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Old 01-29-2015, 04:48 PM   #1
Gatriel
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The Ultimate e46 M54 Torque Specs Thread:

Hey All:

So for YEARS now I have taken from the community, and other than $40 a year -- I never give really anything back, so I am consolidating a ton of research into one thread to give the e46 Community a "one stop shop" for the various torque specs needs.

I have ripped about a half dozen screw and bolt heads off various screws and bolts, and I figured -- I am likely not the only one so here it goes from the most common stuff to the least common stuff.

First I'll start off with how to look this stuff up on your own;

Every BMW bolt has a name. No BMW bolt lacks a name. Let me say this again. If you drive a BMW -- ever single bolt and screw in the car has a name -- and it means something.

If you look at a combination of two things with the attached document:

You can always find out the torque specs for the bolt, unless the housing limits it, which I will highlight below.

Lets take a bolt that holds the main drive belt tensioner in place.

Its BMW part number: 07119905533

It looks like this:



And its Name is this: M8X35-U1

The M8 tells you what class* (class meaning the size of the head M = Metric and 8 = 8 mm) of bolt it is.

The X means "by"

The 35 tells you its length in millimetres.

If you look at the photo, you see an 8,8 which translated into American means "8.8" which if you look at page 2 of the attached PDF gives you the torque specs;

17.7 Ft Pounds
24 NM

A lot of people call an 8mm bolt 13mm, because that's the size of wrench you use. 8mm is the outside diameter of the threads.
If you measure the threads of an 8mm nut, it will read less than 8mmm, since your are measuring the inside diameter.

"Pitch" is another spec that's useful to know.
A typical 8 mm bolt has the pitch of 1.25mm. This means the bolt travels 1.25mm over one turn, or the distance between adjacent threads.
The lower the pitch, the "finer" the threads are.

To add to what Jfoj said, you should use a 1/4" ratchet for small bolts, like the 6mm on the valve cover.
The 3/8" ratchet that is used for most applications is too big for them, it's easy to over tighten.

If I do not cover your specific torque below, please PM me with what bolt it is and the correct torque specs, and I will keep this thread updated.



----
Excellent Question
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceric View Post
How do you find the name of a bolt whose head is rusted beyond any readability?
Step 1) Go to RealOEM and find the part number

Step 2) Pop said part number in Google images

Step 3) Click on the ECS tuning photos

Step 4) While you are there go ahead and spend the $5 on new bolts

Step 5) Go to Amazon.com and Purchase Rust Encapsulator, which you can coat the bolt in to prevent it from rusting in the future.
-----
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeetastic View Post
excellent thread...

also a suggestion since this is about torque, maybe links of recommended torque wrench and a how to use it (video)?
Thats a great idea!

This is the Torque Wrench I purchased here in Germany after I ripped enough valve cover bolts off two weekends ago -- and I can tell you this thing is awesome;

Here is the American Version --

http://www.amazon.com/Proxxon-23349-...+torque+wrench

Its great because it is a low torque torque wrench accurate from 6 NM up to 30 NM, which is perfect for our motors.

For the rest of the car, here is its big brother;

http://www.amazon.com/Proxxon-23353-...+torque+wrench

You can never have too many tools -- and if you are doing the work yourself -- you are saving hundreds in labor at the shop, so go ahead and spend some of that on a good torque wrench you can use your entire life.

Here is a review (by a German -- obviously) in English for the torque Wrench.



And how to use a Torque Wrench for Newbies--



Seriously guys -- if you work on these cars (where everything is fricking aluminium) -- and not paying ($$$$$$/€€€€€€/££££££) someone to do it for you -- spend the money you would have on labor on the correct tools.

If you purchase the correct tools -- the tools and the "know how" will stick with you your entire life, and will transfer from car to car to car.

Good tools are an investment in yourself.

Here in Germany we have a saying

"Für alle diejenigen die günstig kaufen, kauft zweimal." It translates "Those who buy cheap buy twice." Spend the cash to get good tools, and you could be buried with them if you wanted to.

