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Old 03-05-2013, 11:36 AM   #1
dabears
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Join Date: Jan 2008
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Exclamation dabears advanced nutrition & exercise guide : cutting/bulking/re-composition

dabears Advanced Guide To Nutrition & Exercise

First off before you read anything and get discouraged, I am going to illustrate what I am attempting to achieve with this guide and the multiple benefits you can expect to receive by following it.

This is mostly for the 99% of us. Not the fitness elite, or those with specific goals (especially athletic). Just those looking to get stronger, look better, and be leaner year round.

Also, I will be using some terminology that some may not understand. Feel free to google anything, since education is just as importance as what I'm about to discuss below... dedication. I've done my best to keep it as simple as possible (This is not a simple guide).

This guide is useful for the following dedicated individuals, regardless of experience. Really let that the word "dedicated" sink in. It is defined as the following:

Dedicated : Devoted to a task or purpose; having single-minded loyalty or integrity

This isn't a diet or a quick exercise regime. This is a lifestyle change that you can choose to accept to see immediate & long term benefits. I know majority of people are interested in only the muscle & fat aspect, so I won't list the incredible health benefits you will also achieve by eating wholesome healthy foods. They are just a bonus (and in the long term, more important for longevity and wellness).

This guide is based on and cherry picks ideologies & science from the following:

Paleo/Primal Nutrition - Leangains - Intermittent Fasting - Carb Cycling - Starting Strength/Stronglifts

By following this guide you can hope to achieve the following (depending on your goals) & reap the benefits

- Reduce body fat while minimizing strength loss (Cutting)
- Add strength while minimizing fat gain (Bulking)
- Add strength while cutting fat (Body Re-composition)
- Stay full while cutting fat / eating at a deficit
- Increase in mental focus and concentration
- Stabilize energy levels and mood
- Efficient carbohydrate use
- Workout 3 days a week, no more than 60 minutes a session
- Cardio is completely unnecessary for majority of individuals (from a weight loss standpoint)
- Minimal supplements required
- Eat large, filling meals even on a cut
- Eat foods like rib-eye steaks, salmon, pork, chicken thighs, butter, bacon, sour cream etc.
- Many more that are discussed in detail below

Essentially you can add muscle without getting fat, cut without losing muscle & being constantly hungry, eat as little or as many meals as you choose, and eat a ton of dietary fat without having it add to your waistline. All while working out 3 days a week with simple, efficient exercises.

Your body composition is 70% diet, 30% training. Therefore, the most important part is first... nutrition.

Nutrition Guide

Your diet will determine whether you gain or lose muscle and gain or lose fat. Read this initial setup guide, and then choose a goal from one of "templates".

First Step - Calculate your Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE)

This is the amount of calories you burn on a daily basis, your "maintenance" level for your current weight.

Calculate your BMR (Basal Metabolic Rate) & TDEE

Your BMR is the calories you burn just being alive... if you were in a coma, the doctors would feed you this amount.

Go to this website and enter your stats. Unless you've had a recent caliper test done, do not enter body fat %.

http://1percentedge.com/ifcalc

If you have a desk job, you are Sedentary. If you have a job that involves heavy labour, the light or moderate activity level is more applicable. If you have a desk job but you do cardio type exercises like running / jogging / hiking etc 2-3 times a week, choose lightly active. It is best to underestimate than to overestimate your activity level, hence the "Sedentary" setting for the majority of us.

Your TDEE is crucial for this, so be honest with yourself. Working a desk job and lifting heavy weights 3 times a week with 1-3 minutes rest in between doesn't count as "lightly active". It's best to be conservative.

Training Days vs. Rest Days

Utilizing this nutrition plan, you will have "Training Days" (where you perform heavy compound barbell exercises) and "Rest Days" where you recover from this training. Typically this means 3 training days a week, and 4 rest days. The more you train, the less time you have to rest and recover for the next session. Be efficient.

Hierarchy of importance for this diet (and really any nutrition plan)

1. Calorie intake vs expenditure controls whether you gain or lose weight.
2. The macronutrient composition of your diet (carbs/fats/protein) controls the ratio of how much fat vs muscle is lost/gained.
3. Nutrient timing (intermittent fasting, getting food in after a workout etc). is a distant third

I will now go into detail on what you need to do to see results based on these factors. The guide is structured in this order for a reason... if struggling, focus on the first two factors before worrying about the third. Combining all three together creates a formidable package.

