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Old 08-19-2019, 02:45 PM   #21
///Mark_D
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I hope that before you top coated over the POR-15 you scuffed it up really well or used the special POR primer on top of the POR-15. If you top coat directly over that shiny POR finish your paint will peel right off.

The only other option is to dust on a very light coat of top coat onto the POR while it is tacky to create a surface for the top coat to stick to. Once everything cures then you can follow up with a few more light top coats.

I've used POR-15 for surface rust repairs and it is awesome stuff but it takes some extra work to get paint to stick to it properly.
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Old 08-19-2019, 02:59 PM   #22
phug
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Originally Posted by petro240 View Post
Ah, very nice!

Following because I have a spare subframe, control arms, trailing arms, and a box full of bushings in my basement waiting to do the same thing! Just curious if you're planning on using the specific tools to press in the new bushings or if you can just use a shop press since it's out of the car? I'm hoping to be able to do the latter.

I do not have any special tools just that good old Harbor Freight has available. I was going to try my shop press for the upper rear control arm bushing due to the amount of corrosion I see on that bushing.

I believe the bushing has a metal casing similar to the ones on the subframe. Worst case I need to push what I can out of it and use the reciprocating saw once again to carefully cut it out if unsuccessful in my first attempt. I'll try to keep taking pics of the progress.
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Old 08-19-2019, 03:19 PM   #23
phug
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Originally Posted by ///Mark_D View Post
I hope that before you top coated over the POR-15 you scuffed it up really well or used the special POR primer on top of the POR-15. If you top coat directly over that shiny POR finish your paint will peel right off.

The only other option is to dust on a very light coat of top coat onto the POR while it is tacky to create a surface for the top coat to stick to. Once everything cures then you can follow up with a few more light top coats.

I've used POR-15 for surface rust repairs and it is awesome stuff but it takes some extra work to get paint to stick to it properly.
Thanks for the tip! I, unfortunately, did not scuff it so I'll live with it as the subframe will be underneath and not exposed to the UV sunlight I think I should be OK based on other postings. I plan to get this subframe and underside back in the car this week.

Last edited by phug; 08-19-2019 at 03:21 PM.
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Old 08-20-2019, 08:29 PM   #24
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2000 Touring Wagon Small Underside Restoration

Final rust preventative - spray wax!

Just finished prepping the underside, brake lines, and recent plate reinforcement welding with this wax before reinstalling the gas tank and charcoal canister back in.

This wax STINKS!!!! I mean it smells really bad (like bad stinky cheese)! It’s supposed to work great.

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Last edited by phug; 08-20-2019 at 08:31 PM.
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Old 08-21-2019, 09:55 AM   #25
markseven
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Originally Posted by phug View Post
Here's what I did to repair my rear axle subframe through-bolt receiver mount that literally pulled away from the three spot welds holding the top of the mount and through the undercarriage floor.

First, we all know by now that BMW had a design flaw in the welds/sheet metal thickness/etc. where the rear axle carrier that holds the differential is bolted up to the vehicle frame. In my case, the rear driver side through-bolt receiving mount for the RAC that is sandwiched in between two layers of sheet metal failed by torque applied to that mount (as seen by my pics). The other mount points visually look ok with some minor exceptions for hairline cracks or some broken(rusted) spot welds.
This undertaking is not for the faint of heart. Great job, dude!

Was rust a contributor to the failed rear-driver-side mount?
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Old 08-21-2019, 10:16 AM   #26
kensic
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dang it will ride like it was brand new all the new again!
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Old 08-21-2019, 05:58 PM   #27
phug
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Originally Posted by markseven View Post
This undertaking is not for the faint of heart. Great job, dude!



Was rust a contributor to the failed rear-driver-side mount?


Thanks! Although I knew what I was about to embark, it took longer than I planned to complete mostly due to my lack of welding experience. I needed some pro welding experience for the main support welding. However, once that was completed I started to weld the reinforcement plates myself as they are only peripherally providing additional support.

Rust in my opinion didn’t fully contribute to the failure of the threaded mount to pull through the panel. My model year is a 2000 which to my knowledge nothing was changed as far as engineering improvements to address the failures at least from the three spot welds that held the mount in place. I believe the shear force of the differential carrier on that one point just pulled through the metal as the pics show.

The rust and rubbing that visible on the inside vertical side where the mount sits was caused by the movement of a freed mount. The clunking noise known for this failure was audible for some time and I couldn’t hold off making this fix.

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Old 08-21-2019, 06:01 PM   #28
phug
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Originally Posted by kensic View Post
dang it will ride like it was brand new all the new again!


Yes, that plus knowing this is structurally sound I hope brings this ride back to a ‘new’ ride feel. Can’t wait to get it back on the road.



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Old 08-22-2019, 12:51 PM   #29
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This is great. I think you can safely remove the word "small" from the thread title.
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Old 08-22-2019, 08:23 PM   #30
phug
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This is great. I think you can safely remove the word "small" from the thread title.


