. Do you have an IRA that you contribute to?
7. Is all of your high interest debt paid off (any debt charging over 8% interest can be considered high interest for these purposes)?
8. How much time and attention can you afford to spend, and are willing to spend doing research and monitoring the market and your position?
9. Would your savings last for at least 6 months if you lost your income?
10. Do you want to invest this money, or trade stocks?
Great addition Wraisil.

All these questions are very important to answer before making the right decision.
__________________
BmwMan325 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 12:25 PM   #5
darkapollo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: New Cumberland, PA
Posts: 140
My Ride: 2000 328i ZSP

1 Yes, we do have a 401k, however, I am not planning on being with this company for the 5 years it will take to be fully vested. I am currently in the 'unskilled labor' field (my college major was software engineering, but it has been 8+ years since I worked with computers that I'm so far removed from the IT field.)
I am returning to college this summer for architectural engineering.

2 I am 28. Far to old to be doing this kind of work, but losing my 45k job during the economic bust two years ago, an expensive wedding shortly after, and failed business venture, depleted the money we had saved away.

3 As far as risk, the money I would be starting out with and using is 'disposable'. I'm not going to gamble away my mortgage payment on a penny stock in hopes of hitting it big. I would be investing the money that would other wise line the pockets of Applebees or Olive Garden. Sacrifice a few dinners out for the chance to invest in the future.

4 The only other investment is my home. I had sever thousand in CDs that I cashed in for the down payment. I do not own any other bonds or investments of any kind.

5 My goal currently is to get my feet wet until I am comfortable with buying more. Long term, retirement, college, debt free living would be the likely end game.
I know diversity is the key, and I am willing to branch out when I get the funds to do so. Even if I could do $100 split 5 ways, I think I would be better off then having my eggs in one basket.

I understand trading costs will be on the 'expensive' side compared to the investment but not prohibiting.
darkapollo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 12:30 PM   #6
BimmerFerret
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Cardinal Country, KY
Posts: 1,882
My Ride: 08 G37S, 07 Sky RL
Send a message via Skype™ to BimmerFerret
Subbed
__________________
2008 Infiniti G37S - Big Brakes, Limited Slip, etc.
2007 Sky Redline
1998 Honda Civic EX Sedan


Quote:
Originally Posted by Roxlo View Post
Class of '03, yet you're still an idiot. Whats your point? Do you really think that you're somehow a god because you joined a site before someone else? ****ing nerd.
BimmerFerret is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 12:43 PM   #7
BmwMan325
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: St.Louis
Posts: 759
My Ride: 2011 Infiniti G37s
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkapollo View Post

1 Yes, we do have a 401k, however, I am not planning on being with this company for the 5 years it will take to be fully vested. I am currently in the 'unskilled labor' field (my college major was software engineering, but it has been 8+ years since I worked with computers that I'm so far removed from the IT field.)
I am returning to college this summer for architectural engineering.

2 I am 28. Far to old to be doing this kind of work, but losing my 45k job during the economic bust two years ago, an expensive wedding shortly after, and failed business venture, depleted the money we had saved away.

3 As far as risk, the money I would be starting out with and using is 'disposable'. I'm not going to gamble away my mortgage payment on a penny stock in hopes of hitting it big. I would be investing the money that would other wise line the pockets of Applebees or Olive Garden. Sacrifice a few dinners out for the chance to invest in the future.

4 The only other investment is my home. I had sever thousand in CDs that I cashed in for the down payment. I do not own any other bonds or investments of any kind.

5 My goal currently is to get my feet wet until I am comfortable with buying more. Long term, retirement, college, debt free living would be the likely end game.
I know diversity is the key, and I am willing to branch out when I get the funds to do so. Even if I could do $100 split 5 ways, I think I would be better off then having my eggs in one basket.

I understand trading costs will be on the 'expensive' side compared to the investment but not prohibiting.
First, do you know the vesting schedule with your current jobs retirement plan? Most common is even within your first year of employment at that entity, your entitled to 20% of the match, you are always 100% vested in your own money, and when you leave this place, you can roll the money into an IRA. DON"T GIVE UP FREE MONEY! If your employer is matching, you should take advantage of it.

