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Old 03-10-2012, 08:29 PM   #1
thecarguy
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How are you able to torque Meyle HD front sway bar end links???

They just arrived and have a hex end on the bolt tip and the 16mm nut unlike the stock ones that have the thin 16mm part on the bolt to hold it while you torque down the 16mm nut with a torque wrench. No way of doing that with the Meyle's. What did you all do for snugging it all up? I hate to just muscle it and hope I have it tight enough.

thanks.
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Old 03-10-2012, 11:58 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by thecarguy View Post
They just arrived and have a hex end on the bolt tip and the 16mm nut unlike the stock ones that have the thin 16mm part on the bolt to hold it while you torque down the 16mm nut with a torque wrench. No way of doing that with the Meyle's. What did you all do for snugging it all up? I hate to just muscle it and hope I have it tight enough.

thanks.
Do not bother trying to reach torque spec by using a hex socket to hold the threaded rod from spinning and a torque wrench. Those who designed this embedding of a hex hole onto the threaded rod should be dragged out in the street and shot. It's the crappiest idea ever to think that it is anything more than false hope for the installer and not useful at all. For the endlink design, BMW actually got it right by allowing you to use a thin wrench to hold the rod from spinning. I stripped one of mine after apparently not learning (how crappy the design is) from when I tried to torque down the top nut of the front struts on Bilsteins. They had the same retarded design. I guarantee you that it will strip the inside of the threaded rod hex shape long before you reach torque spec on both the Bilsteins and also the Meyle end links.

If you have an impact wrench, take that to it and be done with it.
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Old 03-11-2012, 10:11 AM   #3
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Do not bother trying to reach torque spec by using a hex socket to hold the threaded rod from spinning and a torque wrench. Those who designed this embedding of a hex hole onto the threaded rod should be dragged out in the street and shot. It's the crappiest idea ever to think that it is anything more than false hope for the installer and not useful at all. For the endlink design, BMW actually got it right by allowing you to use a thin wrench to hold the rod from spinning. I stripped one of mine after apparently not learning (how crappy the design is) from when I tried to torque down the top nut of the front struts on Bilsteins. They had the same retarded design. I guarantee you that it will strip the inside of the threaded rod hex shape long before you reach torque spec on both the Bilsteins and also the Meyle end links.

If you have an impact wrench, take that to it and be done with it.
Unfortunately I don't have an impact gun, but I hear ya. Well, I need to put these on in about an hour...anyone else have an idea that has installed these? How critical is it to torque them or is just a good old fashion snugging down good?
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Old 03-11-2012, 10:24 AM   #4
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Without a counter hold, the joint will start spinning long before the nut is anywhere close to tight enough. You either need to counter hold, use an impact wrench, or return the Meyle before you damage them and get some new OE end links.
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Old 03-11-2012, 10:40 AM   #5
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Without a counter hold, the joint will start spinning long before the nut is anywhere close to tight enough. You either need to counter hold, use an impact wrench, or return the Meyle before you damage them and get some new OE end links.
Correct, but what I was suggesting is that with an allen socket, I would hold it tight while tightening the nut with an open end wrench. Obviously I would have no idea as to when of if I am hitting the torque spec (which I think is 65nm). I am one that always like to be precise though with a torque wrench. Would suck to return them now and drive on bad end links for another week.
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Old 03-11-2012, 10:55 AM   #6
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I think the torque spec is really tight! I forget, but I'm recalling something like 80 ft-lbs

Sounds like you've got to give it a shot with the allen key...maybe add a longer section of pipe onto the allen wrench. If you're using a 1' long breaker bar and weigh 160 lbs, just use half your body weight. I made mine really tight and they've held fine...and I'm kind of small...like smaller than a beer bottle!

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Old 03-11-2012, 11:27 AM   #7
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I think the torque spec is really tight! I forget, but I'm recalling something like 80 ft-lbs

Sounds like you've got to give it a shot with the allen key...maybe add a longer section of pipe onto the allen wrench. If you're using a 1' long breaker bar and weigh 160 lbs, just use half your body weight. I made mine really tight and they've held fine...and I'm kind of small...like smaller than a beer bottle!

