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Old 04-24-2012, 02:19 PM   #1161
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Ever play Dead Space ?
Nope.........Wife says I am though











Went and Googled....got it
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Old 04-24-2012, 02:38 PM   #1162
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Intel Increases Transistor Speed by Building Upward
By JOHN MARKOFF
Published: May 4, 2011

HILLSBORO, Ore. - Intel announced on Wednesday that it had again found a way to make computer chips that could process information more quickly and with less power in less space.






http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/05/science/05chip.html

I thought this was really interesting when i first heard about it. Intel has really been pushing processing power up in leaps and bounds the past several years, ever since the core2 duo.


hello 22nm. and only 1 year later
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Old 04-24-2012, 05:35 PM   #1163
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Nope.........Wife says I am though
that's too funny
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Old 04-25-2012, 09:08 AM   #1164
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Nothing to see here, just affecting events in the past, pulling data from particles that don't exist
http://phys.org/news/2012-04-quantum...ky-action.html
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Physicists of the group of Prof. Anton Zeilinger at the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI), the University of Vienna, and the Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology (VCQ) have, for the first time, demonstrated in an experiment that the decision whether two particles were in an entangled or in a separable quantum state can be made even after these particles have been measured and may no longer exist. Their results will be published this week in the journal Nature Physics.
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Old 04-25-2012, 12:44 PM   #1165
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Old 04-25-2012, 01:22 PM   #1166
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Oh wow CTRL+Scroll mouse backward.
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Old 04-26-2012, 07:55 AM   #1167
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http://www.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/g...lass-0426.html
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Old 04-27-2012, 07:29 AM   #1168
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Interesting.

http://htwins.net/scale2/
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Old 04-27-2012, 02:13 PM   #1169
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Watch the entire thing, pretty amazing
!
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Old 04-27-2012, 02:18 PM   #1170
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fun with electromagnetic fields?
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Old 04-27-2012, 03:51 PM   #1171
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Watch the entire thing, pretty amazing
!
I want the pencil sharpner he's using.

You could've made it easier on us and posted the English version.
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Old 04-30-2012, 12:32 PM   #1172
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Made using images from Cassini & Voyager
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Old 04-30-2012, 12:36 PM   #1173
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Physicists from the University of Zurich have discovered a previously unknown particle composed of three quarks in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator. A new baryon could thus be detected for the first time at the LHC. The baryon known as Xi_b^* confirms fundamental assumptions of physics regarding the binding of quarks.

In particle physics, the baryon family refers to particles that are made up of three quarks. Quarks form a group of six particles that differ in their masses and charges. The two lightest quarks, the so-called "up" and "down" quarks, form the two atomic components, protons and neutrons. All baryons that are composed of the three lightest quarks ("up," "down" and "strange" quarks) are known. Only very few baryons with heavy quarks have been observed to date. They can only be generated artificially in particle accelerators as they are heavy and very unstable.

In the course of proton collisions in the LHC at CERN, physicists Claude Amsler, Vincenzo Chiochia and Ernest Aguiló from the University of Zurich's Physics Institute managed to detect a baryon with one light and two heavy quarks. The particle Xi_b^* comprises one "up," one "strange" and one "bottom" quark (usb), is electrically neutral and has a spin of 3/2 (1.5). Its mass is comparable to that of a lithium atom. The new discovery means that two of the three baryons predicted in the usb composition by theory have now been observed.

The discovery was based on data gathered in the CMS detector, which the University of Zurich was involved in developing. The new particle cannot be detected directly as it is too unstable to be registered by the detector. However, Xi_b^* breaks up in a known cascade of decay products. Ernest Aguiló, a postdoctoral student from Professor Amsler's group, identified traces of the respective decay products in the measurement data and was able to reconstruct the decay cascades starting from Xi_b^* decays.

The calculations are based on data from proton-proton collisions at an energy of seven Tera electron volts (TeV) collected by the CMS detector between April and November 2011. A total of 21 Xi_b^* baryon decays were discovered -- statistically sufficient to rule out a statistical fluctuation.

The discovery of the new particle confirms the theory of how quarks bind and therefore helps to understand the strong interaction, one of the four basic forces of physics which determines the structure of matter.

The University of Zurich is involved in the LHC at CERN with three research groups. Professor Amsler's and Professor Chiochia's groups are working on the CMS experiment; Professor Straumann's group is involved in the LHCb experiment.

