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Old 12-08-2014, 09:36 AM   #1
DylloS
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So I went to the Juggernaut Powerlifting seminar...

Awesome time. Chad Wesley Smith and Brandon Lilly were there.

It was very informative. Nothing ground breaking but mainly validating what most of us believe. The main things are worrying about the main lifts, adding in accessory work to focus on weak points of the lifts (this was big for me). They talked a lot about doing work specific to the muscles which are causing the failures. Lilly works his lats 6 days a week lol. They spoke about adding in some BB style lifts for hypertophy (bigger muscles=stronger). Not worrying about all the stupid crap that doesn't matter. They talked about how the elite people really only worry about a few lifts and the more beginner types can improve with a variety of movements. Think of a pyramid, the top is the elite and the bottom is a beginner. Lilly gave a really motivating little speech. Just about being good if you want and if you suck that;s your choice. I can see why some may not like these guys though. They are very direct, no bs kind of people. If you're doing something wrong you were told about it. Obviously they're not big on westsides methods. Not because they do so many different things but because they just add some much stuff into the mix when they believe some other kind of squat accessory work would be better. I got a lot of good tips for all the lifts. My back tightness in the squat was an issue. I learned to really flex the upper back and keep it that way. Seems like it was a common issue and the reason for many fails. I learned leg drive on my bench, and I got the reflex down on the deadlift. I used to just set up, sit there and lift cold. Alex actually had me doing this recently where I stretch the hams, grab the bar, shoot down and pull.
It was a lot of info so maybe I can relay what I learned if there is any question specif to a certain part.
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Old 12-08-2014, 04:17 PM   #2
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Just saw this. Great info, thanks. I try to keep the upper back tight during squats but I lose it after the first rep when I have to breathe. Then it's not that easy to flex it again. Keeping the grip width narrow helps a bit.

What squat accessory work they recommend? There is a nice review of Lilly's cube method on powerliftingtowin youtube channel where it's relation to westside method is partially mentioned.

Also, I find it funny that all these guys who has westside methods backgrounds don't advocate it anymore. Another example is Dan Green.
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Old 12-08-2014, 04:45 PM   #3
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Just saw this. Great info, thanks. I try to keep the upper back tight during squats but I lose it after the first rep when I have to breathe. Then it's not that easy to flex it again. Keeping the grip width narrow helps a bit.

What squat accessory work they recommend? There is a nice review of Lilly's cube method on powerliftingtowin youtube channel where it's relation to westside method is partially mentioned.

Also, I find it funny that all these guys who has westside methods backgrounds don't advocate it anymore. Another example is Dan Green.
Yea they say a lot of their stalls were because of the westside methods. Plus those are all geared lifters so things work different in suits.

The work they recommend are box squats, pause squats, squats off pins, then front sqauts and all those variations. Oh, even changing foot placement on regular back squats. just trying everything. Just not very big fans of bands and chains.
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Old 12-08-2014, 04:54 PM   #4
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I should get back to doing pin squats. Pretty tough to get the weight moving from a dead stop.

Agreed on bands and chains. They don't help get past the sticking point on the main lifts, I don't see the point of those for powerlifting purposes.

edit: One thing I want to try is this to get the bench up (referring to the bamboo bar presses). Looks like a pretty good way to train the upper nervous system:

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Last edited by SeanC; 12-08-2014 at 04:58 PM.
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Old 12-08-2014, 09:11 PM   #5
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They talked very highly about the bamboo bar
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Old 12-08-2014, 09:26 PM   #6
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They talked very highly about the bamboo bar
Amazing! Just have to find one now.
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Old 12-09-2014, 05:36 AM   #7
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These seminars are great but just how they dislike westside methods, there's quite a few JTS methods that I do not like. I know Eric Lillibridge personally and we've had many discussions about different topics and methods and have had very different views on assistance work and even volume in working sets. Cube and other methods do not have the volume I have personally found to work for myself and my body.

Its all about finding what works for you. The best way to enter one of these seminars is not to go try and find different training methods (which too many ppl do), but rather to pick up new ideas to add to your existing training, new training cues and most importantly to go in and find new motivation to train harder than you already are.

The problem is that too many beginner to intermediate lifters go into these and come out with completely new training methodologies. They think that because these guys are some of the best in the game that their training methods and programming HAVE to work for them. This is what separates the intermediate lifter from someone who is a few levels higher in experience.

For example, I do not do much assistance work. Most days I do none at all. I NEVER have assistance work after squats and rarely do I after deadlifting. I find that with my volume of training at >85% of max 95% of the time it is just too much for my body to handle and a waste of time.

Am I right and those who do assistance work wrong? No, not at all. Just different programming ideas and methodologies. I've been able to pull over 3.5x my bodyweight and squat more than 3x bodyweight but my high volume programming doesnt work for everyone. The key is finding the correct volume, exercise selection and balance of accessory work mixed with frequency to keep your body healthy and always moving upwards.
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Old 12-09-2014, 10:09 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by bAby norAA View Post
These seminars are great but just how they dislike westside methods, there's quite a few JTS methods that I do not like. I know Eric Lillibridge personally and we've had many discussions about different topics and methods and have had very different views on assistance work and even volume in working sets. Cube and other methods do not have the volume I have personally found to work for myself and my body.

Its all about finding what works for you. The best way to enter one of these seminars is not to go try and find different training methods (which too many ppl do), but rather to pick up new ideas to add to your existing training, new training cues and most importantly to go in and find new motivation to train harder than you already are.

The problem is that too many beginner to intermediate lifters go into these and come out with completely new training methodologies. They think that because these guys are some of the best in the game that their training methods and programming HAVE to work for them. This is what separates the intermediate lifter from someone who is a few levels higher in experience.

For example, I do not do much assistance work. Most days I do none at all. I NEVER have assistance work after squats and rarely do I after deadlifting. I find that with my volume of training at >85% of max 95% of the time it is just too much for my body to handle and a waste of time.

Am I right and those who do assistance work wrong? No, not at all. Just different programming ideas and methodologies. I've been able to pull over 3.5x my bodyweight and squat more than 3x bodyweight but my high volume programming doesnt work for everyone. The key is finding the correct volume, exercise selection and balance of accessory work mixed with frequency to keep your body healthy and always moving upwards.
I agree completely. I go to these things and pick up tips here and there. I feel like I know enough now and don't want to be that guy that hears something new and jumps all over it.

They sh1tty thing is finding what works for you can take years of trial an error lol.
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