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Old 09-14-2011, 01:13 PM   #1
OrientBlau
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Oil Separator CCV Hose Repair (PHOTOS)

With the weather still nice, I wanted to tackle the infamous CCV repair before it gets too cold, as I can only wrench in the streets. Aside from the CCV Kit and associated hoses, I also bought the updated single-shaft guide tube, ICV, DISA, intake boots and clamps, along with any associated screws, bolts and gaskets involved in the repair.

All said and done, the repair wasnt nearly as daunting as others have made it out to be. It does take a long time to remove and replace parts and it kills your back. My biggest concern was the difficulty many had with connecting the hose which runs between the intake runners. Luckily, it took me less than 5 minutes of trying before I successfully connected it. All the previous DIYers were a big help in pointing this out. Im sure it would've taken much longer without this knowledge. To ensure the success of this connection, I marked both ends of the connections with a white marker to indicate a locked position by lining up the marks.

I've included some familiarity photos below for those who plan to tackle this in the future. It was very helpful for me to view others DIY pics and so I want to contribute back for others to study this repair.

I'm a bit pressed for time right now, so I will perhaps append the post later and include more detailed steps and notes along with part numbers.


EDIT: I'm back.


In general, my car runs pretty well and I have no codes to speak of or at least no check engine lights. Over the past year, I've gradually performed a lot of preventive maintenance as the car had been feeling a bit tired. This all started around 52K and I'm now just miles shy of 60K. There had been some performance issues, and a lot of things helped improve that. Things like a fuel filter, air filter, spark plugs, O2 sensors, MAF cleaning, etc.

Even though the car was running fairly well, I suspected that my DISA was failing or failed. The common test of unplugging the DISA didn't yield any change and was ultimately inconclusive. However, I did have a very pronounced lag and surge around the 3750 RPM range which points to the DISA. The car would seem to hesitate and then surge, with the TACH needle swinging quickly to ~6K. Anyway, I researched this issue ad nauseum and concluded that I either need a new DISA or a reflash as per the SIB which requires the ECU to be sent out for reflashing. Essentially, the ECU interprets the DISA or resonator valve opening as a misfire and retards the timing.

Although I knew I didn't have any tell-tale signs of an impending CCV issue, I wanted to go ahead and replace it anyway, as I had intentions to do the DISA, ICV and boots at some point. I figured the CCV was probably well worn anyhow. There did happen to be quite a bit of oil inside the intake and that concerned me. Not sure how common that is for this design or if the CCV contributed to it. You can see it in the photos below. Anyway, after removing the DISA, I was literally shocked to see it totally blown with no tension or resistance at all. At 60K my DISA was failed and for quite a while it would appear. So very glad I had a new one on hand.

The ICV wasn't too bad (it was dirty but 'clunked' around freely), but rather than deal with cleaning etc, it was more convenient for me to just buy a new one. It never hurts to have new parts. I also replaced the gray-colored j-shape grommet, which fits into the intake. This should be replaced as well.

Some folks who do the CCV just clean out their old dipstick, which I suppose is fine. BMW did go to the effort (for some empirical reason) to redesign it so that it is no longer double-shafted and drains into a single shaft. The double wall creates an environment for clogging which may send oil upstream. The improved design now allows CCV oil to more easily drain into a wider area.

I highly recommend that anyone performing this repair invest in a new set of boots. They can be had for cheap. Yours are most likely cracked or will eventually and this is a perfect time to replace them. A more likely reason to replace them is that you will have to cut them in order to get to the clamp bolts tucked away unkindly from the factory. Cutting them provides a little more room, although if your boots are really still good you can reuse them if you're able to loosen the bolts. A spinner driver and some extensions with knuckle or flex sockets will help too. If you remove the corner partition and move the brake booster hoses aside, you can get a better reach into the boot clamps. It is doable, but most cut them.