HTH
It's funny how it seems the torque specs are all over. I also have seen 50 ft-lbs. Most people are fine not using a torque wrench, I don't know why I have such a hard time not using one.

No one here has actually used the Meyle units? I have found posts were people bought them and love them but no mention of how they tightened them. Those of you that have them please chime in.
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Old 03-11-2012, 11:34 AM   #8
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It will strip well before 30 Nm. Take it from a pro

Just torque down slowly until the nut up against the endlink mount on the strut. I used an open ended wrench on the nut. You can use the hex head socket to keep the threaded rod from spinning. Once it is snug up against the mount on the strut, swiftly try to turn the nut as fast as you can in short small "bursts." Stop when you feel the embedded hex head on the threaded rod starting to strip an call it a day. I am one of the biggest sticklers and OCD with torque specs. If I could deal with this part not being at spec, you should be able to also.

The nut is a one time use lock nut. It shouldn't vibrate anywhere. I've driven over 1k so far on that method and also with one side stripped and its fine. When I do have problems, I'll take those things off and put them in the trash. I will either go back to OEs or some other aftermarket ones with better design and higher grade joints. If I had known of the crappy design, I would have never bought them.
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Old 03-11-2012, 11:42 AM   #9
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Correct, but what I was suggesting is that with an allen socket, I would hold it tight while tightening the nut with an open end wrench. Obviously I would have no idea as to when of if I am hitting the torque spec (which I think is 65nm). I am one that always like to be precise though with a torque wrench. Would suck to return them now and drive on bad end links for another week.
Precise torque spec isn't super critical in this application, just don't grossly over-torque it and break the stud. Otherwise, if you don't get it quite tight enough, you'll quickly notice clunking when going over bumps. In that case, re-tighten until the clunking goes away.
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Old 03-11-2012, 11:55 AM   #10
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Thanks guys, this helps. I will go ahead and give her a go. Question though just so I make sure I have the right tools for the stock removal...I have seen that they are 18mm as opposed to the Meyle 16mm, is this true? I also know that I need to do a thin wrench to hold the bolt end.
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Old 03-11-2012, 12:05 PM   #11
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Thanks guys, this helps. I will go ahead and give her a go. Question though just so I make sure I have the right tools for the stock removal...I have seen that they are 18mm as opposed to the Meyle 16mm, is this true? I also know that I need to do a thin wrench to hold the bolt end.
In removing, thin isn't important since it doesn't matter if you damage the boot or not.

My OE endlinks needed a 16mm, but the new OE lemforder needed a thin 18mm wrench...which I made with an old bmw wrench and bench grinder.

But, with the allen key, you won't need thin for replacing.

Oh, and a tip...

Both wheels need to be on the ground or off the ground together. I learned the hard way, but figured it out.

Easiest is up in the front with wheels off.
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Old 03-11-2012, 12:11 PM   #12
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In removing, thin isn't important since it doesn't matter if you damage the boot or not.

My OE endlinks needed a 16mm, but the new OE lemforder needed a thin 18mm wrench...which I made with an old bmw wrench and bench grinder.

But, with the allen key, you won't need thin for replacing.

Oh, and a tip...

Both wheels need to be on the ground or off the ground together. I learned the hard way, but figured it out.

Easiest is up in the front with wheels off.
Cool, thanks! So 16mm is the stocker and the Meyle. Off to work!
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Old 03-11-2012, 12:13 PM   #13
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Thanks guys, this helps. I will go ahead and give her a go. Question though just so I make sure I have the right tools for the stock removal...I have seen that they are 18mm as opposed to the Meyle 16mm, is this true? I also know that I need to do a thin wrench to hold the bolt end.
Don't remember what OEM sizes were but looking back at my documentation for Meyle end links, it is a 15mm nut and #5 hex. Torque spec is 65 Nm for end links both from links to strut mount bracket and sway bar. You don't technically need a "thin" open ended wrench for taking off the OEs. I used the smallest handle sized one and I had to force it in a bit though.
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Old 03-11-2012, 02:46 PM   #14
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So funny how things work out...put the front end up in the air, wheels off and low and behold the only problem was that the top bolt on the passenger side end link (into the strut) was loose. Torqued it down (yay got to use my torque wrench) and all is good.