Calorie Requirements

1) Calorie Intake vs. Expenditure

If you eat at a calorie deficit every day, your body needs to make up that deficit from "itself". This comes in the form of fat and muscle tissue (Weight Loss).

If you eat at a calorie surplus every day, your body needs to store the excess energy it doesn't require. This comes in the form of fat and muscle tissue (Weight Gain).

Your calorie intake will change based on whether it is a training day or a rest day, and also based on your goals. Specific targets based on your TDEE are discussed in the goal templates.

Macronutrient Requirements

2) Macronutrient Composition

Eating a diet high in protein supplies the muscles with the protein they require to sustain themselves, when combined with training. You eat high protein on training days to allow your muscles to remain intact and repair with sufficient calories / amino acids.

You should also focus on eating 100g or less of carbs from vegetable sources on rest days. On training days, your heavy lifting creates a need for a higher carbohydrate intake, which means you should eat your servings of rice and/or potatoes on these days. Attempt to keep total carb level to 200g or less. By normalizing your carb intake you are increasing your "insulin sensitivity", which means your body will utilize carbs more effectively on training days (to fuel your workouts & muscle growth, not add to your stomach fat).

Your calorie intake will therefore be made up of the following macronutrients.

Quick refresher... 1g of Protein or Carb = 4 calories, 1g of Fat = 9 Calories

Protein Requirements

Your protein intake will always be high. Specific quantities are discussed in the goal templates.

Carbohydrate & Fat Requirements

On training days, your goal is to fit your carb & protein requirements within your allotted calories. The remaining calories are made up of essential fats from your protein sources and/or cooking sources. On rest days, you are looking to keep your carb intake to 100g or less (essentially salads with oil dressing only, no sugars or starches). Specific quantities are discussed in the goal templates.

What should I eat that will "fit my macros"?

You will need to cook on this plan. Period. Eating out is something that should be done as a treat on occasion, as it is hard to find food that will fit your macros unless you are getting a piece of meat and salad on rest days, or chicken and rice / low fat subway sandwich on training days for example.

If you don't cook the majority of your meals already, this most likely be your biggest hurdle to overcome. On this plan you are only required to have home cooked meals 2-3 times a day depending on your needs; if you cannot do this... stop reading now and save yourself the time. You won't see results eating out.

Grocery List:

Lean Proteins:
Chicken Breast
Turkey Breast
Tuna
Lean Beef Cuts (Round / Loin / 90% Lean Ground Beef etc.)
Ribeye / Strip / Tenderloin etc. Steaks
Whole Eggs
Bacon
Regular Ground Beef
Pork
Egg Whites
Low Fat Milk
Low Fat Yogurt
Whey Protein
Cottage Cheese
Shrimp
Beans
Any other lean protein source such as wild game etc.

Complex Carbohydrates:
Potatoes
Rice
Pasta
Whole Grain Breads
Low Fat Ice Cream
Cereal
Oatmeal (Not Instant)
Pancakes
Popcorn
Any carb source (sugar, starch etc.) that is low in fat.

Fats:
In addition to the fats in the meat you consume...
Olive Oil (Don't cook with, it turns rancid)
Vegetable Oils (Only use to sear meat)
Coconut Oil (actually helps burn body fat)
Bacon Fat
Avocados / Guacamole
Butter
Sour Cream
Cheese
Full Fat Greek Yogurt (Avoid ones high in sugar)
Full Fat Milk

Fibre:
In addition to carb sources:
Leafy Green Vegetables like Spinach/Kale/Romanian Lettuce, Cauliflower, Broccoli, etc.

How will I know I am getting the proper calories / macros?

You have a couple choices.

A) Count Calories/Macros using an App & Scale (My personal recommendation)
1. Get the phone app called myfitnesspal. It is an awesome calorie tracker that has an incredible food database of everything you can think of. Even has the ability to scan bar codes off of packages.

2. Purchase a food scale ($20-$30) so you can weigh things like chicken breasts, steaks, cheese, etc. and be able to track appropriately. It would be a waste of time to track otherwise, since you would have no idea how much you ate. Make sure the scale has a "tare" function so you can place a plate / container on it first, zero the weight, then place food into the container.