Thanks, bit you just may be right. My plan was about a month plus and its taken most of the summer. Now I haven’t been diligently spending all available extra hours on it but it’s definitely a large estimate based on my lack of welding experience for sure.


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Old 08-22-2019, 08:29 PM   #31
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Got a shipment of bushings and other things for the rear axle carrier and it took most of the day to get them installed using a HF bearing press tool kit and some hardened bolts, washers and nuts. Not to mention my HF Earthquake air impact.


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Old 08-22-2019, 08:36 PM   #32
phug
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2000 Touring Wagon Small Underside Restoration

I found a replacement part for the gas filler hose that sits in between the fuel filler neck and the gas tank.

Take a Gates 24710 Fuel Filler Hose that is a 15-25 degree fuel filler hose for about $14 vs the BMW p/n 16117176011 that is priced between $30-50 depending where you look and just measure the size you need approx 170-175mm and cut it. Fits perfectly.


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Old 09-10-2019, 08:58 AM   #33
phug
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Open question on an inexpensive way to attack removal and installation of all replaceable bushings and bearlings in the E46 rear trailing arms. BTW - mine have some rust that I'm battling.

I see that the recommended BMW tool is CTA Tools 8920 - https://www.amazon.com/CTA-Tools-892.../dp/B00VX0SXSC but that's like $170 just for the tool.

Has anyone successfully used the $45ish version of a heavy-duty ball joint press to get at the upper/lower control arm and trailing arm bushings as well as the rear wheel bearing? If so, do you have any tips or a link to some steps.

Thx

Last edited by phug; 09-10-2019 at 09:00 AM.
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Old 09-10-2019, 09:18 AM   #34
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Guys on here rent the tools for pretty reasonable amounts. Makes the job much easier. Check here: https://forum.e46fanatics.com/forumdisplay.php?f=122
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Old 09-11-2019, 07:27 AM   #35
phug
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Originally Posted by ronburgundy++ View Post
Guys on here rent the tools for pretty reasonable amounts. Makes the job much easier. Check here: https://forum.e46fanatics.com/forumdisplay.php?f=122


Thanks for the info! I might have to use the proper tool in order to save myself from doing some ‘driveway engineering’ to get these bushings out.

I’m also looking to get the wheel bearings out of these rusted trailing arms. Any suggestions for that tool or an equivalent solution using a shop press?

Thx



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Old 09-11-2019, 04:10 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by phug View Post
Thanks for the info! I might have to use the proper tool in order to save myself from doing some ‘driveway engineering’ to get these bushings out.

I’m also looking to get the wheel bearings out of these rusted trailing arms. Any suggestions for that tool or an equivalent solution using a shop press?

Thx
Your small underside restoration has really progressed well. I would really like to know what you consider a "large" project!

Regarding the bearings....Harbor Freight has bearing tool set they call "front wheel bearing adapters" which is a near clone of the more expensive OTC 6575 Hub Grappler Kit.

https://www.harborfreight.com/front-...ers-63728.html

https://www.amazon.com/OTC-6575-Hub-.../dp/B004ZG69D2

The issues reported with the HF kit mostly revolve around the threaded rod stripping under extreme pressure - which you will get when trying to remove a crusty wheel bearing. If you can overcome the threaded rod issue it might work for you.

Otherwise it might be worthwhile to take the arms off and find a local mechanic or machine shop with a press and some experience to help.

AND...don't forget to remove the large circlip on the outer bearing race or you will practice the use of many four letter words.


MJ
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Old 09-13-2019, 11:44 AM   #37
phug
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Originally Posted by mjweimer View Post
Your small underside restoration has really progressed well. I would really like to know what you consider a "large" project!



Regarding the bearings....Harbor Freight has bearing tool set they call "front wheel bearing adapters" which is a near clone of the more expensive OTC 6575 Hub Grappler Kit.



https://www.harborfreight.com/front-...ers-63728.html



https://www.amazon.com/OTC-6575-Hub-.../dp/B004ZG69D2



The issues reported with the HF kit mostly revolve around the threaded rod stripping under extreme pressure - which you will get when trying to remove a crusty wheel bearing. If you can overcome the threaded rod issue it might work for you.



Otherwise it might be worthwhile to take the arms off and find a local mechanic or machine shop with a press and some experience to help.



AND...don't forget to remove the large circlip on the outer bearing race or you will practice the use of many four letter words.





MJ


Thx! I got a heavy duty ball joint press kit and going to give it a shot this weekend. Worst case I rent the proper tool for my trailing arm bushings.

As for the wheel bearings I have a 12 ton press it’s the awkward leverage or lack of support to hold the arm in place while I try to press out the bearing that my issue.

First things first, let me get the bushings out and I’ll see if the wheel bearings want to cooperate.

