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Old 12-19-2018, 11:23 PM   #1
bimmerfan08
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19 Million Public Employees Across America Cost Taxpayers Nearly $1 Trillion

Atrocious

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For the first time in history, 19 million public employee salaries at every level of government across America have been mapped and posted online.

The work of our auditors at OpenTheBooks.com tells a compelling story: Public service is supposed to be about serving the people. However, the good intentions of America’s 19 million public employees come at a very high price for the people – nearly $1 trillion. In many cases, taxpayers generously fund these employee salaries.

Our online database is free to use and includes most employees within the federal, state, and local governments. You can search in your backyard or across the nation. Find out just how much public employees made last year. The salary records include name, salary, position title, and employer for 2017.

The data is full of stunning examples. Tree trimmers in Chicago lopped off $106,000. New York City school janitors cleaned off $165,000 while out earning the principals at $135,000. Lifeguards in Los Angeles County, California, made up to $365,000. In the small school district in Southlake, Texas (8,000 students), the school superintendent earned $420,000.

Help the reform-minded mayors, school superintendents, legislators and members of Congress by finding the waste, overspending, and bloated government in your very own neighborhood.

Search our interactive map of the top 2 million most highly compensated public employees across America. Just click a pin (your ZIP code) and scroll down to see the results that render in the chart beneath the map. Click here to access the map below.

Last year, we found 1.7 million public employees earned $100,000 or more. The vast majority – 1.3 million six-figure earners – worked at the state and local levels. There were 105,000 local and state government employees out-earning every governor of the 50 states at a salary of $190,000 or more.

In Florida, the city attorney of the seaside community Dania Beach, Florida (pop. 32,000) gleaned $436,917 – that’s more than any U.S. president. At the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, eight police officers and detectives made between $300,000 and $783,000 last year.

Nearly 10,000 employees of the University of California system pulled down more than $200,000. This includes 65 highly compensated public employees who made between $1 million and $3.6 million.

Across the country, some of the largest salaries were paid out to athletic coaches at public universities. The retired football coach at University of Oregon received a $558,689 annual pension, and the fired Arizona State football coach got a $15 million payout. Nick Saban, at the University of Alabama, made $11 million.

What will you find while searching the public payrolls in your community?

Our recent investigation with Fox 32 Chicago found an Illinois superintendent earning $407,000 in a Calumet City district with only 1,100 students and no high school. Another superintendent made $206,000 in a New Lenox district with only 11 teachers and less than 100 students. Still another superintendent retired on a $300,000 pension at a Park Forest district, but, was then rehired on a $1,200 a day consulting contract – same position, same district.

Before complaining about Washington, D.C., people must insist on good government where they live. The people have the power to hold local politicians accountable for tax and spend decisions. Our mission is to make this information available to citizens and policymakers.

Government payrolls are the No. 1 issue affecting every service: public safety, healthcare, and welfare. Pay, perks, and pension benefits for public employees must be a priority in budgeting and deserve a rigorous, fact-based public debate.

Compiling this database was a spending genome project of sorts. It was a million-dollar effort. In one year, we filed requests and captured data from nearly 60,000 government employers, broke open the files, mapped the information, and posted it online.

The result is treasure-trove of oversight opportunity. It represents approximately 85% of all public employment at every level of government.

Now, it’s up to you to call out waste and inefficiency in your government bodies. Use our interactive map and search by ZIP code, the top 2 million public employees making more than $95,000. Or, use our website to see all 19 million salary records.

Open the books on your local taxing body. See how they are spending your property, sales, and income taxes. Then, raise your voice and demand better government in your own backyard.

Remember, it’s your money.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/adamand...c#6ab260e83b67
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“But as I look overall at the capitalist economies, there are a lot of good things doing, and I think you can tune the tax parameters and get way more equity and get some additional government services and still be in the same basic framework.”
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Old 12-19-2018, 11:25 PM   #2
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“But as I look overall at the capitalist economies, there are a lot of good things doing, and I think you can tune the tax parameters and get way more equity and get some additional government services and still be in the same basic framework.”
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Old 12-20-2018, 04:44 PM   #3
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Old 03-09-2019, 11:03 AM   #4
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Seems like a fitting thread. Ridiculous.

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Feds splurge on lobster, pianos, golf carts in race to spend 'use it or lose it' budget

The end of the government’s fiscal year usually brings an orgy of spending as agencies look at their budgets, see extra cash lying around, and figure they’d better use it all up or risk it getting cut in the future.