3. Utilizing the app & scale, track your food diligently for at least a few weeks, despite how painful it may seem. You'll get used to it, and you will be sure you are meeting your calorie & macro requirements. Once you have tracked a few meals, you'll know what they are for next time without having to count. I've been doing it myself every day for over 8 months now without issue.

B) Count Calories/Macros using the following simplified rules

1. http://rippedbody.jp/2011/10/18/want...ount-calories/

C) Guess and monitor results. The "Wait and see" approach.

1. You are setting yourself up for failure first off, and this is a very inefficient way to find out if what you think you are eating isn't correct. And if/when you see less than ideal results, you will have to make blind adjustments and then take another "wait and see" approach. If you are dedicated, you will try your best to adhere to either of the two options above. I don't recommend guessing whatsoever, unless you have already counted calories & macros in the past and have a solid idea of what everything is around.

Knowing you are meeting your calorie & macronutrient targets with whole foods is the single most important part of this entire process. Don't discount this. You will learn portion control / knowledge that will set you up for a lifetime of success.

How to accurately & easily count homemade recipe calories utilizing myfitnesspal on your phone + a $20 weight scale

I came up with this method, and use it everyday. For the benefit it brings, it is effortless. It applies to essentially any recipe or food that is not in a "piece" format, such as a slice of bacon or an egg.

You need the myfitnesspal app + a food scale that can weigh at least 5 lbs and can tare something on it (remove the weight to 0). My scale was $20 and meets the criteria.

I will use my taco beef recipe for an example. I will also use grams as an example since I'm canadian, but this can be done with any measurement.

Step 1: You must know the portions of the individual items in the recipe... usually it is a can of this, etc. but for meats / packaged things make sure you input the total amount of the package. In this case, the total amount of ground beef. (Usually sold in 1lb packages, it will be labeled).

Step 2: Cook the recipe! Create a new recipe in myfitnesspal and input all the ingredients once finished. Tare a bowl/plate (whatever can fit the recipe) and then place the recipe into the container. Whatever the total weight in grams is, divide by 100. This is the amount of 100g servings the recipe provides.

For my taco beef recipe, I use 2lbs of lean ground beef, 2 jars of black bean and corn salsa, and a package of mushrooms + one medium onion.

Step 3: Tare a plate (or whatever you plan to eat on). Since I'm making a taco, I will prepare a plate with a burrito shell on it + avocado / sour cream first, then tare the entire thing. Scoop the serving amount you want (by utilizing the pre-created recipe you can check to see how much calories a certain amount is before you eat it!).

If you take 150g for instance, that is 1 and half servings. The 100g split provides an easy way to enter servings.

This provides you a tool to pre-plan your meals around your goals, as well as an effective method to ensure your calorie counting is a accurate as possible.

Meal Frequency / Nutrient Timing / Fasting (ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR WHEN ABOVE HAS BEEN MASTERED)

3) Meal Timing & Intermittent Fasting

Nutrient timing is also important, however if you have your calories and macronutrients in check you will see great results. Ensure you are getting a whey protein shake with simple sugars in post workout, and you will be golden. If you want to see even better results read further. Treat this like a bonus... it isn't necessary, but it will help you even more. It is also way more advanced than the previous requirements. If you get discouraged or confused reading it, forget about it for now and just focus on hitting your calorie and macro requirements and perhaps revisit in the future once you are more comfortable with all the change.

Intermittent Fasting & Meal Timing

The name sounds scary... but for most individuals, they are already doing this by skipping breakfast. They eat dinner, go to bed, get up without eating breakfast, have a coffee, and then eat lunch.

How does it work?

Essentially you will not consume anything 16 hours of the day. 8 hours you spend sleeping, the other 8 hours you spend not eating. For the typical average joe who works a desk job 9-5, it is easiest from 8 PM to 12 PM the next day. Choose whatever works for your schedule, I will use the 12 PM to 8 PM feeding window as an example. Black coffee or green tea (no sugar/milk) is recommended to assist in fat burning / hunger control. Once you are used to skipping breakfast and managing your macros... you will become a master of your own hunger. It is a very satisfying feeling, I can tell you first hand. I have fasted for 24 hours with just mild discomfort. You will be very productive during this time as well.

What are the benefits?