(Will edit this into first post as soon as I am allowed to edit it again)



Engine and Engine/Trans/Drive Train Related

Oil Change

Oil Filter Housing
18.5 Ft Pounds
25 NM

Oil Filter Drain Plug
18.5 Ft Pounds
25 NM

Manual Transmission Oil Change

5 Speed Manual
Drain & Fill Plugs
37 Ft Pounds
50 NM

Drain & Fill Plugs with an Alan Head
26 Ft Pounds
35 NM

6 Speed Manual
Drain & Fill Plugs
38.5 Ft Pounds
52 NM

Drain & Fill Plugs with an Alan Head
26 Ft Pounds
35 NM

Automatic Transmission
14 Ft Pounds
19 NM

Rear Differential

For Plugs with a Metal Seal Ring
48 Ft. Pounds
65 NM

For Plugs with a Rubber O-Ring
44.5 Ft. Pounds
60 NM

Oil Filter Housing Bolts (For Accessing Oil Filter Housing Gasket)
15 Ft. Pounds
22 NM

Valve Cover (Bolts & Stand-Offs)
7 Ft. Pounds
10 NM

Vanos Oil Hose from Oil Filter Housing (Hose with Hollow Bolt)
23.5 Ft. Pounds
32 NM

Bolts Holding the Vanos onto the top of the Motor (Nuts & Stand-Offs + 1 Securing Bolt)
6 Ft. Pounds
8 NM

Reverse Thread Vanos Bolts Connecting Vanos to Cam Shafts
6 Ft. Pounds
8 NM

VANOS Piston Plug Caps (the biggest thing you have to screw down in VANOS job)
37 Ft. Pounds
50 NM

Spark Plugs
22 Ft. Pounds
30 NM

Throttle Body Bolts
7.3 Ft. Pounds
10 NM

Belt Tensioners & Pully (Both Mechanical & Hydraulic)

Main Belt
17.7 Ft Pounds
24 NM

A/C Belt
34.7 Ft Pounds
47 NM

Drive Line Belt Pully
34.7 Ft Pounds
47 NM

Thermostat
1 of 3 Identical Bolts (Part Number 11531740317)
7.3 Ft Pounds
9.9 NM

1 of 1 Bolts (Part Number 11531740316)
17.7 Ft Pounds
24 NM

Coolant Pump
Pump
7.4 Ft Pounds
10 NM

Pully (4x 07119904524)
7.4 Ft Pounds
10 NM

Oil Pan Bolts (THESE CHANGE SO ALWAYS REMEMBER WHAT BOLTS YOU REMOVE FROM WHERE
If they have an "8,8" on the head
7.4 Ft Pounds
10 NM

If they have a 10,9 on the head
10.3 Ft Pounds
14 NM

Rear Diff Back Cover Bolts
34.6 Ft Pounds
47 NM

Alternator
Short of the Two (125 MM)
47 Ft Pounds
63.75 NM

Longer of the Two (150 mm)
47 Ft Pounds
63.75 NM

Starter Motor
47 Ft Pounds
63.75 NM

Intake Manifold
M7 Nuts
11 Ft Pounds
15 NM

M8 Nuts
16 Ft Pounds
22 NM

DISA Screws
7 Ft Pounds
10 NM

Suspension & Braking

Caliber Guide Bolts
22 Ft Pounds
30 NM

Wheel/Rim Lug Nut
87 Ft Pounds
118 NM

Control Arm Bushing
44 Ft. Pounds
59 NM

Control Arms

Inner Ball Joint to Subframe
66 Ft Pounds
89.5 NM

Out Ball Joint to Steering Arm
48 Ft Pounds
65 NM

Outer Tie-Rod
Connecting to Steering Arm
48 Ft. Pounds
65 NM

Outer tie rod end lock nut 33 ft lb (what's in the center of the entire tie rod)
33 Ft Pounds
44.75 NM

