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Old 11-30-2012, 09:36 AM   #1541
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Ice on Mercury I always thought it would be too hot
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/me...f20121129.html
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Old 11-30-2012, 10:29 AM   #1542
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Actual picture of DNA
http://mashable.com/2012/11/29/what-dna-looks-like/

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Old 11-30-2012, 10:48 AM   #1543
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So the programming of life is actually a smaller version of punchcards!!
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Old 11-30-2012, 10:59 AM   #1544
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Ice on Mercury I always thought it would be too hot
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/me...f20121129.html
Excellent! Ice/presence of water on Mercury gives us the distinct possibility of future colonization of this planet, which has relatively stable and livable temperatures not far below the surface. That way, when our sun goes nova in a few billion years, we'll have a viable option... no, wait...
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Old 12-01-2012, 01:25 PM   #1545
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LI - FI



London (CNN) --
Haas and his team at the UK's University of Edinburgh, are the brains behind a new patented technology that uses beams of flickering light to transmit digital information wirelessly, a process known as Visible Light Communication (VLC).


"My big idea is to turn light bulbs into broadband communication devices ... so that they not only provide illumination, but an essential utility," he says.
Haas claims that data can be sent by adding a microchip to any humble LED bulb, making it blink on and off at a phenomenal speed, millions of times per second.


"My big idea is to turn light bulbs into broadband communication devices ... so that they not only provide illumination, but an essential utility
Harald Haas, University of Edinburgh
It's this capability that allows LEDs to transmit data in a rapid stream of binary code that, although invisible to the naked eye, can then be detected by a light-sensitive receiver.


"It's a bit like sending a Morse code signal with a torch, but at a much faster rate and using the alphabet that computers understand," explains Haas.
The implication is that wherever you have a light bulb -- and there are an estimated 14 billion of them worldwide -- you have the potential for a wireless Internet connection. In practice, it means that any street lamp could double up as a web hotspot.

But VLC, or "Li-Fi" as it has been nicknamed, does more than just increase Internet accessibility.
The dominant technology used for wireless data transfer, Wi-Fi, is transmitted through radio wave signals. However, radio waves represent only a small fraction of the electromagnetic spectrum and so, as demand for wireless connectivity grows, the supply of available bandwidth diminishes.
The problem is epitomized by the frustrating experience of sitting in an Internet coffee shop, helplessly watching on as more and more people connect their device to the network, causing your browser speed to wither to a snail's pace.


Li-Fi could be the future of the web


"The visible light spectrum is 10,000 times larger than the radio frequency spectrum," he explains.
Less congestion means greater bandwidth and Haas says transmission rates using "Li-Fi" could be as high as one gigabit a second -- meaning that downloads of high-definition films could take less time than sending a text.
For Haas, the beauty of his technology is that -- unlike radio wave signals that are generated from large energy-intensive cell masts -- VLC requires almost no new infrastructure.

"If the light signal is blocked, or when you need to use your device to send information -- you can seamlessly switch back over to radio waves
Harald Haas, University of Edinburgh

"We use what is already there," he says. "The visible light spectrum is unused, it's not regulated, and we can communicate at very high speeds."
But the technology has its limitations.


Thomas Kamalakis, a lecturer at the Department of Informatics and Telematics at the Harokopio University of Athens, commends Haas on his work but warns against overstating its potential just yet.

"Of course one problem is that light can't pass through objects, so if the receiver is inadvertently blocked in any way, then the signal will immediately cut out," Kamalakis says.


VLC is not in competition with WiFi, he says, it is a complimentary technology that should eventually help free up much needed space within the radio wave spectrum.

"We still need Wi-Fi, we still need radio frequency cellular systems. You can't have a light bulb that provides data to a high-speed moving object or to provide data in a remote area where there are trees and walls and obstacles behind," he says.
Although the widespread use of "Li-Fi" is still some way off, it could have some useful, small scale, applications in the short term.
For instance, Haas says it could transform air travel by allowing overhead cabin lights to connect mobiles and laptops in-flight; it could also improve conditions for those working underwater -- such as people on oil rigs -- where radio waves cannot penetrate; LED car lights could even alert drivers when other vehicles are too close.