- Lack of Hunger While Dieting
- Increase in mental focus and concentration
- More stable energy levels and improved mood
- More fat burned
- Eat larger meals yet still lose fat

How to structure your fasting, training and eating windows

You have a few choices depending on your lifestyle. This is borrowed from leangains.com and written by Martin Berkhan.

Fasted training

Training is initiated on an empty stomach and after ingestion of 10 g BCAA or similar amino acid mixture. This "pre-workout" meal is not counted towards the feeding phase. Technically, training is not completely fasted - that would be detrimental. The pre-workout protein intake, with its stimulatory effect on protein synthesis and metabolism, is a crucial compromise to optimize results. The 8-hour feeding phase starts with the post-workout meal.

Sample setup

11.30-12 PM or 5-15 minutes pre-workout: 10 g BCAA
12-1 PM: Training
1 PM: Post-workout meal (largest meal of the day).
4 PM: Second meal.
9 PM: Last meal before the fast.

Calories and carbs are tapered down throughout the day in the example above.


Early morning fasted training

Here's a sample setup for an individual that trains early in the morning and prefers the feeding phase at noon or later.

6 AM: 5-15 minutes pre-workout: 10 g BCAA.
6-7 AM: Training.
8 AM: 10 g BCAA.
10 AM: 10 g BCAA
12-1 PM: The "real" post-workout meal (largest meal of the day). Start of the 8 hour feeding-window.
8-9 PM: Last meal before the fast.

For the sake of conveniency, I recommend getting BCAA in the form of powder and not tabs. Simply mix 30 g of BCAA powder in a shake and drink one third of it every other hour starting 5-15 minutes pre-workout. Tabs are cheaper, but much more of a hassle (you're going to have to pop a lot of tabs).

One pre-workout meal

This is the most common setup for individuals that are still in college or have flexible working hours.

Sample setup

12-1 PM or around lunch/noon: Pre-workout meal. Approximately 20-25% of daily total calorie intake.
3-4 PM: Training should happen a few hours after the pre-workout meal.
4-5 PM: Post-workout meal (largest meal).
8-9 PM: Last meal before the fast.


Two pre-workout meals

This is the usual protocol for people with normal working hours.

Sample setup

12-1 PM or around lunch/noon: Meal one. Approximately 20-25% of daily total calorie intake.
4-5 PM: Pre-workout meal. Roughly equal to the first meal.
8-9 PM: Post-workout meal (largest meal).

So choose one that best fits your lifestyle, and eat your meals (as outlined in the calorie / macronutrient portions of the guide) appropriately within the recommended time guidelines.

By fasting (and without getting into too much detail) you are maximizing fat burning in the latter stages of the fast, and maximizing nutrient uptake to where you want it to go (and minimizing where you don't). Hence why it is a "bonus".

Questions? Reply in this thread, or ask in your progress thread!

Now, depending on your goals (read the descriptions) choose a template that makes sense to you.
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Old 03-05-2013, 11:38 AM   #2
dabears
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Posts: 223
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Body Re-Composition

Body Re-Composition (Add Muscle, Lose Fat)

Ideal for those new to heavy barbell weightlifting with high levels of body fat (20%+).


So you want to add muscle and lose fat? You and everyone else. Luckily since you are new to heavy & intense weightlifting, and are carrying way more fat than you need, you are actually able to achieve the holy grail of fitness. However it will be slower than the typical bulk/cut cycles and you won't be able to use the scale much to measure change. The mirror will be your guide, and you will have to show dedication and perseverance until you start to see noticeable change... at least 12 weeks. That being said... here we go.

You should start a progress thread on the forum, complete with a few pictures of your current physique and your height, weight and age stats. Forum members can help you in your journey and keep you motivated. You will never achieve your goals if you aren't consistent, no matter what diet & exercise plan you are doing.

Calorie Requirements

A training day (3 days/week) will be your TDEE calories + 20%. A rest day (4 days/week) will be your TDEE calories - 20%. Essentially you are looking to gain muscle on your training days with a surplus of calories over your TDEE, and burn fat / recover on your rest days with a calorie deficit.
I will use myself as an example, a 24 year old 6'0 male weighing 178 lbs. My TDEE is 2200 calories. A training day would require 2650 calories, and a rest day would require 1765 calories.

