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Old 11-15-2011, 09:44 AM   #641
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Possible proof for a 23 year old unifying quantum field theory...
http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...ifying-quantum

What's interesting is this bit
Quote:
His conjecture is called the a-theorem. It says that the number of ways in which quantum fields can be energetically excited (a) is always greater at high energies than at low energies.
I wonder what sort of relation there is between energy and excitable states. What is the upper limit and how is it determined? Not knowing anything about the relation it's easy to assume that given enough energy the number of states would shoot off to infinity, but considering we're talking the quantum world I'm assuming the states are explicit energy levels that exist in steps (aka they're quantized).
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Old 11-15-2011, 06:07 PM   #642
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Studies: Stem Cells Reverse Heart Damage

http://www.cnn.com/2011/11/14/health...amage-reverse/

Significant improvements in heart performance after major heart damage. 40% of scar tissue reversed. New tissue grown as heart repairs itself.

Quote:
Conventional wisdom took a hit Monday, as Bolli's group and a team from Cedars-Sinai each reported that stem cell therapies were able to reverse heart damage, without dangerous side effects, at least in a small group of patients.

In Bolli's study, published in The Lancet, 16 patients with severe heart failure received a purified batch of cardiac stem cells. Within a year, their heart function markedly improved. The heart's pumping ability can be quantified through the "Left Ventricle Ejection Fraction," a measure of how much blood the heart pumps with each contraction. A patient with an LVEF of less than 40% is considered to suffer severe heart failure. When the study began, Bolli's patients had an average LVEF of 30.3%. Four months after receiving stem cells, it was 38.5%. Among seven patients who were followed for a full year, it improved to an astounding 42.5%. A control group of seven patients, given nothing but standard maintenance medications, showed no improvement at all.

-snip-

The results were striking. Not only did scar tissue retreat -- shrinking 40% in Ken Milles, and between 30% and 47% in other test subjects -- but the patients actually generated new heart tissue. On average, the stem cell recipients grew the equivalent of 600 million new heart cells, according to Marban, who used MRI imaging to measure changes. By way of perspective, a major heart attack might kill off a billion cells.

"This is unprecedented, the first time anyone has grown living heart muscle," says Marban. "No one else has demonstrated that. It's very gratifying, especially when the conventional teaching has been that the damage is irreversible."

Perhaps even more important, no treated patient in either study suffered a significant health setback.

The twin findings are a boost to the notion that the heart contains the seeds of its own rebirth. For years, doctors believed that heart cells, once destroyed, were gone forever. But in a series of experiments, researchers including Bolli's collaborator, Dr. Piero Anversa, found that the heart contains a type of stem cell that can develop into either heart muscle or blood vessel components -- in essence, whatever the heart requires at a particular point in time. The problem for patients like Mike Jones or Ken Milles is that there simply aren't enough of these repair cells waiting around. The experimental treatments involve removing stem cells through a biopsy, and making millions of copies in a laboratory.

-snip-

Bolli says he'll have to temper his enthusiasm until he can duplicate the results in larger studies, definitive enough to get stem cell therapy approved as a standard treatment. "If a phase 3 study confirmed this, it would be the biggest advance in cardiology in my lifetime. We would possibly be curing heart failure. It would be a revolution."

Full Article @ LINK
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Old 11-15-2011, 06:10 PM   #643
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In all seriousness though, I firmly believe that my generation will have the chance (the lucky ones with enough $$$) to live well into their 100s and I'll see the end of most, if not all, major diseases. Modern medicine never ceases to amaze me and the speed with which we learn and apply things only increases as time goes on. The next 20 years should be very interesting.
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Old 11-15-2011, 06:32 PM   #644
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Studies: Stem Cells Reverse Heart Damage

Significant improvements in heart performance after major heart damage. 40% of scar tissue reversed. New tissue grown as heart repairs itself.


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Originally Posted by cowmoo32 View Post

In all seriousness though, I firmly believe that my generation will have the chance (the lucky ones with enough $$$) to live well into their 100s and I'll see the end of most, if not all, major diseases. Modern medicine never ceases to amaze me and the speed with which we learn and apply things only increases as time goes on. The next 20 years should be very interesting.
I agree. Have a problem....inject stem cells, or get a vaccine. And healthy living standards will be common knowledge. Sadly, we will still fat people that sit on the couch.

I wonder if drug use, alcohol and cigarette use will diminish after everything we know about them.
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Old 11-15-2011, 06:49 PM   #645
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I agree. Have a problem....inject stem cells, or get a vaccine. And healthy living standards will be common knowledge. Sadly, we will still fat people that sit on the couch.