Inner Tie Rod to Steering Rack
74 + 7 Ft Pounds
100 + 8 NM

Aluminium Brace Subframe Underplate
43.5 Ft Pounds
59 NM

Brake Caliber Mounting Bolts
81 Ft Pounds
110 NM

Rear Trailing Arm
Bracket to Body
57 Ft. Pounds
77.25 NM

Bushing Through Bolt
81 Ft Pounds
110 NM

Rear lower control arm to trailing arm bolt
57 Ft. Pounds
77.25 NM

Front Rear Subframe Bolts
66.3 Ft Pounds
90 NM

Rear Rear Subframe Bolts
57.8 Ft Pounds
77 NM

1 Front Rear Diff Mount Bolt
128 Ft. Pounds
174 NM

2 Rear Rear Diff Mount Bolts
70 Ft Pounds
95 NM

Guibo to Transmission/Driveshaft
74 Ft Pounds
100 NM

Driveshaft to Rear Differential Flange
63 Ft Pounds
85 NM

Front Wheel Bearing Axel Bolt Release
157.8 Ft Pounds
214 NM

Rear Wheel Bearing Axel Bolt Release
157.8 Ft Pounds
214 NM

Rear Axel Bolts to Rear Diff
73.75 Ft Pounds
100 NM

Rear Lower Strut Mount Bolt
84.8 Ft Pounds
115 NM

2 Lower Front Strut Mount Bolts
84.8 Ft Pounds
115 NM

Driveshaft

Driveshaft to Rear Diff
48.7 Ft Pounds
66 NM

Driveshaft to Trans
84.8 Ft Pounds
115 NM


As I said above, I know I am missing tooooonnnnnns of stuff, so if you guys would message me and PM me what is missing I will gladly add it to the list. Please see the follow post for attachment.

Keywords;

"e46 torque specs" "e46 torque specifications" "BMW 3 series torque specs" "BMW 3 series torque specifications" "M54 torque specs" "M54 torque specifications" "M54B20 torque specs" "M54B22 torque specs" "M54B20 torque specifications" "M54B22 torque specifications" "M54B25 torque specifications" "M54B25 torque specs" "M54B30 torque specs" "M54B30 torque specifications" "Z3 torque specifications" "Z3 torque specs" "X3 torque specs" "X3 torque specifications"

Last edited by Gatriel; 01-31-2015 at 02:33 PM.
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Old 01-29-2015, 04:49 PM   #2
Gatriel
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HELP!!!! I STRIPPED A BOLT! I AM A MORON! WHAT AM I GOING TO DO

(Special Thanks to mkodama for writing this section)

Having dealt with a few different german cars with build dates from the past 3 decades, being a mechanical engineering major that finds fastener technology and their physics interesting, a machinist, and a battlebot builder here are some tips that will save you a lot of headaches, possible injuries, and frustration.

A. Bolt head styles to watch out for
B. When to take extra action on a rounding bolt head
C. How to loosen a seized bolt with a head that is starting to round
D. Dealing with stripped threads
E. Preventing seized fasteners, rounded heads, and stripped threads



A. Bolts head styles to watch out for:


1. The Allen head bolt!
These fasteners are wonderful for applications with limited space where their is not enough space to insert a tool, the fastener is recessed within a hole, or the bolt head must be flush to the surface. Commonly these fasteners are made in higher grade(stronger) than other fasteners. Because of all these good features, they tend to show up a lot, more on some cars than others. When it comes to applying torque to these fasteners, they are absolutely horrible because of how small the surface is that you are applying torque to. Take extreme caution with these bolts all the time, as they frequently have considerable installation torques, by nature are easier to strip, and can be very hard to remove if rounded.


2. Phillips and Pozidriv and other
Stupid design in my opinion that is actually designed to have the screwdriver cam out when enough torque is applied to it to prevent damaging the clamping piece. They are so common they show up in a lot of places. Take moderate care with these.