Macronutrient Requirements

Quick refresher... 1g of Protein or Carb = 4 calories, 1g of Fat = 9 Calories

A quick way to determine your macros is to use this calculator : http://1percentedge.com/ifcalc

Continue to the next page after you've calculated your TDEE, and choose "Standard Re-comp", use a custom level for Protein (1g x bodyweight on rest days, 1.5x bodyweight on training days). Choose a 25/75 & 75/25 Carb / Fat Split, and then set your workouts per week (default of 3). The pie charts will show your macronutrient & calorie goals for both your rest days and training days. Continue reading for more detail.

Protein Requirements

On training days, your goal is to eat 1.5 times your bodyweight in grams of protein. On rest days, it is 1 times your bodyweight in grams of protein. At a very minimum, you need to consume 0.82g per pound of bodyweight. So a 178lb individual would consume 267g of protein on a workout day, and 178g of protein on a rest day ideally. Making up the difference can be as simple as adding a whey protein shake post workout.

Carbohydrate & Fat Requirements

On training days, you want to emphasize carbs over fat, as your body utilizes them for muscle building / repair. Using the 150-200g benchmark as an ideal intake & your protein requirements, the tool will tell you your ideal fat intake.

Think of carbs on training days & fat on rest days as your "filler" macros... they make up the remaining calories once you've hit your protein goals.

That is it for the nutrition portion.
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Old 03-05-2013, 11:38 AM   #3
dabears
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Cutting Body Fat (Keep Muscle, Lose Fat)

Ideal for those who have built up muscle mass and would like to cut body fat down. (Especially after a typical bulk for instance). Also useful for those individuals who are above 15% body fat yet have at least 1 year training experience who would like to cut down to below 15% while retaining their muscle mass. It is also possible to see strength gains, even when cutting on this.

Calorie Requirements

A training day (3 days/week) will equal your TDEE calories + 10%. A rest day (4 days/week) will be your TDEE calories - 30%. Essentially you are looking to retain muscle on your training days by eating slightly above your maintenance level (and avoiding any fat gain), and burn fat / recover on your rest days with a calorie deficit.
I will use myself as an example, a 24 year old 6'0 male weighing 178 lbs. My TDEE is 2200 calories. A training day would require 2400 calories, and a rest day would require 1550 calories.

Macronutrient Requirements

Those calories will be made up of the following macronutrients.

Remember... 1g of Protein or Carb = 4 calories, 1g of Fat = 9 Calories

A quick way to determine your macros is to use this calculator : http://1percentedge.com/ifcalc

Continue to the next page after you've calculated your TDEE, and choose "Custom", use a custom level for Protein (1g x bodyweight on rest days, 1.5x bodyweight on training days). Choose a 25/75 & 75/25 Carb / Fat Split, and then set your workouts per week (default of 3). Set your rest days to -30%, and your training days to +10%. The pie charts will show your macronutrient & calorie goals for both your rest days and training days. Continue reading for more detail.

Protein Requirements

On training days, your goal is to eat 1.5 times your bodyweight in grams of protein. On rest days, it is 1 times your bodyweight in grams of protein. At minimum you should have an intake of 0.82g's per lb of bodyweight (or lean body mass for overweight individuals). So a 178lb individual would consume 267g of protein on a workout day, and 178g of protein on a rest day. Making up the difference can be as simple as adding a whey protein shake post workout.

Carbohydrate & Fat Requirements

On training days, you want to emphasize carbs over fat, as your body utilizes them for muscle building / repair. Using the 150-200g benchmark as an ideal intake & your protein requirements, the tool will tell you your ideal fat intake.

Think of carbs on training days & fat on rest days as your "filler" macros... they make up the remaining calories once you've hit your protein goals.

That's it for the nutrition portion.
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Old 03-05-2013, 11:39 AM   #4
dabears
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Bulking Up (Add Muscle, Minimize Fat Gain)

Ideal for those who are 15% body fat or less that are looking to add muscle without the fat gain a typical bulk cycle will provide.

Calorie Requirements

A training day (3 days/week) will be your TDEE calories + 40%. A rest day (4 days/week) will be your TDEE calories - 10%. Essentially you are looking to gain muscle on your training days by eating well above your maintenance level, and burn fat / recover on your rest days with a slight calorie deficit.
I will use myself as an example, a 24 year old 6'0 male weighing 178 lbs. My TDEE is 2200 calories. A training day would require 3100 calories, and a rest day would require 2000 calories.