Some tips.
Keep track of your screws. Keep things in ziplock bags and label them. Clean the electrical connectors with QD electrical contact cleaner and compressed air. Afterwards, wrap in some shop towel, tape and label. Have a magnetic telescope handy. While tightening one of the bolts, my socket came off and fell into the engine bay. I freaked out and luckily retrieved it. A mirror is good to have too.

Oh yeah, the only thing I used a torque wrench for, were the TB bolts. These require 9.9 Nm. When replacing the TB you should also put in a new gasket.



Here are the parts I ordered.

Although these parts should fit most e46s, you should always consult realOEM.com or the like to determine your specific vehicles need.


11617534237 OIL SEPARATOR CCV KIT
11617501566 Pressure regulating valve (included in kit)
11611432559 Vent Pipe (included in kit)
11617504535 Connecting line (included in kit)
11157532649 VENT HOSE
11617504536 RETURN PIPE
11727545323 VACUUM HOSE (may not need if capped off)

11431717666 DIPSTICK O-RING (2 TOP)
11431740045 DIPSTICK GUIDE O-RING (BOTTOM)
11437565437 DIPSTICK GUIDE TUBE (updated - SINGLE-SHAFT)
11431436293 DIPSTICK
07119900259 DIPSTICK HEX BOLT

11617544805 DISA ADJUSTER UNIT
13411744713 IDLE CONTROL VALVE
11611437453 ICV RUBBER GROMMET
11611432564 ICV RUBBER MOUNTING
13547504729 THROTTLE BODY GASKET
07119903862 THROTTLE BODY BOLTS
11611440318 DISTRIBUTION PIECE (comes with the 6 o-rings)
11617502761 DISTRIBUTOR O-RINGS (replace 6 o-rings if keeping)





Genuine BMW Parts.
Note the updated dipstick guide tube with a single-shaft.



The only difference between the regular and cold weather version is the insulation held on by o-rings.


Connecting Line marked for the LOCKED position.



Connecting line in the UNLOCKED position.



Connecting line in the UNLOCKED insertion postion. Line up the white OS mark to the 'split' on the hose. This is the position to insert and seat the hose on the OS. Once fully seated, it is turned until the NEXT TWO white marks line up.



Connecting line and OS in the LOCKED position.



OS and connecting line in LOCKED position.



Removal of cabin air filter and housing along with the engine cover.



Note that this wire bundle is held together by a zip-tie on the last distribution nozzle.


The airbox and MAF need to be removed.



Top and bottom of the BMW Performance intake removed.



It was difficult to pry off the 'F' piece, so I made an incision to the boot to help loosen it.



This partition should be removed to provide more access to the boot clamps. Remove the weather strip and loosen the TWO plastic twist-lock screws, before pulling the partition up.



With the partition removed, you have much more space to work with.



The intake section where the DISA valve has been removed. Look at all that oil and crap!



DISA intake section.



DISA intake section. You can see the condensation droplets on the oiled surface.



Here's where the DISA pin fully seats to the rear.






This is the fuel breather line. The rubber piece needs to slide off the metal hanger and the connector disconnected.


Here is the ICV connector from the wire box below. The ICV wire needs to be disconnected.



Wire box nuts need to be removed.



Here's the dipstick guide tube bolt which needs to be removed. Be sure to note how the guide tube hose snakes inbetween hoses to the OS.



Here's a better shot of the hose coming from the guide tube. Also note the attached wires which must be unclipped.




Wire box nut loosened.



Wire box loosened.
Note the grey ICV grommet which should be replaced. Make sure you orient it properly to the tab fitting.



ICV removed. The throttle body needs to be removed as well.



Make sure you label your connectors so you know where they go afterwards.


DISA, ICV, throttle body and wire box removed.
You can see the OS off to the left. Note that my vacuum line is plugged or capped off.



The oil separator and the TWO screws which hold it into place.



The connecting line attached to OS.



Another shot of the OS.



Move the Post-cat O2 sensors aside and remove the air distribution piece.
This air distributor is integral to the CCV system and can get clogged up too. I went and replaced this piece rather than clean it. The older one weighs more than the new one due to the oil saturation.