Haas also turns one of the technology's perceived weaknesses -- the inability of light to penetrate through objects -- into a strength.
"LiFi offers a far more secure form of data transfer because it can only be intercepted by those within a line of sight of the light source," he explains.
"It's a very simple electromagnetic spectrum we can see, and if that is an engine that also provides some of the fundamental needs of modern societies [like] high-speed data communication, wouldn't that be brilliant?"

http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/28/tech/l...rticle_sidebar
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Old 12-02-2012, 10:18 AM   #1546
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Old 12-02-2012, 09:51 PM   #1547
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So the programming of life is actually a smaller version of punchcards!!
The DNA in the pictures is the thin line strung across, not the punchcard.
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Old 12-05-2012, 06:57 AM   #1548
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Mars discovery update:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...-science-nasa/
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Old 12-05-2012, 10:08 AM   #1549
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NASA really needs to recalibrate their excitement scale. "One for the history books" should only be reserved for something the public at large would find exciting, not just science nerds.


This is an interesting take on the Fermi Paradox and seems plausible if technological singularities occur in every civilization.
http://news.discovery.com/space/do-r...xy-121201.html
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If, on a grand cosmic evolutionary scale, artificial intelligence inevitably supersedes its flesh and blood builders it could be an inevitable biological phase transition for technological civilizations.

This idea of the human condition being transitional was reflected in the writings of Existentialist Friedrich Nietzsche: "Man is a rope, tied between beast and overman--a rope over an abyss. What is great in man is that he is a bridge and not an end, ..."

Because the conquest by machines might happen in less than two centuries of technological evolution, the consequences would be that there's nobody out there for us to talk to.
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Old 12-05-2012, 10:17 AM   #1550
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This is an interesting take on the Fermi Paradox and seems plausible if technological singularities occur in every civilization.
http://news.discovery.com/space/do-r...xy-121201.html
In two centuries there will be no one left to talk to?


Some people have that problem now, with the use of facebook, texting etc...
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Old 12-06-2012, 11:12 AM   #1551
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Some researchers have developed a method for "printing" drugs. We're one step closer to an atomic printer.
http://www.kurzweilai.net/automated-...-self-assembly
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Using a simple “drag-and-drop” computer interface and DNA self-assembly techniques, Parabon NanoLabs researchers have developed a new automated method of drug development that could reduce the time required to create and test medications, with the support of an NSF Technology Enhancement for Commercial Partnerships grant.

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In two centuries there will be no one left to talk to?


Some people have that problem now, with the use of facebook, texting etc...
Personally I don't think it's that bleak. I see the future as more of a biomechanical civilization than purely mechanical. Humans 200 years from now won't be what we call humans today, but the next evolutionary step.
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Old 12-06-2012, 11:54 AM   #1552
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Some researchers have developed a method for "printing" drugs. We're one step closer to an atomic printer.
http://www.kurzweilai.net/automated-...-self-assembly

Cool. Then if I am sick at home or in the Space Station and I need Tetracycline because I have the flu, I can just print out a few pills and start getting better.


Personally I don't think it's that bleak. I see the future as more of a biomechanical civilization than purely mechanical. Humans 200 years from now won't be what we call humans today, but the next evolutionary step.
I think that in the future, that there will be more peace and fewer wars. Because as we get more advanced technologically, it will be easier to wage war and inflict violence. Look at the use of drones , camoflauge techniques, and the expansion of missile and nuclear technology. We will be forced to get along with each other.

And I think that the average person will be smarter, healthier and probably have 2,3 careers in their lives, work fewer hours and generally lead happier lives.

I don't see us changing medically. We might live longer and debilitating illnesses will be cured. I don't see us having bio mechanical arms, chip implants or eyes with infrared vision. But I do see stem cell implants curing illnesses, the use of color therapy and music aiding recovery. I also see prenatal problems being cured inutero and DNA scans preventing problems before they occur.
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Old 12-06-2012, 12:35 PM   #1553
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IMO it won't be as obvious as a bionic arm, I'm thinking implants and nanobots that you would never see. There won't be such an explicit line between man and machine.