Macronutrient Requirements

Those calories will be made up of the following macronutrients.

Remember... 1g of Protein or Carb = 4 calories, 1g of Fat = 9 Calories

A quick way to determine your macros is to use this calculator : http://1percentedge.com/ifcalc

Continue to the next page after you've calculated your TDEE, and choose "Custom", use a custom level for Protein (1g x bodyweight on rest days, 1.5x bodyweight on training days). Choose a 25/75 & 75/25 Carb / Fat Split, and then set your workouts per week (default of 3). Set your rest days to -10%, and your training days to +40%. The pie charts will show your macronutrient & calorie goals for both your rest days and training days. Continue reading for more detail.

Protein Requirements

On training days, your goal is to eat 1.5 times your bodyweight in grams of protein. On rest days, it is 1 times your bodyweight in grams of protein. So a 178lb individual would consume 267g of protein on a workout day, and 178g of protein on a rest day. Making up the difference can be as simple as adding a whey protein shake post workout.

Carbohydrate & Fat Requirements

On training days, you want to emphasize carbs over fat, as your body utilizes them for muscle building / repair. Using the 150-200g benchmark as an ideal intake & your protein requirements, the tool will tell you your ideal fat intake.

Think of carbs on training days & fat on rest days as your "filler" macros... they make up the remaining calories once you've hit your protein goals.
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Old 03-05-2013, 11:40 AM   #5
dabears
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The Workout Guide

First: A disclaimer. The following workout is my own, in reality you can use WHATEVER workout that suits you best. The only requirements is that you are squatting and deadlifting, and have enough volume so that you feel ďwastedĒ at the end of the workout. This means you depleted your muscles of their carb stores, and your high carb intake will be used to replenish muscle glycogen (carbs) and not turn to body fat. However, you most likely will not achieve this without heavy barbell movements.

Starting Strength (Beginners) and Stronglifts (Intermediate) are also great choices. Feel free to google those routines.
This workout is based on this idealogy called "Reverse Pyramid". Essentially, you start off with the heaviest weight you plan on using for that exercise, and then each consecutive set you remove roughly 10% of the total weight. This should allow you to perform the previous reps + one additional rep.

Here's how it stacks up. You can do this any day of the week, but you'll be sore... so thatís why I recommend Mon/Wed/Fri. Having a day between workouts helps you recover, and you want to do Workout 1 and Workout 3 as far apart as possible, since you'll be sore and performance could suffer.

If you have never done barbell lifts before, youíll need to watch countless form videos and practice with light weights before you attempt to go heavy, otherwise you will just injure yourself and be unable to work out.

Warm-ups are incredibly important. You are going max effort right off the bat, so you need to warm up your central nervous system. The only thing that will do this is lifting (5 mins on a treadmill isnít effective enough)

You'll want to take around 3 minutes rest between sets on the initial exercise, and then two minutes on the supplementary ones. If you need more, that is ok. It means you are working hard. We arenít here to burn calories, our diet achieves that. We are here to beat up our muscles.

Some may not agree with this style of workout, that is ok. This guide is more meant for the nutrition side, and this workout is just a bonus. At the end of the day whatever fits your lifestyle the best is what you should go with (excluding laying on the couch snacking).

Workout Day 1 (Monday by Default)

Barbell Back Squats

Warmups:

Foam Roller (crucial)
5-6 reps of 40% of your 1 Rep Max
5-6 reps of 60% of your 1 Rep Max

Worksets:

Set 1: Pick a weight you can do 5 reps with, and would fail on the 6th rep. This will most likely be trial and error, make sure you have a workout log.
Set 2: Remove 10% of above weight, go for 6 reps
Set 3: Remove 10% of above weight, go for 7 reps
Set 4: Remove 10% of above weight, go for 8 reps

The 10% is a rough estimate, round up or down.