3. Slot or flathead
Annoying to deal with because the design does not center the driver making installation and removal slower and more difficult, but they do have the advantage of applying more torque. The fact that these do not align the tip of the driver axially or concentrically can make them strip easily if care is not taken, in addition to the greater torque they may have to start. Take moderate care with these but if good practices are taken, rarely an issue.


B. When to take extra action on a rounding bolt head:

As early as possible! If your wrench, driver, ratchet, etc... felt or looked like it moved but that bolt didn't, STOP. See if the head is showing indents or rounding of corners. If rounding is showing, do not give it "one more try" or you will be in trouble.


C. How to loosen a seized bolt with a head that is starting to round (from least to most destructive):

1. Check to make sure the bolt is actually able to rotate out. Make sure the two pieces being clamped together are aligned and aren't shearing the bolt. Make sure your wrench or tool isn't contacting anything. Think about whether the part may have Loctite on it or not (if so, heat the bolt up until water boils on contact to disable the Loctite). Check to make sure there isn't anything that is actually keeping the head in place and preventing it from rotating.


2. PB Blaster. It's not hard to find if you live in the US, available in most hardware and automotive stores, and not very expensive. It is not designed to lubricate like motor oil, it is not designed to displace water like WD-40, it is a penetrating lubricate that is designed to wick into thin cracks through capillary action and do a small amount of dissolving, and for that reason you don't let it get on any rubber, plastic, or painted surface. Spray it on, wait 15 minutes, then attempt removing the bolt. Can be left on longer if you are in no hurry and don't want to damage the bolt, as this is your last non-destructive option.


2.5. Try a manual impact screwdriver sort of a half step between on the verge of being destructive and not. It does much of the same as hitting the head of the screw with a center punch like below, but imparts a turning motion at the same time. Put the correct attachment on the impact screw driver, line it up centered, and hit it with a steel hammer. If only a light tap is needed, frequently no bolt damage is done, but damage is definitely possible with harder hammering. Also if using this on sockets, it's somewhat debatable that you should use impact sockets just like a full on impact gun, as normal hand sockets are not designed for impacts and can sometimes shatter.


3. Use a center punch, and a steel hammer, place the tip of the center punch in the middle of the bolt head, and give a big whack. That small jolt is often all that is needed to loosen light corrosion of the threads. This method does not work if the item threads into something soft or light weight, like a door panel screw or a small sensor you have in your hand. Throw away bolt once removed.


4. This method may not be applicable to all situations, as it involves a lot of heat. You take a hand held torch and heat the bolt until it is just barely glowing red, then give another whack with the center punch and hammer like above. You cannot use a lighter or a little kitchen torch, but an actual torch used for construction as pictured above because you want to put a lot of heat into the fastener fast. Let the bolt air cool to the touch and try removing again. Beyond this point, you might as well turn your wrench, ratchet or driver as hard as you can because the bolt head shape is no longer of any use to us. Throw away bolt once removed.


5. Clamp some Vise Grips onto the bolt head, making sure the vise grips will not slip, and turn very hard. You are now running out of options. Throw away bolt once removed.


6. Use a screw extractor, ideally with a left handed drill bit. You should already have a small dent in the center of your screw from the center punch (since this is actually what a center punch is normally used for) that should allow you to start your hole with the left handed drill bit. Screws are usually pretty hard steel, and material is removed slowly, and as a result the drill bit will get hotter than if you cut something softer like wood, plastic, or aluminum. Don't let the drill bit get too hot or you will ruin it! Keep drill speed slow, apply as much controlled pressure as you can, and stop every few minutes to cool the drill bit with anything, motor oil, simple green, water, WD-40, etc... You don't want the drill bit getting hot enough that it changes colors or it will most likely be ruined. If you are lucky, the bolt may just come out here since pressure will be relieved from the threads and the grabbing action of the drill bit will want to turn the bolt. If not, lightly tap in the extractor, and using an adjustable crescent wrench, or ideally a tapping wrench, unscrew the bolt. Make sure you don't break either the tap or the drill bit, or you have made your problem even worse. Throw away bolt once removed.