I wonder if drug use, alcohol and cigarette use will diminish after everything we know about them.
Hasn't cigarette smoking been on the rise with the latest generation?
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Old 11-15-2011, 07:57 PM   #646
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Hasn't cigarette smoking been on the rise with the latest generation?
I think it has risen slightly, but it does not matter how high tech your medical abilities are if you still abuse your body at the most basic levels.

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Old 11-15-2011, 08:02 PM   #647
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Hasn't cigarette smoking been on the rise with the latest generation?
Only in the hipster population. Europe and Asia on the other hand are tobacco central.
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Old 11-16-2011, 02:19 PM   #648
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Not entirely breaking news, but it looks like this technology is pretty realistic and cost effective.

http://nextbigfuture.com/2011/07/nan...ng-as.html?m=1
Quote:
Nanocrystalline cellulose as strong as Kevlar and extracted from plants is heading to commercialization in Canada
A new Edmonton-based pilot facility will be the first in Canada to produce the quality of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) that researchers need to fully explore all its potential applications.

The $5.5-million pilot plant, created through a collaboration of the provincial and federal governments in partnership with industry under the Western Economic Partnership Agreement (WEPA), will use wood and straw pulp, like that from flax and hemp, to create up to 100 kg per week of NCC for testing in commercial applications leading to production.

Nanocrystalline cellulose can be as strong or stronger than Kevlar (Cellulose 70 to 137 GPa and Kevlar 100 GPa - tensile strength)



One ounce of NCC added to one pound of plastic can make a composite material up to 3000-times stronger than the original plastic alone.

Adding NCC to materials increases their strength and stiffness. Just a small amount can increase resistance to stress threefold, making it attractive as a high-performance reinforcing material.

NCC can also alter the surface of material such as paper, changing its permeability, strength, flexibility and optical properties.

A little NCC boosts paper's gloss and changes its strength, stiffness, surface smoothness and bulk, paving the way for new types with novel applications and for paints, varnishes and advanced high-strength materials.

Optical films enhanced with NCC are suited for use in specialty packaging, biosensors and security devices and could even help prevent counterfeiting.

In addition, because NCC is affected by magnetic and electrical fields, it could prove useful as a filler in magnetic paper, electronic memory cards and readers, and other electronic products.

That kind of strength for those prices? Yes please. I could see something like this completely changing the housing industry.

And this kid made the stuff with his professor out of waste pulp.
http://www.azonano.com/news.aspx?newsID=23127
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Old 11-16-2011, 03:17 PM   #649
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One ounce of NCC added to one pound of plastic can make a composite material up to 3000-times stronger than the original plastic alone.
Damn, especially at $10/kg
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Old 11-16-2011, 04:14 PM   #650
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Damn, especially at $10/kg
So 1kg of that for $10 would yield 17kg of super strong plastic. And it's totally degradable.

Also in other news,

http://www.gizmag.com/burton-true-3d...display/20499/





Quote:
Engineers from Burton Inc. in Japan have rolled out a "True 3D" display, which evolved from work begun five years previously by teams at Keio University and Japan's national institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). While most 3D displays available today involve a form of optical illusion that depends on the parallax or disparity inherent in human binocular vision, this new system, which can function in air or under water, needs no screen of any sort, and the effect is quite impressive.

View all
"Most current 3D devices project pictures onto a 2D screen, and make the pictures appear 3D through an optical illusion. But this device actually shows images in mid-air, so a feature of this system is that it enables 3D objects to be viewed naturally." said Burton engineer Hayato Watanabe.

The Burton system functions by focusing laser light into points which stimulate oxygen and nitrogen molecules in the air to a plasma excitation level. Computer control of the laser's position can cause the dots to coalesce into recognizable patterns very similar to a hologram, but literally in thin air.

"This system can create about 50,000 dots per second, and its frame rate is currently about 10-15 fps. But we're working to improve the frame rate to 24-30 fps," Watanabe explained.

In the demonstration video following this article, a green laser shines up from below into a small tank of water, but to create displays in air, more powerful lasers are needed. By combining red, green and blue lasers, the Burton team has managed to generate color images, which opens up a vast array of possible uses as the technology improves.

"As the first application for this, we thought of digital signage. Also, because this system makes 3D objects look natural, it could be used for analyzing 3D objects, and if its precision can be improved, it could be used in health care, too," said Watanabe.