Returns always suck but col that i get to send these back and get something that I can actually torque down when it comes time to replace the endlinks. Which I think will be soon as all of the boots are cracked.

Thanks for all the help. Wish I had the time to put the front up with both wheels hanging before I ordered parts but glad it only took me a few minutes as a result.
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Old 03-22-2012, 01:31 PM   #15
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Got it

Okay, I finally figured out how torque it to specs (33 ft-lbs) on mine, safely, with almost no chance of stripping the allen. I am installing new sway bar links on a 1995 Toyota Corolla. The Beck Arnley link (101-4874) uses a 17mm nut and a 5mm allen.

It's a very cumbersome design, yes. To separate one of the original seized OE links from the swaybar, I had to use a sawzall. Luckily, though, since I was replacing my struts as well, I did not have to remove either of the upper link bolts. I just left the old links dangling on the old struts when I pulled the old struts out.

The trick is to not attempt to tighten anything using the allen. Use the allen for steadying the bolt inside the nut ONLY. All of your turning/tightening should be on the nut. The Haynes manual says nothing about how difficult this process can be and I haven't checked the Chilton, but my method works. Originally I tried to torque using an adjustable torque wrench on the allen and it slipped, slightly stripping the interior of the bolt. Furious with how difficult this process had been from start to finish, I decided not to take any more chances with further stripping my new links like I stripped the old ones. I abandoned the method of torquing the allen and I also tossed the adjustable torque wrench to the side and used my trusty bar torque wrench instead.

I put a very small amount of Teflon tape on the end of my 5mm allen to ensure a snugger fit, about 1-2 inches of tape, wrapped tightly. It must be a short allen socket; do not attempt to use a long one. Set your wrench to its "lefty-loosy" setting and insert the tape-wrapped allen socket into the hole. Carefully watch to make sure that some of your Teflon tape gets inside the hole so as to better "grip" the interior, it's a little bit of insurance against looseness/stripping. Some of the tape will bunch up at the end, that's not a problem as long as you get some of it in there. Keep in mind that a 6mm allen is far too large for grasping the interior of this 5mm hole, even after it's been stripped, which of course you are trying to avoid. You MUST use the 5mm allen.

Now, with the allen still inserted, place the open end of a 17mm wrench on the bolt. Tightening is a very tedious process, as you are constantly having to remove the wrench and re-seat it to get quarter turns, but patience is key here. I suppose you could put the closed-end of the wrench over it before inserting the allen, but personally this just creates more activity around the allen and I was tired of doing anything further with the allen except holding it. After a few minutes of making the quarter-turns you will get the nut hand-tight. Tighten it even more, almost until you cannot hand-tighten it anymore. You should be able to do this confidently, with no worry of stripping the allen. You should notice no budging or looseness from the allen end, e.g., there will be no chance of stripping. It is important to get the nut tight because when you torque it in the next step, you do not want the allen to turn with the nut so much that no progress can be made.

Once it's as tightened as far as you can make it by hand, remove everything and seat a shallow 17mm socket on the end of your bar torque wrench. You may need to use an adapter. Clearances were extremely difficult here as the lateral arms got in the way when doing the lower nut, and the brake assembly and wheel well got in the way while doing the upper one, and to top it all off I could not use a deep socket because it just made things stick out too far with the 1/2" to 3/4" adapter on the end of the ft-lb torque wrench (my in-lb torque wrench, which is considerably smaller, unfortunately cannot torque to the equivalent of 33 ft-lbs). But, in the end, the clearances were just barely enough.

Slowly torque. You will not be able to observe the allen hole spinning in the nut because it will be covered up by the wrench, but this isn't important. You will know it is spinning (slightly) because the torque will not creep up to specs the way it normally would. However, if you hand-tightened enough, you will notice that your torque WILL start creeping up with each turn. Just keep slowly tightening it until your torque is reached.

Here is a photo of the tools I used.
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Old 03-22-2012, 06:14 PM   #16
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^for my applications I was using the allen to hold the threaded shaft/rod from spinning. Torquing the nut slowly is what led to stripping the allen head as the force from torquing the nut was greater than the counter force.