Thx
-PH


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Old 09-17-2019, 11:57 AM   #38
phug
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Originally Posted by phug View Post
Thx! I got a heavy duty ball joint press kit and going to give it a shot this weekend. Worst case I rent the proper tool for my trailing arm bushings.

As for the wheel bearings I have a 12 ton press it’s the awkward leverage or lack of support to hold the arm in place while I try to press out the bearing that my issue.

First things first, let me get the bushings out and I’ll see if the wheel bearings want to cooperate.

Thx
-PH


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Success using the $45 ball joint kit! after a day or of trial and error using the tools at my disposal. In hindsight, getting the right tool and being done in a 1/2hour might be worth the delay in shipping the rented tool. Unfortunately, I needed to get this done and move on to another part of the project.

As for my steps, using a combination of 32mm socket to push the upper & lower bearings into a 46mm socket as the receiver cup and the arbor from the kit worked well. You'll need to bend the dust shield some to get a good trajectory to push the bearing out.

In addition, I was able to get the wheel bearing out using my 12-ton shop press. I had to use a couple of layers of 2x4 strips of wood plus the cast-iron plates from the press sitting on top of the wood stack to provide the space needed for the wheel hub to travel as I pressed it out from the back of the wheel bearing/trailing arm towards the outside of the arm.

Once that popped out (with half of the inner race stuck to the wheel hub), I removed the retaining clip from the outer wheel bearing then continued to press the other half of the bearing that was left in the trailing arm using a diameter socket that fits over the remaining inner race.

Now your dush shield may get a bit mangled so if you're like me and want things to be in the original condition as much as possible you might want to get a new set of shields. They get a bit of rust up here in the northeast.
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Old 09-18-2019, 01:23 PM   #39
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Success using the $45 ball joint kit! after a day or of trial and error using the tools at my disposal. In hindsight, getting the right tool and being done in a 1/2hour might be worth the delay in shipping the rented tool. Unfortunately, I needed to get this done and move on to another part of the project.



As for my steps, using a combination of 32mm socket to push the upper & lower bearings into a 46mm socket as the receiver cup and the arbor from the kit worked well. You'll need to bend the dust shield some to get a good trajectory to push the bearing out.



In addition, I was able to get the wheel bearing out using my 12-ton shop press. I had to use a couple of layers of 2x4 strips of wood plus the cast-iron plates from the press sitting on top of the wood stack to provide the space needed for the wheel hub to travel as I pressed it out from the back of the wheel bearing/trailing arm towards the outside of the arm.



Once that popped out (with half of the inner race stuck to the wheel hub), I removed the retaining clip from the outer wheel bearing then continued to press the other half of the bearing that was left in the trailing arm using a diameter socket that fits over the remaining inner race.



Now your dush shield may get a bit mangled so if you're like me and want things to be in the original condition as much as possible you might want to get a new set of shields. They get a bit of rust up here in the northeast.


Sharing my selection of tools to complete this job.

NOTE: This is being provided as informative content for your reading pleasure and not prescriptive. Follow at your own risk. Be smart and wear protective glasses, gloves, etc. when operating any tools especially a shop press and air tools.


First let me say I had the trailing arms removed from the car while doing an underside restoration which made access easier.


To remove the rear wheel hubs and bearings:

For my press setup I ended up using six (6) 2x4s about a foot in length - three on each side of the trailing arm along with the metal plates that came with the press.

Fit the metal plates on top of the wood stacks and in-between the wheel hub flange and the dust shield if they don’t fit just snug them up to the edge of the wheel hub flange so the whole wheel hub can drop when pushed out from the back with the press.

Use the two upper and lower bushings ‘lollipop’ support brackets as they are opposite each other as your contact support points for the trailing arm in your press.

You’re going to wrestle with the arm and the metal plates as you wedge all the items above so the trailing arm is well supported and the wood stacks and metal plates have enough support to hold the weight of the arm and you can just hold it with one hand.

With you trailing arm in-place (face down between the stacks) use a 30mm socket that covers the rear of the wheel hub and press it out. More than likely you’ll press 1/2 of the inner bearing race with the hub. So have a replacement hub or the tools to remove that 1/2 from the hub.

Next, to remove the rest if the wheel bearing you first need to remove the retaining ring from the front side. Then place the arm back into place and press the rest of the bearing out using approx. 1 3/4in socket.

To remove the upper and lower bushings:

Using a 32mm socket to push the bushing and a 46mm socket to receive it place it in the ball joint press kit clamp. Spray some WD40 as thread lube and using an air gun or manually with a ratchet (would take forever and some extended leverage) press out the bushings. I did two in 10min using the setup.

Tools wheel hub and bearing removal:
- 12ton shop press (Harbor Freight Tools)
- 30mm deep socket for hub (any length will do you may need to stack other ‘filler’ sockets depending on your shop press height)
- approx. 1 3/4in socket for wheel bearing

Tools for upper and lower bushing removal:
- Large ball joint removal kit ($45 on eBay)
- 32mm socket
- 46 mm socket




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