7. The following method has an almost guaranteed chance of damaging other nearby items, so I am usually against this one. Take a Dremel or other similar small rotary tool and cut a slot into the head of the bolt to turn it into a slotted bolt head. Make sure the slot is as deep as possible, and narrow enough to get a good fit with a slotted screwdriver. Throw away bolt once removed.


D. Dealing with stripped threads

There is only one thing to do at this point, replace the threads. If a bolt already pulled out once, chasing the threads with a die or tap won't do much good. If the bolt, nut, or stud, simple unscrew and replace. If the stripped threads are the female thread tapped into something much larger, things are going to be more difficult. Your best bet is to look into something called a Heli-Coil or Time-sert. The directions vary slightly between whichever thread repair you choose. You want to make sure this is done absolutely perfectly or else they will pull out and you are left with an even larger unusable hole. If you do it right, the threaded hole should be stronger and more wear resistant (if tapped into a soft material like aluminum) than before.

E. Preventing seized fasteners, rounded heads, and stripped threads

1. Always use a torque wrench when installing the fastener. Tightening the fastener more than it needs to be makes it harder to get out later, risks damaging the part being clamped and risks damaging the bolt. Tightening the fastener less than it needs to be makes it much more susceptible to loosening and failure. The only place I frequently skip this are very small fasteners, where I simply stay on the side of tightened "just barely enough", as these fasteners are often holding something flexible and non-critical.

2. Make sure the threads are clean and can be threaded all the way by hand. Unless you are using a locknut, this should almost always be the case. If there are particles, contaminants, or grease on the threads, CLEAN THEM OFF, BOTH MALE AND FEMALE THREADS, and prevent it from getting on the threads to start. I like to spray the threads with Loctite 20162 ODC-Free Cleaner and Degreaser, and then remove with compressed air since this is quick and doesn't cause flash rusting. WD-40 and a shop towel work ok. If there is light surface corrosion on a high temperature part like an exhaust stud, a light brushing with a stainless steel brush is all that is required. "Chase" the threads with a tap and/or die to if there is any stubborn corrosion, dirt, or damaged threads.

3. Use assembly lubricant according to either the repair manual or judgement. If the part is going into a high temperature place like an exhaust or brake rotor, a very small amount of high-temperature anti-seize compound is very helpful, the only exception is spark plug threads where I recommend against anything other than clean metal because this is also an electrical connection, and high vibration fasteners that use Loctite as any dirt or oil prevents the Loctite from working properly. For many other fasteners, a light brushing of clean 30 weight motor oil(the automotive industry standard for installing fasteners) is very helpful in making sure the fastener is torqued to proper clamping load and not just thread friction, as well as reducing the chance of galling from things like steel fasteners rubbing against aluminum threads.

4. If the fastener has deformed threads, damage, or bad corrosion, THROW IT AWAY. As Caroll Smith states in some his "to win" books, "if there is any doubt, throw the fastener in question into the nearest large body of water and see if it floats." Replacing a few bolts is a lot cheaper than what your time should be worth if you have to forcefully extract them later. Damaged fasteners are not only difficult to remove, but can fail and damage even more parts of your car.

5. Use the correct tools and use them properly. If the socket doesn't fit nicely on the bolt head, it will frequently round it off or at the least, damage the bolt head. This is also why we don't use SAE sockets and tools on Metric parts. Don't use a screwdriver that is too small for the screw. Avoid cheapo tools that don't fit well, a good example are how I have only stripped allen head bolts with my cheap Chinese made Neiko Allen socket set, and never with my nice German Wiha Allen keys, which also frequently require me cleaning the Allen socket out or the Wiha keys will have a hard time fitting. If it is a 6 point bolt, try and use a 6 point socket. Use the box end of your wrench when possible over the open end. Avoid ever using a crescent wrench. In addition to the right tools, use them with common sense. Fasteners aren't going to be happy if you try removing them with your tool at an angle.