Indeed, it seems we could be witnessing the birth of the technology that might one day allow autonomous robots to beam important messages such as, say, "Help me Obi-Wan Kenobi, you're my only hope." We'll just have to wait and see.


And in more other news,
Batteries with 10x more capacity and 10x faster charge
http://www.kurzweilai.net/batteries-...rge-10x-faster

Quote:
Northwestern University engineers have created an electrode for lithium-ion batteries — rechargeable batteries such as those found in cellphones and iPods — that allows them to hold a charge up to 10 times greater and charge 10 times faster than current batteries; they could also pave the way for more efficient, smaller batteries for electric cars.

The technology could be seen in the marketplace in the next three to five years, the researchers said.

“We have found a way to extend a new lithium-ion battery’s charge life by 10 times,” said Harold H. Kung, professor of chemical and biological engineering.

“Even after 150 charges, which would be one year or more of operation, the battery is still five times more effective than lithium-ion batteries on the market today.”

How Lithium-ion batteries work

Lithium-ion batteries charge through a chemical reaction in which lithium ions are sent between two ends of the battery, the anode and the cathode. As energy in the battery is used, the lithium ions travel from the anode, through the electrolyte, and to the cathode; as the battery is recharged, they travel in the reverse direction.

With current technology, the performance of a lithium-ion battery is limited in two ways. Its energy capacity — how long a battery can maintain its charge — is limited by the charge density, or how many lithium ions can be packed into the anode or cathode. Meanwhile, a battery’s charge rate — the speed at which it recharges — is limited by another factor: the speed at which the lithium ions can make their way from the electrolyte into the anode.

In current rechargeable batteries, the anode — made of layer upon layer of carbon-based graphene sheets — can only accommodate one lithium atom for every six carbon atoms. To increase energy capacity, scientists have previously experimented with replacing the carbon with silicon, as silicon can accommodate much more lithium: four lithium atoms for every silicon atom. However, silicon expands and contracts dramatically in the charging process, causing fragmentation and losing its charge capacity rapidly.

Currently, the speed of a battery’s charge rate is hindered by the shape of the graphene sheets: they are extremely thin — just one carbon atom thick — but by comparison, very long. During the charging process, a lithium ion must travel all the way to the outer edges of the graphene sheet before entering and coming to rest between the sheets. And because it takes so long for lithium to travel to the middle of the graphene sheet, a sort of ionic traffic jam occurs around the edges of the material.

Battery charging breakthroughs

The research team has combined two techniques to combat both these problems. First, to stabilize the silicon in order to maintain maximum charge capacity, they sandwiched clusters of silicon between the graphene sheets. This allowed for a greater number of lithium atoms in the electrode while utilizing the flexibility of graphene sheets to accommodate the volume changes of silicon during use.

The team also used a chemical oxidation process to create miniscule holes (10 to 20 nanometers) in the graphene sheets — termed “in-plane defects” — so the lithium ions would have a “shortcut” into the anode and be stored there by reaction with silicon. This reduced the time it takes the battery to recharge by up to 10 times.

Next, the researchers will begin studying changes in the cathode that could further increase effectiveness of the batteries. They also will look into developing an electrolyte system that will allow the battery to automatically and reversibly shut off at high temperatures — a safety mechanism that could prove vital in electric car applications.
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Old 11-17-2011, 10:23 AM   #651
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Holy shite. 1 teraflop chip, just look at the size of the thing. I'm really happy there are people more intelligent than me that build these kinds of things.

Quote:
Rajeeb Hazra, Intel's general manger of technical computing, surprised a group attending this year's SC11 conference, at a steak house in Seattle this past week, by holding up a single chip and declaring "It's not a PowerPoint, it's a real chip." He was referring to the processing chip Intel has created that is capable of performing at 1 teraflops, called the Knights Corner, it is, unlike its rivals, based on the x86 architecture that still sits at the base of most desktop machines in use today.


The SC conference is a meeting for those in the high performance computing arena, thus it was no coincidence that Intel was fully prepared to unveil its chip, which it is clearly proud of.

The chip attains its high processing speeds by making use of multiple processors, or a Many Integrated Core - MIC architecture; in this case, more than 50, which pretty much puts to shame the quad-core technology being advertised for use in computers used by regular people. The new chip will first be installed in a machine at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, which expects the system to run at 10 petaflops.