If you don't mind disclosing, how much money do you have in emergency savings? and besides your mortgage, do you have any CC debt? Student loan debt etc?
__________________
BmwMan325 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 01:15 PM   #8
darkapollo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: New Cumberland, PA
Posts: 140
My Ride: 2000 328i ZSP
6. Do you have an IRA that you contribute to?
I have a 401k where I currently work, but as I just became a 'non-probationary' employee on the 25th of last month, it JUST started. I am not planning on being with this company for more then a year and it would take 5 years to be fully vested. My current salary from this employer is <24k. Which is another reason for the returned interest in making money with the money I make.

7. Is all of your high interest debt paid off (any debt charging over 8% interest can be considered high interest for these purposes)?
I have one credit card with a balance and interest rate of 19% (ouch..) However, that card is a 'use and pay down' that keeps a rolling balance sub$500 on it. Interest on my auto loan is %5.75, my mortgage is %5.5 (my credit was in the toilet, has since been repaired)

8. How much time and attention can you afford to spend, and are willing to spend doing research and monitoring the market and your position?
I work 7a-3p 6 days a week. However I have my phone with me 24/7 and am always surfing the web at work (more like using bimmerapp.. ) I can honestly say that I can devote a fair amount of time to research, though I cant be on it 8hr a day.

9. Would your savings last for at least 6 months if you lost your income?
Yes. My wife and I set a goal to bump our savings back to short term crisis levels (aprox 6 months of sustained income) after losing my job two years ago. I am not going to use my living income, just the bit extra that would normally be 'fun' money. I would start small. Again, I am not looking to be an over night millionaire.

10. Do you want to invest this money, or trade stocks?
Most likely have simple short-term investments to help with home improvements or upgrading to a larger house, and eventually move to long term to help with college costs, retirement, etc. I would like to do stock trading as well, as that is the more 'tangible' money. The money right now, the fun money, would be going to stocks, as that is the disposable extra that its loss wouldnt be noticed. If I could show my wife the benefit of investments (she has a 401k at work that she does not contribute to, currently it is worth little more then $2500) then I might be able to convince her that long term investing is worth it.

I have had 5 year CD's in the past, and it was always nice to see the interest they would collect, though not much. I knew it was money that was making money for itself. When I cashed them out, I had enough to double the down payment on our home. When I had the crazy idea to start buying them, I never thought of what they could do for me, it was just money that I would have again 'someday'. Collecting all of the papers and cashing them out, then going to our home closing and doubling our down payment was a very good day. I just want to get into something with a bit higher of a return.

Quote:
If you don't mind disclosing, how much money do you have in emergency savings? and besides your mortgage, do you have any CC debt? Student loan debt etc?
We currently have just over 8k in our savings. Which would be enough to support us on a single income for just over 6 months.
My credit card debt is very very minimal. I keep balance less then $500. I keep a rolling balance on it (paying more then the minimum). I was advised to do this (by our mortgage broker) to help repair the credit that my ex and I destroyed with our nasty separation (i had the credit, she had the money, we split, guess who had the credit and no money...)

Last edited by darkapollo; 02-02-2011 at 01:23 PM.
darkapollo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 01:25 PM   #9
BmwMan325
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: St.Louis
Posts: 759
My Ride: 2011 Infiniti G37s
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkapollo View Post
6. Do you have an IRA that you contribute to?
I have a 401k where I currently work, but as I just became a 'non-probationary' employee on the 25th of last month, it JUST started. I am not planning on being with this company for more then a year and it would take 5 years to be fully vested. My current salary from this employer is <24k. Which is another reason for the returned interest in making money with the money I make.

7. Is all of your high interest debt paid off (any debt charging over 8% interest can be considered high interest for these purposes)?
I have one credit card with a balance and interest rate of 19% (ouch..) However, that card is a 'use and pay down' that keeps a rolling balance sub$500 on it. Interest on my auto loan is %5.75, my mortgage is %5.5 (my credit was in the toilet, has since been repaired)

8. How much time and attention can you afford to spend, and are willing to spend doing research and monitoring the market and your position?
I work 7a-3p 6 days a week. However I have my phone with me 24/7 and am always surfing the web at work (more like using bimmerapp.. ) I can honestly say that I can devote a fair amount of time to research, though I cant be on it 8hr a day.