This connector should be unplugged as well.



Distributor piece removed.



Hose leading to VANOS/Valve cover. No signs of 'mayo.'


Here is the CCV system pulled out. I cut the hoses for easier removal.



With everything out, you should clean the connectors with electric contact cleaner and compressed air. Afterwards, be sure to tape them up and label them.



Dipstick guide tube being removed from the oil pan.



The removed CCV hoses and the old, double-shafted guide tube.



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Last edited by OrientBlau; 09-16-2011 at 12:59 AM.
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Old 09-14-2011, 01:18 PM   #2
yetieater
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Would appreciate it if you posted details on when you performed this repair, the number of miles that you put on the old system, how long it took you to do this, and the parts cost. I found a kit on Bavauto for $170.
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Old 09-14-2011, 03:19 PM   #3
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Beautiful pics, thank you!
Parts arriving today for this project. This post will help.
Thanks again.
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Old 09-14-2011, 03:26 PM   #4
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Excellent post, helps also when you caption a picture to circle the parts you are talking about so it's easy to see where things are..
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Old 09-14-2011, 04:45 PM   #5
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Great information. Thanks for the write-up and photos. Do you have a detailed list of the extra parts that you purchased in addition to the CCV kit?

Interesting your comment that this job was tough on your back. I sent my car along with the CCV kit out to a mechanic who is an older German gentleman. He said that it was too much for his back and he refused to do the job! So, now I will have to find someone else to do it or find the time to do it myself.
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Old 09-14-2011, 06:38 PM   #6
OrientBlau
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yetieater View Post
Would appreciate it if you posted details on when you performed this repair, the number of miles that you put on the old system, how long it took you to do this, and the parts cost. I found a kit on Bavauto for $170.
I'm gonna update the post now with all pertinent info.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mmaldin View Post
Beautiful pics, thank you!
Parts arriving today for this project. This post will help.
Thanks again.
Thanks!

If you've any questions, let me know.

Quote:
Originally Posted by trizzuth View Post
Excellent post, helps also when you caption a picture to circle the parts you are talking about so it's easy to see where things are..
I agree. I've been super busy and didnt find the time. Maybe I'll fix it later. Let me know, if anything needs clarification, though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IxNay View Post
Great information. Thanks for the write-up and photos. Do you have a detailed list of the extra parts that you purchased in addition to the CCV kit?

Interesting your comment that this job was tough on your back. I sent my car along with the CCV kit out to a mechanic who is an older German gentleman. He said that it was too much for his back and he refused to do the job! So, now I will have to find someone else to do it or find the time to do it myself.
I'm gonna list the parts and stuff now.

Smart German dude!

Yeah, this is a real killer on your back or at least for me. I dont regularly exercise or strain those particular muscles, and when I was done, my legs and back were incredibly achy! The job requires you to do a lot of bending into the crevices to see and feel bolts, parts and to ratchet back and forth in small arcs ,since full travel is often not posible.
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Old 09-14-2011, 09:41 PM   #7
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What is the difference in the 2 dipstick guides?
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Old 09-14-2011, 10:03 PM   #8
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I found the kit cheapest at http://www.getbmwparts.com

I however did not use the included vacuum line and I did not replace dipstick tube. I would also reccommend to do the oil filter housing gasket at the same time. Once you remove the oil filter housing it allows for more room to get to the ccv. Wish I had these pictures when I did mine.

Oh btw if anyone doing this repair didn't label the electrical connections, don't sweat it. The wire are certain lengths and the connections have different terminals. Just look at the terminal before jamming it in.
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Old 09-15-2011, 12:31 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by E46 Coupe View Post
What is the difference in the 2 dipstick guides?
The older flavor has an inner/outer, two tube design. The two-in-one idea was sound but later discovered that any restriction in the small gap could block the CCV return path resulting in sucking oil into the intake.