The announcement of the chip has industry insiders marveling once again at the progress being made in systems architecture. It was just fourteen years ago that Intel showed off its first computer capable of running at 1 teraflop, a machine that required almost 10,000 Pentium chips and took up all of 72 cabinets. Putting all that power in one new chip reduces power consumption dramatically.

The new chip isn't meant to be used as a CPU though, instead it's to serve as a coprocessor, taking on specific, highly computational routines, helping to bump up the overall speed of a computer, much the same way graphics processors are used in desktop PC's.

And speaking of graphics processors, the announcement of the Knights Corner means Intel is taking direct aim at Nvidia and AMD, two companies that make graphics processors but who have also branched out into making their coprocessors a useful component in superfast computers. Thus, the stakes have just been raised.

Intel says its product is a better fit for most current systems due to its being based on x86 architecture, because adopters won't have to port their applications to a new technology, unlike its competitors.

Intel also took advantage of the spotlight it garnered with the announcement of its Knights Corner chip to declare the that company has set a goal of attaining exascale speeds by 2018, which would mean a 100 fold increase over current technology. Computers running at such speeds would open up doors to new results oriented computing such as better weather prediction, or figuring out what really happens when cars crash, and would of course be wanted by the military to calculate super secret stuff.
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Old 11-17-2011, 10:31 AM   #652
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Studies: Stem Cells Reverse Heart Damage

http://www.cnn.com/2011/11/14/health...amage-reverse/

Significant improvements in heart performance after major heart damage. 40% of scar tissue reversed. New tissue grown as heart repairs itself.
Pretty cool! Surprised it worked just through regular infusion (at least that's what it sounds like)
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Old 11-17-2011, 10:35 AM   #653
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But will it play Crysis?
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Old 11-17-2011, 10:39 AM   #654
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This page is ftw.
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Old 11-17-2011, 11:00 AM   #655
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Maybe you guys share this with me. Either I'm a pseudo-intelligent or I've surrendered in the face of infinite information. Everyday I feel like I know less and less and thus I feel less capable of giving input on really any topic.
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Old 11-17-2011, 11:13 AM   #656
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Maybe you guys share this with me. Either I'm a pseudo-intelligent or I've surrendered in the face of infinite information. Everyday I feel like I know less and less and thus I feel less capable of giving input on really any topic.
I feel the exact opposite. I feel like reading and keeping up with the changes has done nothing but increase my knowledge on a vast number of subjects.



This....this right here....is the t!ts. It's things like this that make me want to focus on quantum mechanics once I get back to school. There's a quote out there somewhere that says modern technology is indistinguishable from magic and IMO this is proof. They have literally created something from nothing.
http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-11-...ts-vacuum.html


Scientists create light from vacuum
Quote:
In the Chalmers scientists' experiments, virtual photons bounce off a "mirror" that vibrates at a speed that is almost as high as the speed of light. The round mirror in the picture is a symbol, and under that is the quantum electronic component (referred to as a SQUID), which acts as a mirror. This makes real photons appear (in pairs) in vacuum
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Old 11-17-2011, 11:25 AM   #657
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Just think of the miracle that is this (think Siri, if nothing else; forget battery size, memory capacity, heck, even forget its use as a phone)...



Compared with cutting-edge only a mere 25-30 years ago...



My father was born early in 1903, and before his death at 92 years of age, he had spanned the first motorized flight and Armstrong walking on the moon (whether he swears to it or not)... this after thousands of years of more-or-less static intellectual growth. Moore's law predicts a huge, exponential increase of knowledge and technology in just the next few decades. I'm only sorry I won't live long enough to see everything you youngsters will be experiencing... or... will I? Bring on the longevity pills!
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Old 11-17-2011, 11:26 AM   #658
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Just in the last few months scientists increased the lifespan of mice three fold. We're not far off. And even if that doesn't work out there's always the chance we'll be able to upload our consciousness and live forever on a solid state drive somewhere, and I'm totally cool with doing that.
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Old 11-17-2011, 11:29 AM   #659
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Just in the last few months scientists increased the lifespan of mice three fold. We're not far off. And even if that doesn't work out there's always the chance we'll be able to upload our consciousness and live forever on a solid state drive somewhere, and I'm totally cool with doing that.
**** yeah!

Life is full of misery, loneliness, and suffering - and it's all over much too soon. --Woody Allen
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Old 11-17-2011, 11:30 AM   #660
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Hell, we're already well on our way to manipulating our environment with thoughts alone. Now take that that idea, extrapolate out a couple hundred years, and the need for a physical body is a moot point. Who needs nutrients? We have electricity.
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