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DIY: Do It Yourself
Post here to share or improve your wrench turning skills! All BMW E46 DIY tips, tales, and projects discussed inside. Learn to work on your car and know the right BMW parts you will need!

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Old 06-18-2012, 12:58 PM   #1
jjrichar
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Project ZF 5HP19 transmission: Valve Body

Valve Body

Link to other parts of the project
http://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=928248

Ensure you read the post above with regard to cleanliness, organization of your workspace, and the document links that are there.

Changing of gears inside the transmission is done by engaging or releasing a series of clutches that connect the different gears inside the engine. The clutches are controlled by the valve body. The valve body is basically a hydraulic unit. Oil pressure for the unit is provided by the oil pump.

The valve body is at the bottom of the transmission. When you open the pan, itís the big lumpy metal thing that the filter is attached to. It comprises of a number of separate valve bodies that are bolted together to form the one unit. Also it has the solenoids that control oil flow, as well as the electrical connections for these.

Why would you want to pull this out and work on it? From the reading Iíve done, this is the first part of the transmission that will deteriorate. It wonít wear like you think, but there are plastic and rubber components, as well as lots of springs that work like an orchestra to give you the beautiful gear transitions that you love. When these start to deteriorate, the gear changes will become rough, and the transmission just wonít work like it used to. There is probably no significant wear on the actual transmission parts at this time, but with more time, this will happen because the valve body isnít doing its job properly. Fixing the valve body is probably going to be very good for the longevity of the remainder of the transmission.

Before we start, this isnít for the faint hearted. If you are someone who is a bit disorganized, and you tend to lose things, this may not be the job for you. There are about 150 individual components in here. There are lots of things that look the same but arenít, and if things get mixed up, it just wonít work properly. Also, it is essential that when assembled, it is perfectly clean. Any foreign bodies in here are just going to jam things, and stop it working. The way I cleaned and organized things (as I described in the intro post) seemed to work well. I would suggest something like this.

The good news is that it is definitely a DIY that can be done, and it can be done with the transmission still in the car.

First, put it on jacks like you are going to do a transmission oil change. Drop the pan and remove the filter.

Prior to removing the body, there are some electrical items that need removing.
1. Unbolt the output speed sensor and leave it hanging.
2. Disconnect the plug for the input speed sensor. The input speed sensor (turbine speed sensor) is bolted underneath, and will remain in the transmission when the valve body is removed.
3. Push in the big electrical plug from the outside.
4. The plugs on the solenoids stay in place, and the whole harness will come out with the valve body.











Now remove the valve body. Below is a diagram of the bolts that you will see. You will notice the bolt heads are either large or small. They both take a T27 torx, but the bolt head and actual bolt sizes are different. The bolts with the large head are those that are holding the valve body to the transmission case. These are the ones you need to remove. Itís pretty easy to see, but if you are having trouble, an easy way is to get a socket (I found a 10mm worked well) and try and fit it over the heads of the bolts. The small ones fit, the large ones didnít.

The small bolts are there to hold the individual components of the valve body together. Donít remove them at this stage.






Donít remove all the bolts at this stage. Have a look at the photos below. On the other side where you canít see is a couple of large plastic connectors that go to the oil pump. They are jammed in there with O rings. If you remove all the bolts and allow it to swing down, these may break.

Also, the valve body is quite heavy. Be ready for this weight when removing. I expect a lot more oil will come out as well. Personally, Iíd have some sort of jack ready to gradually lower it.









When you remove the valve body, my suggestion is to make a stand for it. This is what I made. It worked well. The problem with the valve body is that it is heavy, slippery, an awkward shape, and there are a lot of machined faces that mount directly to the transmission body without gaskets and are used for oil flow. Damage to these would be bad.









Here are some photos that show the different components of the body, and how to disconnect things.



























With the electrical harness disconnected, itís now time to dismantle the body. Remove the 6 solenoids at the back now, but donít remove the single one until you remove that body. The solenoids that are the same colour are interchangeable, as they are the same part number. You can take some photos if you like, but they will only fit in the place for that type of solenoid.

Remove the individual bodies and dismantle all the components and clean, sort etc. The springs and pistons are held in by a couple of means. Here are a couple of photos that show how this all fits.

IMPORTANT: When you are pulling this stuff apart, you must keep track of where every individual component goes. My suggestion is this. Have the valve body diagram open and check that it looks the same as you remove the components. Some of it wonít because the document is for a different transmission model. If it is different, take a photo of where it came from and the orientation of the components for assembly.



























Once the individual bodies are off, you can remove the spacer plate and gasket.









And observe the magic below.