Today: New curved display could be used as contact lens for augmented reality
http://phys.org/news/2012-12-breakth...tact-lens.html

April: DARPA placed and order for contact lens displays
http://phys.org/news/2012-04-darpa-s...ct-lenses.html

Nanobots could replace blood cells and do their job more efficiently
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisf...omment.comment

Monkeys intelligence increased with brain implant
http://io9.com/5943379/for-the-first...ld-you-be-next
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Old 12-06-2012, 12:41 PM   #1554
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Like the guy's arm in I-Robot?!

I'm perfectly fine with becoming a Cyborg instead of dealing with this **** body.
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Old 12-06-2012, 02:53 PM   #1555
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Like the guy's arm in I-Robot?!

I'm perfectly fine with becoming a Cyborg instead of dealing with this **** body.
What if your body is a gift with hidden potential that you just need to unlock? What if you have powers that are beyond the common man's perception that others may try to take from you and replace with artificial components?

Just kidding, you should become a robot
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Old 12-06-2012, 04:49 PM   #1556
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IMO it won't be as obvious as a bionic arm, I'm thinking implants and nanobots that you would never see. There won't be such an explicit line between man and machine.

Today: New curved display could be used as contact lens for augmented reality
http://phys.org/news/2012-12-breakth...tact-lens.htmlpacemaker inserts etc...

I have also read that certain light spectrums and different levels of music can impact health.

I think it will become more noninvasive. Thirty , Forty years ago they used to have surgery on someone to tell what was wrong sew them up, tell the patient their problem and then operate. Now we have better xray machines, MRI and ultrasounds to determine problems with almost absolute accuracy. And I think it will get even better.

I remember seeing a few times that (at least in some species) if an arm or a leg is amputated then it will regrow if you don't sew up the end of the arm or leg like we do for humans. I think with stem cell technology they will figure out ways to regrow human organs naturally without organ transplants ,

April: DARPA placed and order for contact lens displays
http://phys.org/news/2012-04-darpa-s...ct-lenses.html

Nanobots could replace blood cells and do their job more efficiently
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisf...omment.comment

Monkeys intelligence increased with brain implant
http://io9.com/5943379/for-the-first...ld-you-be-next
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What if your body is a gift with hidden potential that you just need to unlock? What if you have powers that are beyond the common man's perception that others may try to take from you and replace with artificial components?

Just kidding, you should become a robot

Yeah, DARPA has some interesting projects on the shelf. Infrared vision, some kind of operation that makes arms as strong as an ape, some kind of steroid that will keep you going for a week without sleep, good stuff there. I hope if it is possible we do it before the Russians or the Chinese.


I would love to take a tour of DARPA. It would better than taking a tour with Q showing 007 all his new gadgets. For starters I would like to see the new Harry Potter disappearing blanket.
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Old 12-06-2012, 04:59 PM   #1557
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I have also read that certain light spectrums and different levels of music can impact health.

I think it will become more noninvasive. Thirty , Forty years ago they used to have surgery on someone to tell what was wrong sew them up, tell the patient their problem and then operate. Now we have better xray machines, MRI and ultrasounds to determine problems with almost absolute accuracy. And I think it will get even better.
I've read about ultra-low frequency sound waves messing with peoples' heads and stomachs. And it will be beyond non-invasive, it will be preventative. We'll have nanobots that constantly monitor our health and intervene as soon as anything gets out of kilter.
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Old 12-06-2012, 05:06 PM   #1558
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Was watching the show "dark matters" on science channel. They were covering ultra low sound. Apparently, they are also a banned weapon now even though no country officially worked on such research

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Old 12-06-2012, 08:52 PM   #1559
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thank you, that was a great read, technology is so awesome, year by year. hats off to the great Dr.s and engineers involved in producing such an advanced technological device
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Old 12-06-2012, 09:28 PM   #1560
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Was watching the show "dark matters" on science channel. They were covering ultra low sound. Apparently, they are also a banned weapon now even though no country officially worked on such research

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What exactly did they say was banned? Anyone can generate an ultra low frequency with the right equipment.
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