9. Would your savings last for at least 6 months if you lost your income?
Yes. My wife and I set a goal to bump our savings back to short term crisis levels (aprox 6 months of sustained income) after losing my job two years ago. I am not going to use my living income, just the bit extra that would normally be 'fun' money. I would start small. Again, I am not looking to be an over night millionaire.

10. Do you want to invest this money, or trade stocks?
Most likely have simple short-term investments to help with home improvements or upgrading to a larger house, and eventually move to long term to help with college costs, retirement, etc. I would like to do stock trading as well, as that is the more 'tangible' money. The money right now, the fun money, would be going to stocks, as that is the disposable extra that its loss wouldnt be noticed. If I could show my wife the benefit of investments (she has a 401k at work that she does not contribute to, currently it is worth little more then $2500) then I might be able to convince her that long term investing is worth it.


I have had 5 year CD's in the past, and it was always nice to see the interest they would collect, though not much. I knew it was money that was making money for itself. When I cashed them out, I had enough to double the down payment on our home. When I had the crazy idea to start buying them, I never thought of what they could do for me, it was just money that I would have again 'someday'. Collecting all of the papers and cashing them out, then going to our home closing and doubling our down payment was a very good day. I just want to get into something with a bit higher of a return.
I think this is something that needs to be worked on. Typically when you talk about short-term investments, that is typically talking about CD's, short term bonds etc. You could include holding a stock short term, but excluding stocks, you will receive lower returns from short term investments. Theres not going to be a lot of profit to help with home improvements. Also, like mentioned before, buying individual stocks with only adding a couple hundred a month is not going to be reasonable... Your best bet if you want to follow the general direction of the market is to purchase a S&P 500 ETF. That gives you all stock exposure, but with the small amount of capital you have, it would be hard to construct a bond and stock portfolio. This is just the beginning of the over all discussion too.




Also, Once you get the job you want/searching for, I think you need to take advantage of a tax deffered retirement plan (aka 401K). When you purchase a mutual fund out side of a retirement plan, you are incharge of paying taxes on gains and dividends in that taxable year. When you have gains in a 401k, you don't pay any taxes until you withdraw the money at retirement. The downside of a 401k plan is that the money is not easy to obtain without paying a penalty. There are a few hardship withdraw rules.

being at the age of 28 with no retirement funds at all and your wife only have 2500 in her 401k thats what I would focus on.
__________________

Last edited by BmwMan325; 02-02-2011 at 01:39 PM.
BmwMan325 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 01:34 PM   #10
mvrk10256
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Austin, Tx
Posts: 3,904
My Ride: E30 325i
Send a message via AIM to mvrk10256
this thread is relevant to my interests. subbed.
__________________
mvrk10256 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 02:41 PM   #11
Wraisil
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Acworth, GA
Posts: 216
My Ride: 2010 Infiniti G37
Now that we have some more information I'll start with my personal recommendations.

First, good job on not racking up a ton of debt and having the foresight to save and start making more. First thing I would recommend is to pay off the credit card balance completely. It sounds nice when you say it only has $500 on it but a $500 balance carried on average with that interest rate will charge you almost $500 in interest each year. Pay it off each month so you can put away that extra $500/year.

My personal belief in where money should go in order of priority for a solid financial foundation is as follows:

1. Pay necessary bills. This includes food/gas/utilities/roof over your head/ clothes/insurance including life insurance etc.

2. Savings for emergencies. You seem to have this one covered but keep in mind that as you earn more in the future you will need to expand the savings to keep up with any increases in lifestyle. I like 6 months take home pay as a minimum guideline.

3. Savings for retirement. These are long term holdings of varying risk levels that are in a retirement vessel such as a 401(k) (preferred method if there is a company match that you can get some or fully vested in), Roth IRA or standard IRA (Roth is preferred for most younger people). This is number three because all of the following are desires/wants but a failure to save for retirement will result in working until you die or being forced to live a life of poverty in old age (unless you have family that can take care of your finances for years and years).