Here is an example from my own experiences:
Foam Rolled for 5 minutes
Goblet squat stretched for a minute
5 reps of 135 lbs
5 reps of 165 lbs

Then my worksets:
250lbs x 5
225lbs x 6
205lbs x 7
185lbs x 8

Romanian Deadlifts (Straight legged deadlifts)

Worksets:

Set 1: Pick a weight you can do 10 reps with and get a good stretch in the hamstrings.
Set 2: Same weight, 10 reps
Set 3: Same weight, 10 reps

Standing Calf Raises

Worksets:

Set 1: Pick a weight you can do 15 reps with
Set 2: Same weight, 15 reps
Set 3: Same weight, 15 reps

Workout Day 2 (Wednesday by Default)

Bench Press

Warmups:

5-6 slow reps with just the bar. Get your form tight, pretend the bar is stacked with weight
5-6 reps of 40% of your 1 Rep Max
5-6 reps of 60% of your 1 Rep Max

Worksets:

Set 1: Pick a weight you can do 5 reps with, and would fail on the 6th rep.
Set 2: Remove 10% of above weight, go for 6 reps
Set 3: Remove 10% of above weight, go for 7 reps

Incline Dumbbell Press

Worksets:

Set 1: Pick a weight you can do 8 reps with and fail on 9th
Set 2: Same weight, go for 8 reps, hope for 7-8
Set 3: Same weight, go for 7 reps, hope for 6-7

Pushups (Bodyweight)

Tyson 15 Style

So for these, itís like a "finisher" for your chest. You are done when you collapse. And you will.
Get a mat, and place it near a wall. Get down, do a proper full pushup (Chest and nose to floor). Get back up, walk to the wall and touch it. Go back, get back down, do two pushups.

Itís called "Tyson 15" because the goal is to do 15 rounds of this. If you are able to complete 15 rounds, thatís 120 pushups with very minimal rest (just the couple seconds to get up and touch a wall).
I can get to around middle of 11th round fresh... but after the above exercises I collapse in the beginning of round 8. So essentially, keep going until you cannot do anymore pushups without cheating / collapsing. Then you can go home

Workout Day 3 (Friday by Default)

Deadlifts

Warmups:

Foam Roller (crucial)
5-6 reps of 40% of your 1 Rep Max
4-5 reps of 60% of your 1 Rep Max
1-2 reps of 70-80% of your 1 Rep Max (Don't fatigue yourself)

Worksets:

Set 1: Pick a weight you can do 5 reps with, and would fail on the 6th rep.
Set 2: Remove 10% of above weight, go for 6 reps

You should be completely drained and exhausted after this. If you need more than 3 minutes between sets, go for it. More advanced trainees may require additional sets.

Here is an example from my last workout:
Foam Rolled for 5 minutes
5 reps of 185 lbs
4 reps of 225 lbs
2 reps of 275 lbs

300lbs x 5
275lbs x 6

Overhead Press

Worksets:
Set 1: Pick a weight you can do 5 reps with, and would fail on the 6th rep.
Set 2: Remove 10% of above weight, go for 6 reps
Set 3: Remove 10% of above weight, go for 7 reps

Chin-ups (Palms Facing Towards You, Shoulder Width Apart)

Worksets:

Set 1: 8 reps
Set 2: 8 reps
Set 3: 8 reps

If this is easy, go for more reps. Eventually you need to get a weight belt / vest so you can do them weighted. Reverse pyramid technique would then apply.

Pendlay Rows (Similar to bent over barbell rows, but you row from ground -> chest)

Worksets:

Set 1: Pick a weight you can do 8 reps with and fail on 9th
Set 2: Same weight, go for 8 reps, hope for 7-8
Set 3: Same weight, go for 7 reps, hope for 6-7
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Old 03-05-2013, 11:40 AM   #6
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Summary

That is the meat and potatoes of the setup. If you understood all of that... great. If not, feel free to post questions etc. I am willing to explain in more detail / help.

Random Thoughts & Tips

Skeptical on meal timing / fasting? Give this a read

http://www.leangains.com/2010/10/top...-debunked.html

Skeptical on workout? Give this a read

http://www.leangains.com/2011/09/****arounditis.html

If you follow this 80-90% of the time diligently, you will see fantastic results. Don't beat yourself up for a "cheat" here and there, as long as it isn't more than once or twice a week it won't matter.

Meal frequency is irrelevant. Eat one huge meal, two large meals, three medium meals, four smaller meals... whatever works for you and still fits your macros.