The “use it or lose it” mentality explains why the Defense Department spent $9,241 on a Wexford leather chair, $2.3 million on crab and another $2.3 million on lobster tails in September, according to a study released Thursday by OpenTheBooks.

Taxpayers shelled out $97 billion on contracts in September, including a staggering $53 billion in the final week — seven days that cost more than the entire month of August.

“In the final month of the fiscal year, federal agencies scramble to spend what’s left in their annual budget; agencies worry spending less than their budget allows might prompt Congress to appropriate less money in the next fiscal year,” said the report from the government-spending watchdog group. “To avoid this, federal agencies choose to embark on an annual shopping spree rather than admit they can operate on less.”

As might be expected, the Defense Department was the biggest spender, and the most money went to big-ticket necessities such as fixed-wing aircraft.

But there were also the lobster tail and crab, $163,636 spent on paint brushes, and $7.6 million on workout equipment — including ski equipment for “adults and junior” earmarked to Misawa Air Base in Japan.

The lobster tail purchases in September were a bit more than 10 percent of what the federal government spent on the delicacy the entire year, suggesting only a slightly elevated rate of spending.

But more than a third of the $721,661 agencies spent on pianos came in September.

And while taxpayers bought $1.6 million worth of golf carts in fiscal 2018, 42 percent of that was spent in the last four weeks. The same with the government’s bill for china tableware, OpenTheBooks’ founder and CEO Adam Andrzejewski said.

“This year-end spending habit is one of the most deceptive budgetary tactics in use in Washington,” said Curtis Kalin, spokesman for Citizens Against Government Waste. “It’s deeply ingrained in the culture of federal bureaucrats, and it perpetuates the myth we can never stop spending.”

Yet the data shows the final-month binge is getting worse. Last year’s $97 billion marks a 16 percent increase from 2017 and a 39 percent increase from 2015.

“As the national debt surpasses $22 trillion, it’s time to end Washington’s use-it-or-lose-it spending culture,” Mr. Andrzejewski said. “Ending this wasteful phenomenon would go a long way toward generating big savings and winning the public’s trust.”

No aspect of government seemed immune from the urge to binge.

President Trump’s executive office blew through $26.8 million, the report found — up from $24.9 million in 2017.

As the large Defense Department share of spending indicates, much of the contract spending was with companies noted for their expertise in weapons and intelligence technology.

The report showed Lockheed Martin was the largest recipient of cash in the final month, raking in $8.7 billion. It was followed by Boeing with $5.1 billion and Raytheon at $3.3 billion, while Northrop Grumman was paid $1.7 billion.

Many of the smaller purchases might have raised taxpayers’ eyebrows.

For example, federal agencies spent $490.6 million on furniture in the month, including the Defense Department’s $9,341 Wexford chair.

Taxpayers also splurged on one federal agency’s $11,800 tournament-level foosball table, records showed.

Neither the White House’s Office of Management and Budget nor press officers at the Pentagon responded to phone calls and e-mails about the end-of-fiscal-year spending and some specific purchases.

OpenTheBooks’ analysis also showed how the year-end blowout reflects the extent to which Washington and a handful of states have come to absorb so much taxpayer money.

September 2018 was a very good month for the constellation of service agencies and contractors tied to the federal government, as the Washington-Virginia-Maryland corridor was showered with $25 billion, records show.

That haul dwarfed the next largest, geographically, which saw Texas take home $8.9 billion and California $7.14 billion.

While there does not appear to be a quick solution to the long-standing problem, Mr. Kalin noted there is always pending legislation that would reward bonuses to those agencies that prove an ability to cut their budget.

“But the incentives are all backwards now, and this boils down to baseline spending accounting,” he said, citing the federal government’s novel practice of beginning each year with every agency starting at the same amount it received in the previous budget and increasing from there.

“If you had zero-based budgeting that would help a lot, too,” Mr. Kalin said. “But there’s no allegiance in Washington to being thrifty, and so the problem just continues no matter who is president.”
https://m.washingtontimes.com
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“But as I look overall at the capitalist economies, there are a lot of good things doing, and I think you can tune the tax parameters and get way more equity and get some additional government services and still be in the same basic framework.”
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Old 03-09-2019, 05:13 PM   #5
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That's why it is hard to really say we need to cut spending. Any spending we do cut won't touch this crap, but instead will take away from things like our military. If we're spending the money I prefer it go to worthwhile federal causes.
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Old 03-09-2019, 05:56 PM   #6
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Federal and state governments are about 80 percent just alien facehuggers on the US economy.
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Old 03-09-2019, 08:09 PM   #7
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