4. Savings for short term and long term purchases. This includes buying a new T.V. or car all the way up to buying a home. Other things to save for might work best in their own account, such as a 503B or 529 account for college for people's kids. (these are purchases and expenses that you would like to make in the future but are not necessary)

5. Discretionary spending. This includes vacations (if not saved for under #4), going out for entertainment, and other expenses that are relatively small but add up quickly.

6. Any remaining funds. This is the money you can either add to savings for purchases or retirement. This is the money that would fall into your category of "play money" to buy stocks with.

Last edited by Wraisil; 02-02-2011 at 03:24 PM.
Wraisil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 03:24 PM   #12
Wraisil
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Acworth, GA
Posts: 216
My Ride: 2010 Infiniti G37
Next up, definitions! WeeEEEE~

Investing - Investing involves taking your money and giving it to others in return for anticipated growth of that money. Generally, who to give the money to is determined by research of financial fundamentals and other tangible information that leads the investor to conclude that this is the place to put their money (or at least some of it). Growth is neither guaranteed nor insured against a loss. Investing involves long time-frames with at least one year invested the minimum to move from a short term capital gain to a long term capital gain (more on capital gains later).

Trading - Trading involves taking calculated risks based off technical indicators (and for some, fundamentals as well) to attempt to return a profit in either seconds, minutes, days, or sometimes weeks. Traders take either large volumes of small moves in price to make money and/or large moves in their positions to generate their profit.

The vast majority of investors who follow the basic advice (such as diversify etc) make a profit that more than outpaces inflation in the long term scenario.

The vast majority of new traders lose everything and run away from the markets. The small percentage who take the time to learn how to trade, develop a strategy and test it prior to committing any money are generally successful. The traders who get lucky and make money early so they have time to develop a strategy that works for them prior to running out of funds also will generally succeed.

I mention the last two things to emphasize that using "trading" to try and convince your wife to "invest" is not an apples to apples comparison. While proper investing does take some research and studying, trading is more like a job with the amount of time it takes to do properly and is more difficult to make money with. The upside of trading is that if you do it well you can make much better returns than most investors will see.

I'll get into trading stocks advantages and disadvantages for the trader with a small amount of money to work with in my next post.

Last edited by Wraisil; 02-02-2011 at 05:46 PM.
Wraisil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 04:00 PM   #13
Wraisil
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Acworth, GA
Posts: 216
My Ride: 2010 Infiniti G37
Advantages of trading for those with small amounts of money to devote to it:
1. You "can" make better returns than most savings accounts CD's and other "safe" short term means of earning money.

2. Many brokerages have a decent amount of "no-load" funds that can save you money in fees.

3. Losses, even when they are a total loss, will generally have minimal impact on you psychologically with regards to investing and the markets in the future.

Disadvantages:
1. Even large % returns only give a small dollar amount in returns.

2. A large number of "no-load" funds require that you hold them for a minimum time period which may not fit your desired trading time period.

3. Fees can quickly eat into your profits. For instance, with Scottrade's $7 per trade you will pay $14 round trip (buy and sell or sell short and cover) regardless on number of shares bought and sold. This means if you buy $100 worth of stock then you must see a 14% return before you break even on the trade. However, if you buy $10,000 worth of stock then a 0.14% return is break even and the other 13.86% increase in price is now profit.

Another consideration is taxes. Short term capital gains tax (any buy and sell of a stock held for less than one year) is currently at 35% compared to 15% for long term gains. This means that if you trade short term and make $100 profit you only get to keep $65 of it compared to $85 if you made the same on a one year or longer hold. This means you have to make almost a 31% higher return than an "investor" using the same capital in order to have the same take-home profit for the year.

Last edited by Wraisil; 02-02-2011 at 04:02 PM.
Wraisil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 04:17 PM   #14
Wraisil
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Acworth, GA
Posts: 216
My Ride: 2010 Infiniti G37
A couple other things, while the mortgage broker recommended you maintain a balance, you don't have to pay interest to do so. You can have a balance and never pay interest on a credit card. IF you pay if off in full on say Friday and go charge something that day then you will still have a balance but the charges are for a new billing period and will not accrue interest until later.