As per the valve body guide, you can check the electrics if you need to. I found some issues here. The input speed sensor showed an infinite resistance. Bad. I also found the same with two of the solenoids. I checked the solenoids with the harness removed, and they were fine. I consequently found that one of the earth wires on the harness had a break. These need replacing before going back into a car. Note the wiring diagram in the valve body document is slightly different to what is in this transmission.






For assembly, my advice is as follows:
1. Assemble one body at a time. When together, wrap it up until you are ready to put the whole body together.
2. When putting all the components in the transfer plate, take your time and go over it a couple of times.
3. Put the lower big bodies on first, then the smaller upper bodies. Have the single solenoid attached to the upper rear body before installation. Connect the other 6 solenoids after you have the lower rear body connected.
4. Connect the electrics after the whole body is together.
5. When putting in the car, use some sort of jack to take the weight. Push the main harness plug up in the area where it needs to go, but only push it home when the valve body has been attached. Ensure the manual selector valve detent is engaged with the manual selector lever.
6. When all attached, fit a new filter and gasket. Fit pan and fill with oil as per the oil pan post.


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Old 06-18-2012, 01:01 PM   #2
jjrichar
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Old 06-18-2012, 09:53 PM   #3
jdhutchin
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Wow, thanks for the great writeup and pictures! Engine stuff seems more available, but I've never seen someone dissect the inside of a transmission.
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Old 06-20-2012, 12:56 AM   #4
FreshMint
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Great post! Too bad I have the 5L40E valve body

So i'm currently having an issue with no reverse that happens occasionally - I'm pretty sure its the valve body.. I've read everywhere that repairing the valve body is very complicated.

What about simply removing it and replacing it with a re-manufactured unit? Is it as simply as unbolting it and rebolting a new one? I've heard that there are tons of ball bearings and springs in these things. Will the simple removal of one allow all those little things to come free and possibly come apart? Or is it 1 contained unit?

I'm trying to decide if replacing the valve body is something that i'm capable of.
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Old 06-20-2012, 07:27 AM   #5
jjrichar
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Removing the entire valve body unit won't have anything fall out like you are worried about. It's only if you start to pull apart the valve body itself. Replacing just the valve body is a pretty simple process. To be honest with you, like most things with these projects I've been doing, I'm pretty concerned when I start, but by the end, I don't know what the fuss is all about. Re-conditoning your own valve body is going to be a far less expensive option than replacing it, and it is in my opinion, not that difficult a DIY.
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Old 06-21-2012, 10:58 PM   #6
FreshMint
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjrichar View Post
Removing the entire valve body unit won't have anything fall out like you are worried about. It's only if you start to pull apart the valve body itself. Replacing just the valve body is a pretty simple process. To be honest with you, like most things with these projects I've been doing, I'm pretty concerned when I start, but by the end, I don't know what the fuss is all about. Re-conditoning your own valve body is going to be a far less expensive option than replacing it, and it is in my opinion, not that difficult a DIY.
Thanks man, you gave me the courage to turn down a quote for 1300$ to replace a valve body today!

Hope it all goes well!
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Old 06-22-2012, 10:16 AM   #7
jjrichar
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Good luck. I'm not sure how much research you've done into this no reverse problem of the 5L40E, but it does look a bit involved. Have a look at the link below if you haven't already. It explains a lot about what the problems are, and solutions. The work required seems to be very involved. Reaming bores etc. Whilst I'm all about a good DIY, this procedure seems to be something that may need to be done by a professional. It does however give some basic pictures of how to remove the valve body so you can check it for yourself. Also, the sonnax site has pictures of the valve body to enable you to pull it apart for evaluation. It seems like a very different setup to what is in a 5HP19.

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=458451

All the best.
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Old 06-22-2012, 10:58 PM   #8
FreshMint
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjrichar View Post
Good luck. I'm not sure how much research you've done into this no reverse problem of the 5L40E, but it does look a bit involved. Have a look at the link below if you haven't already. It explains a lot about what the problems are, and solutions. The work required seems to be very involved. Reaming bores etc. Whilst I'm all about a good DIY, this procedure seems to be something that may need to be done by a professional. It does however give some basic pictures of how to remove the valve body so you can check it for yourself. Also, the sonnax site has pictures of the valve body to enable you to pull it apart for evaluation. It seems like a very different setup to what is in a 5HP19.