That being said, I'd say impact is the way to go since it can spin a nut faster than the shaft will spin. Just more tools to buy

If I ever see any automotive part with this design like this (embedded hex within a threaded rod/shaft), I'll skip it for something else. It would have made more sense for them to make a box cut at the end of the rod so that one can put an open ended or adjustable wrench to use as a counter rather than sorry inverted hex.
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Old 03-22-2012, 10:18 PM   #17
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Don't torque with the allen inserted

How did you torque the nut with the allen wrench inserted? The reason I tried torquing the allen initially (and stripped it subsequently) is because I didn't know how else to do it. There is no way to have my socket torque wrench on the nut at the same time the allen is inserted. Someone mentioned a crowfoot wrench/socket, maybe that is the way to do it, but I didn't have one available.

All my torquing is done with the allen removed. The only time I have the allen inserted is when I am hand tightening. You should not be able to strip the allen by hand tightening. If you can hand-tighten it enough, then you can torque the nut without having to provide any counterweight to the rod (ballstud). The friction from the washer-type flat on the other side, which is actually a flanged-out part of the ballstud, provides sufficient resistance.

Once I got this technique down with the first two, the other two went like a snap.

Quote:
It would have made more sense for them to make a box cut at the end of the rod so that one can put an open ended or adjustable wrench to use as a counter rather than sorry inverted hex.
I agree. That way, you might be able to torque it from the box cut end. On the other hand, I'm not sure if torquing the ballstud means the nut is torqued the same amount. I suppose that's a metallurgical/engineering quesion that I did too poorly in EK101 to answer. If the torques are not the same, then perhaps they figured that stripping the hex and forcing people away from torquing the ballstud was better than the link constantly coming loose and installers unable to figure out why. Or perhaps they wanted to discourage torquing from the ballstud end because doing so tends to screw up the balljoint's internals (earlier, when I was trying to torque the ballstud using the allen, one of my boots actually twisted to the point that it wouldn't pop back... see blurry picture. I had to return it for a new one). At the very least I think there should be more effort from industry to clarify the proper/best technique. Like I said, there was no mention of how to do it in the Haynes manual and the links themselves came with no instructions. The Chilton manual was equally unhelpful in terms of method, but unlike the Haynes, which only says "installation is reverse of removal," the Chilton specifically says to torque the nut. On the other hand, the torque list at the beginning of the Haynes identifies 33 ft-lbs for the "link nut," but the Chilton's torque list only calls it the "stabilizer bar link-to-bar" and "stabilizer bar link-to-nut," which is technically not specific as to whether you torque the allen or the nut. Maddening. But if you had to choose one piece of advice from the manuals to follow, I think it's where Chilton says you should torque the nut.
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Old 05-07-2012, 01:23 PM   #18
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I just installed mine, I tightened the bolts down with an air ratchet (Not impact gun) and they all cinched down except one, the one by the auto level sensor, that one I had to cinch down with allen key/wrench till it was snug, then i torqued them with a torque wrench like normal, and did not encounter any further stud spinning.
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Old 03-23-2013, 12:06 AM   #19
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So I just installed Meyle HD end links. I bought the parts via Autohauz. When I went to install, I noticed the Meyle boxes indicated that each part was manufactured in a different country, one Turkey and one Taiwan (yeah, not Germany).

Anyways, the first side (Turkey) installed as expected, using the 5mm hex to hold with a 15mm open wrench to tighten the nut. When I went to install the second side, I noticed I couldn't fit a hex or torx bit in the end. The one made in Taiwan installed similar to the OEM Lemforder end link, with a thin wrench on the back needed to hold while tightening the 15mm in the front.

I don't know if they're moving to that design, but I thought it was odd and a bit annoying that I got one of each style. Not sure which one was easier to install. They both have their +/- 's.
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Old 03-24-2013, 11:38 AM   #20
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Just wanted to chime in after running with these Meyle end links since over the past year, I have been getting a slight clunk when I turn the steering wheel. If you turn the steering wheel at an average speed or if you turn it swiftly you feel it. As I said, when it gives me problems, I'll take them off and throw them in the trash. I bought some made by TRW and they appear to have the same design and quality as the OE ones and they come with nyloc nuts. It uses a 16mm thin wrench to counter. Glad I will be able to get these on with the right torque spec now
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