Several cold weather owners reported that condensed water in the narrow tube can potentially freeze blocking oil flow. A dipstick ice-jam! The newer part has a single large tube. I'm switching mine out 'cause newer is better right?

Okay, maybe I read too much on this stupid site loaded with OCD owners.
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Old 09-15-2011, 12:43 AM   #10
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Awesome info thanks! Do you happen to know when the part was superceded? ie. which MY did they start using the updated part?
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Old 09-15-2011, 12:59 AM   #11
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Sorry, I have no absolute info. on the part but believe it is an afterthought available after the production years. Maybe it can be visually inspected prior to ordering?

Oh, I forgot to compliment the OP for an outstanding post effort. This baby is bookmarked for my upcoming surgery.

Do they still make Doans Pills for backache?
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Old 09-15-2011, 08:18 AM   #12
OrientBlau
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Originally Posted by E46 Coupe View Post
What is the difference in the 2 dipstick guides?
The old guide tube has a double-shaft whereas the new one has a single-shaft. In other words, the lower shaft is split into two concentric cylinders. The OS oil is supposed to drain back into the oil pan. The path the oil travels out of the OS is through a hose which leads to a spilt in the lower portion of the guide tube. The original design allowed the oil to drain inbetween the inner and outter wall the double-shaft into the oil pan. Meanwhile, the inner shaft is where the dipstick resides and is pulled in and out of. The NEW design now incorporates a single shaft so that oil draining from the OS has a much wider guage to drain into, inhibiting any clogging. It is this clogging which takes place insdie this narrow double shaft which causes oil to flow back upstream and into your cylinders causing a possible hydrolock situation.

Here's a photo I just found on bimmer forums.

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Old 09-15-2011, 08:37 AM   #13
OrientBlau
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Oh btw if anyone doing this repair didn't label the electrical connections, don't sweat it. The wire are certain lengths and the connections have different terminals. Just look at the terminal before jamming it in.
True. I believe they are all unique connections.

Here are all the connectors I think I had to disconnect in total:

MAF
DISA
ICV
TB
OFH (two)
Fuel Breather
Alternator
Fuel Rail

(did I forget any?)
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Old 10-02-2011, 05:51 PM   #14
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Orientblau the part 11437565437 don't exist on Realoem,where you buy it?
thanks
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Old 10-02-2011, 09:26 PM   #15
OrientBlau
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Orientblau the part 11437565437 don't exist on Realoem,where you buy it?
thanks
penskeparts.com has the part listed for $162.00

ECSTuning.com has it for $132.92
http://www.ecstuning.com/Search/1143...34237/ES24265/
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Old 10-02-2011, 10:13 PM   #16
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perfect just what I will be doing either this winter or next spring
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Old 10-02-2011, 10:28 PM   #17
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Those o2 sensors, arent they PRE cat?
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Old 10-03-2011, 09:03 AM   #18
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Those o2 sensors, arent they PRE cat?
What O2 sensors are you refering to?

Pre-cat O2 sensors should be replaced no later than 100K and probably earlier. I did mine around 53K.

Pre-cat has a great affect on fuel mixture and can affect peformance and mileage.

Post-cat O2 sensors are mainly for monitoring the emissions and have no affect on performance or mixture. These do not have to be replaced unless you fail an emissions test due to it being faulty.

O2 sensors should always be replaced in pairs.
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Old 10-03-2011, 09:31 AM   #19
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you speak of replacing the pre cat O2 sensors. Are codes thrown when replacement is needed or are you doing this as a preventive measure?
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Old 10-03-2011, 09:51 AM   #20
OrientBlau
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you speak of replacing the pre cat O2 sensors. Are codes thrown when replacement is needed or are you doing this as a preventive measure?
Bad O2'swill definitely throw a code, eventually.

However, you will experience degraded performance and mileage before this occurs as they gradually get dirty/coated and do not sense the exhaust as well. The service life of heated O2s are rated for 100K and unheated to 50K. Its your prerogative to replace them early if you want.
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