For very detailed info on why this method is effective give this a read:

http://rippedbody.jp/2012/03/02/why-...-so-effective/

Thanks for checking this out!
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Old 03-05-2013, 11:44 AM   #7
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Fibrous Veggies


Alfalfa Sprouts
Artichoke Hearts
Arugula
Asparagus
Avocado
Bamboo Shoots
Bean Sprouts
Beet Greens
Bock Choy
Broccoli
Brussel Sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Celery
Celery Root
Chard
Chicory
Chives
Collard Greens
Cucumber
Dandelion Greens
Eggplant
Endive
Escarole
Fennel
Hearts of Palm
Jicama
Kale
Kohlrabi
Leeks
Lettuce
Mache
Millie lettuce
Mushrooms
Okra
Olives
Onion
Parsley
Peppers
Radicchio
Radishes
Rhubard
Sauerkraut
Scallions
Snow Pea Pods
Sorrel
Spinach
String beans
Summer Squash
Tomato
Water Chestnuts
wax beans
Zucchini
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Old 03-05-2013, 11:47 AM   #8
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This is probably an amazing thread that I will read throughout the day. Thanks dude
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Old 03-05-2013, 11:48 AM   #9
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Dayum. Sticky worthy?

Will read later, as I ignore phone calls from customers.
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:06 PM   #10
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There will hopefully be lots of discussion, I wanted to keep it as simple as possible (this is anything but). Sort of create a framework for reference and then tweak to individuals in their respective progress threads if they choose to follow this. My slow bulk has been incredibly successful, and I will Guinea pig a cut starting April 1st as well.
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:19 PM   #11
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sub'd. Excellent write-up man! Cheers!
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:22 PM   #12
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Holy hell, awesome thread.
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:42 PM   #13
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Very good write up. But it just seems so complicated to me.
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:54 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by jmcdolej View Post
Very good write up. But it just seems so complicated to me.
It is complicated at first, I know first hand. I didn't want to make it overly simple, it requires attention to detail especially in the beginning.

Essentially, you need to learn the basics (what this thread presents) and then through trial and error as well as help I can provide along the way figure out what fits your lifestyle, everyone is different.

For example, I had a training day yesterday. At noon bought a double chicken breast low fat subway 12" and 6" sandwich for lunch (first meal of day). Weight trained at 5, then had two scoops of whey protein with 1.5 cups of chocolate almond milk. An hour later, I had three tacos with lean beef, beans etc and rice... Also a salad with balsamic vinegar.

It was 3500 calories, with 270g protein, 386g carbs and 100g fat. I ate too much fat and calories (goal is 50g fat and 3000 calories), but that's life. What matters is that I was in the ballpark macro and calorie wise, I fasted successfully for 16 hours, and I got the majority of my calories post workout.

I have a ton of recipes I use to match the days... I used the same taco beef from last night, ditched the rice and fajita wraps, and instead mixed in cheese sour cream and guacamole. Creativity goes a long way in keeping sane while still easily adhering to diet!
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Old 03-05-2013, 01:06 PM   #15
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Great post. Just curious though, would it kill me to add some Biceps/Triceps in this mix?
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Old 03-05-2013, 01:12 PM   #16
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No, any added volume won't kill you especially isolation. If you are able to do it (I hate being in the gym longer than an hour, busy schedule) then it's no issue. Especially on a bulk.

But every muscle group is getting hit with this routine in my opinion, at least well enough for the majority of lifters. Chin-ups will build strong biceps, heavy bench and push-ups for triceps. Squats Deadlifts etc for the core.
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Old 03-05-2013, 01:28 PM   #17
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What makes you say ss is beginner and SL is intermediate? If anything id think the opposite.
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Old 03-05-2013, 01:32 PM   #18
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Stickied per my previous discussion with dabears. In agreement, no more novels in threads. Refer n00bs to this thread.

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Old 03-05-2013, 01:40 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by DylloS View Post
What makes you say ss is beginner and SL is intermediate? If anything id think the opposite.
I was referring to the typical "novice" routine, which is less volume than SL with pretty much same lifts, figured it was more beginner friendly.
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Old 03-05-2013, 01:41 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by M3Inline6 View Post
Stickied per my previous discussion with dabears. In agreement, no more novels in threads. Refer n00bs to this thread.
Thanks, I'm going to keep working in it as well, adding a FAQ etc and tweaking the wording / adding explanations to reduce confusion and increase the ease of adopting and sticking with it
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