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=458451

All the best.
Thanks for the link - i've read through that tread before. I won't be repairing the valvebody myself - I'm just going to install a re manufactured one.
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Old 06-25-2012, 10:16 PM   #9
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Really nice! I'll be adding this to my bookmarks until I can find some time to swap in a 6 speed MANual this winter hopefully. I've rebuilt a couple transmissions gear wise, but have never dived into rebuilding a valve body. Considering that I can build a 500 component circuit board from scratch without errors, this looks extremely easy to do. Thanks a ton for your time in laying this out in such an easily digestible manner!!

Question, was there anything actually bad mechanically with the valve body when you did this? Were the problems that led to the valve body rebuild mainly related to the bad wiring harness, sensors, & solenoids, or were there actual parts inside the valve body that were worn, plugged, and/or stuck? In the pics, the actual mechanicals & replaceable parts inside the valve body didn't look how I would think they would; things looked pretty clean overall & didn't have the gunk & gobs of metal particles I was envisioning.

I wonder how common the electrical problems are compared to actual valve body mechanical part failure. It's kinda surprising that wires just broke especially with no mechanical load on them & how many electrical components measured bad. If others are having 5HP19 transmission issues, it may be a good start to check the easily accessible & replaceable electrical components before diving into the nitty gritty of the actual valve body.
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Last edited by SPL15; 06-25-2012 at 10:19 PM.
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Old 06-26-2012, 10:51 AM   #10
jjrichar
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Thanks for the feedback. Like you said, there isn't anything particularly difficult about the valve body rebuild as long as you are methodical about how you do it.

Besides the electrical issues, I don't think there was anything wrong with the valve body. It looked like it was brand new inside. It's not out of a car I own. It's just a transmission that I bought from a place that sells used parts. I bought a cheap engine and transmission just to pull apart and learn as much as I could about them. I suspect that the electrical issues are probably due to an accident or the guys in the shop throwing it around like a football with their forklift.

Also, as you said, it is actually an easy process to test nearly every electrical component without the valve body coming out.

Last edited by jjrichar; 06-26-2012 at 11:08 AM.
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Old 07-24-2013, 10:44 PM   #11
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Great write up. I am trying to locate a source for troubleshooting my electrical connections. I see you mention an ASTG guide. Where could I find this? I have a 2005 Z4 that i believe has the same transmission and I am trying to trouble shoot a solenoid open circuit fault but I can't find a good wiring diagram.
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Old 07-25-2013, 02:27 AM   #12
jjrichar
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Go to the top of this thread and you will see the link to other parts of the project. When you get to that thread, scroll down on the original post and you will see a link in the text that goes to the ATSG guide. This is for the FL transmission, which isn't exactly the same, but should be a good start.

What are the issues you are having? Can I help?
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Old 07-25-2013, 04:58 PM   #13
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I have a 2005 Z4 w 89,000 miles. I just purchased it and it has a transmission problem. Coincident to a battery failure the trans prog light came on and the trans is in failsafe mode. I have done a lot of trolling around the net and it seems that this may be related to the battery issue. Prior to my purchasing the car, it was taken to a tech who pulled the codes and said the faults were P0753 and DME Trans fault 299A. After I bought the car I pulled (and cleared) the following codes several times P0751 and P0750.

Right now I am just trying to test the solenoids for proper resistance so that I can narrow down the possibilities. If they check out then it is on to the harness and then the TCM.
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Old 07-26-2013, 03:17 AM   #14
jjrichar
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With regard to the solenoid testing, an expert on these who works on them all the time told me this test is not perfect. If the resistance is miles off, then it will be your culprit. If the resistance is OK, the solenoid might still be faulty. Unfortunately, I don't know which of the solenoids is designated 'A'. The documentation I've seen refers to them by a different name. However looking on line in other places, it seems that solenoid A is most likely the 1st-2nd shift solenoid, which is EDS3. I'm assuming you found the ASTG document that refers to this solenoid. It's one of the three black ones, and its the one that sits next to the two green solenoids. It's the one closest to the center of the transmission. Look at the first photo in the first post in the thread. It's the one at the 11:30 of the output speed sensor.

If it seems ok I would swap this with another of the same colour. Clear all the codes, then turn the ignition to position 2 (obviously don't start the car), put the car in gear, and see what codes you get. Hopefully the codes will follow the bad solenoid. You might be able to narrow down which of the solenoids it is in this way. Not having done this I don't know if the solenoids will attempt to activate with the turbine speed at zero. If you have the INPA/DIS, you may be able to activate the solenoids using this to identify if it is working or not, and when changing the solenoid to another position, if the fault follows it.

If this doesn't work, you may just have to buy a new solenoid (assuming the wiring is OK), install it and see how it goes.
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Old 07-26-2013, 03:49 AM   #15
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Wow! One of the best right ups ever, nice work
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