CMS detector

The CMS detector is designed to measure the energy and momentum of photons, electrons, muons and other charged particles with a high degree of accuracy. Various measuring instruments are arranged in layers in the 12,500-ton detector, with which traces of the particles resulting from the collisions can be recorded. 179 institutions worldwide were involved in developing CMS. In Switzerland, these are the University of Zurich, ETH Zurich and the Paul Scherrer Institute.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0427095621.htm
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Old 04-30-2012, 12:46 PM   #1174
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Old 04-30-2012, 12:52 PM   #1175
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No sound at work, did he say how powerful the laser driver is? To light the fuse I would think it would have to be >500mW
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Old 04-30-2012, 01:09 PM   #1176
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No sound at work, did he say how powerful the laser driver is? To light the fuse I would think it would have to be >500mW
No he didn't say. Has to pretty strong though as you stated.

Speaking of lasers...

World's Most Powerful X-Ray Laser Super-Heats Aluminum Foil to 3.6 Million Degrees
Creating and observing super-hot solid plasma could lead to a greater understanding of fusion processes


In two separate studies, the world's most powerful X-ray laser has been used to build the first atomic X-ray laser pulse, as well as to superheat and control a clump of 2-million-degree matter. The atomic laser could be used to watch biological molecules at work, while the creation of hot dense matter could be used to understand the processes of nuclear fusion.

Researchers at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used the Linac Coherent Light Source, a rapid-fire X-ray laser, to flash-heat a small piece of aluminum foil and create a solid plasma known as hot dense matter. A team led by Sam Vinko, a postdoc at Oxford University, took the temperature of this matter - 2 million degrees Celsius, or 3.6 million degrees Fahrenheit - and the whole process took about a trillionth of a second. The measurements will lead to more accurate models of how hot dense matter forms and behaves. These models could help scientists understand - and maybe someday recreate - the process of nuclear fusion that fuels the sun, according to a news release from SLAC.

Scientists can create plasma from gases using conventional lasers, but you need a super-powerful laser to create a plasma from a solid material. The LCLS' ultra-short wavelengths of light can penetrate a dense solid and look at it, all at the same time. The LCLS is underground in Palo Alto and covers a distance of a little more than a mile. It can create intense bursts of X-ray radiation more than a billion times brighter than any other laser source.

In a separate study, the LCLS was harnessed to build the first-ever atomic-scale X-ray laser, a feat that could open up a whole new field of atomic imaging.

Since the laser was invented more than 50 years ago, scientists have tried to lase at shorter wavelengths, but it's difficult to do because shorter wavelengths require faster atom pumping. But free-electron lasers in the X-ray range can produce superfast pulses of intense energy, so this pumping is now feasible. Scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory used the LCLS to give a pumped-up kick to a cluster of neon atoms. This knocked some electrons up to higher energy states and created a cascade of X-ray emissions - a mini atomic-sized laser.

The atomic laser's light is much more pure, and its pulses are much shorter, so it could be used to tease out sharp details of atomic-scale interactions and phase changes that would otherwise be impossible to see.

Both papers were published today in Nature

SLAC Chamber This photograph shows the interior of a Linac Coherent Light Source SXR experimental chamber, set up for an investigation to create and measure a form of extreme, 2-million-degree matter known as "hot, dense matter." The central part of the frame contains the holder for the material that will be converted by the powerful LCLS laser into hot, dense matter. To the left is an XUV spectrometer and to the right is a small red laser set up for alignment and positioning. University of Oxford/Sam Vinko



http://www.popsci.com/technology/art...omic-processes
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Old 05-02-2012, 08:26 PM   #1177
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I can't remember who was saying that zero-point energy is the new age ether, but I had forgotten that Wilczeck hints at the need for an ether in today's physics.
Click image for larger version

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Old 05-02-2012, 09:24 PM   #1178
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I can't remember who was saying that zero-point energy is the new age ether, but I had forgotten that Wilczeck hints at the need for an ether in today's physics.
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Old 05-02-2012, 09:26 PM   #1179
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In order to account for what is some "new age ether" required?
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Old 05-02-2012, 09:39 PM   #1180
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That picture isn't as big as I had hoped. I dk if you read it or not, but Wilczeck was doing work at 21 that would win him a Nobel prize. On that page he makes a very strong argument that we live in an exotic superconductor and points out that the standard model is based upon this premise. In order for that to be true, it requires that there be some sort of physical ether.
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