Some of the posts I made above may come across as anti-trading and I realize that. I am not against trading or encouraging people to trade. I trade every chance I get if I have the time and see a setup I've researched coming into play. I have known family friends and many others, as well as reading the stories of failed traders, that did not put as much research, learning, practice and use of discipline lose significant sums of money. A family friend (lives across the street from my parents) once came over while I was visiting, I had my stock charts up on their computer as I often do when I'm out there and she couldn't even look at them and didn't want to talk about them at all. I later found out that she lost 25k or so in 6 months trying to trade (pretty much her entire balance at the time).

Trading isn't easy to be successful at. I will say that, for me, it is very enjoyable 95% of the time and if I won the lottery it would be my full time job in my new-found retirement though . When things work out for a trader it can be a very good month (January was my best month to date at +20% approximately for me for instance) but you have to be willing to suck up the losses (it was 25% until last Friday) and accept losses when they happen. Emotional trading can quickly destroy a traders portfolio so you can't take losses emotionally and you can't get "high" on the gains.

Now that I've written a book of suggestions etc, I'll shut up and let someone else contribute

Last edited by Wraisil; 02-02-2011 at 04:19 PM.
Wraisil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 08:12 PM   #15
darkapollo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: New Cumberland, PA
Posts: 140
My Ride: 2000 328i ZSP

Great information!
Absolutely fantastic information.

I was actually nervous that this would be a 'bash the dumb 2k10 noob' thread, but you guys are fantastic. So much good information.

You covered things that I never even thought of. Taxes, trade fees, return percentage etc.

So I am probably more interested in stock trading, and I can see and understand how time consuming it can be.
What type of market research do you do? I am no stranger to research. I was an inventory control specialist before my lay-off, and that required hours and hours a day looking at numbers, patterns, and other dull computer related tasks. Before that, I was a property disposal specialist, again, more research, A LOT of research. I very much enjoy it.

If I was going to get into stocks, would you suggest I stay at fool.com and work out a game plan? How do I develop one?

Before I start, I will get all of my ducks in a row (pay off credit card, etc), and stash some more away for a higher initial capital investment. It probably wont be tens of thousands of dollars, but I will take the hundred or so every pay check and bundle it to at least a thousand.
darkapollo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 08:14 PM   #16
BmwMan325
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: St.Louis
Posts: 759
My Ride: 2011 Infiniti G37s
I would recommend finding a good intro book about stocks. You need to learn the basics. example, large cap vs small cap, Income statements, Balance Sheets, Cash flow statements P/E ratios, trading execution (Limit order, market order) etc...
__________________
BmwMan325 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 09:27 PM   #17
darkapollo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: New Cumberland, PA
Posts: 140
My Ride: 2000 328i ZSP
I will do that!
Thank you guys so much for sharing your vast wealth of knowledge.
darkapollo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2011, 08:00 AM   #18
Wraisil
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Acworth, GA
Posts: 216
My Ride: 2010 Infiniti G37
For free information you can get a lot of the basic knowledge here http://www.investopedia.com/universi...dingblocks.asp and some more in depth information on that site as well. Trading strategies aren't covered very well there but it's got a good foundation of information to learn.
Wraisil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2011, 08:21 AM   #19
Old Rum
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Tierra Verde, FL
Posts: 184
My Ride: 04mtXI 02mtX5 13F30
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkapollo View Post
:I am returning to college this summer for architectural engineering.

.
This is the only problem that I see with your plan. Now, I don't want to sound harsh but the AEC industry is flooded with talent and the job market is the worst it has ever been. Are you currently at an AEC firm? I am a landscape architect and I see civils, HVAC, Mech Enginneers, architects and planner laid off like there is no tomorrow. Granted it is a rewarding field, the jobs just do not exist. It was kind of said to see my friend who graduated top of his class with two masters degrees still an intern after taking the ARE. He is a licensed architect redlining construction documents getting $25 an hour with five years experience. Unless you have an in at some firm, I would strongly suggest a different career path.
Old Rum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2011, 09:50 AM   #20
darkapollo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: New Cumberland, PA
Posts: 140
My Ride: 2000 328i ZSP
Nothing else has interested me. I would honesty take $25/ hr. That is more then double my current wage. After my lay off the only thing I could find was a crummy unskilled labor warehouse job, which is where I am now.
darkapollo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Censor is ON





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
(c) 1999 - 2011 performanceIX Inc - privacy policy - terms of use