Conclusion:
Hopefully you can avoid some of the mistakes I have made or this helps you with your current problem. Let me know if there is anything that has been left out!


KEYWORDS:

"M54B30" "M54B25" "M54B20" "M54B22" "torque specs" "torque specifications"
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Last edited by Gatriel; 01-30-2015 at 06:17 AM.
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Old 01-29-2015, 05:08 PM   #3
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Very nice. First ballot sticky I say.
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Old 01-29-2015, 05:15 PM   #4
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^damn straight
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Old 01-29-2015, 05:46 PM   #5
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Thank you so much for this.
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Old 01-29-2015, 07:41 PM   #6
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How do you find the name of a bolt whose head is rusted beyond any readability?
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Old 01-29-2015, 07:57 PM   #7
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Excellent list. But why do you say X means versus?
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Old 01-29-2015, 07:59 PM   #8
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good stuff Gatriel
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Old 01-29-2015, 08:12 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatriel View Post
Its BMW part number: 07119905533

It looks like this:



And its Name is this: M8X35-U1

The M8 tells you what class of bolt it is.

The X means versus

The 35 tells you its length in millimetres.
M8 is not the class, it is the diameter of the thread. M(metric) 8(mm). The 'x' does not mean versus, it means 'by' e.g. 2x4 stud is said 'two by four' and M8x35 is said 'em eight by thirty-five millimeters.' The class (ISO class) is the grade of the bolt, e.g. the 8.8 forged into the head of this bolt.

Knowing your terms is crucial to conveying your thoughts, especially when you're trying to create a how-to.
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Old 01-29-2015, 08:22 PM   #10
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If we could just get everyone to understand that the valve cover bolt torque is 7 ft/lbs and not 10 ft/lbs, seems everyone reads 10 nM and thinks 10 ft/lbs. Then they actually understand how to set the torque wrench and pay attention to the proper scales this would be great!!

SO many broken valve cover bolts, I get tired of reading about it. Maybe for anything under 10 nM or 7 ft/lbs we should tell everyone to skip the torque wrench and choke up on the ratchet.

But at least we are going to hopefully get many of the most common torque specs in one location. All the German manuals make you chase around or refer to another chart to find the torque specs and it can be maddening.
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Old 01-29-2015, 08:27 PM   #11
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To add to what invisible man said:

A lot of people call an 8mm bolt 13mm, because that's the size of wrench you use. 8mm is the outside diameter of the threads.
If you measure the threads of an 8mm nut, it will read less than 8mmm, since your are measuring the inside diameter.

"Pitch" is another spec that's useful to know.
A typical 8 mm bolt has the pitch of 1.25mm. This means the bolt travels 1.25mm over one turn, or the distance between adjacent threads.
The lower the pitch, the "finer" the threads are.


To add to what Jfoj said, you should use a 1/4" ratchet for small bolts, like the 6mm on the valve cover.
The 3/8" ratchet that is used for most applications is too big for them, it's easy to over tighten.

Good idea OP, they should sticky this in the DIY section!
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Old 01-29-2015, 10:34 PM   #12
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Thanks for compiling those torque specs.

For those who come across this thread in the future after the fact, realizing proper torque was not followed on a bolt, here’s some good info compiled by mkodama on seized fasteners, rounded heads, stripped threads, and broken bolts. May be useful to cross-reference: https://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=864113.

Also worth mentioning is that Bimmertools has a torque spec card for easy reference on some of the most common E46 non-M torque specs: http://www.bimmertools.com/Bimmertoo...d-p/e461-1.htm. While not as extensive, it may also be handy to have on hand.
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Old 01-29-2015, 10:43 PM   #13
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I did 10 NM on all thermostat bolts. Would you tighten up the one or leave it alone if there is no problems?
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Old 01-29-2015, 11:08 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by camrydriver111 View Post
I did 10 NM on all thermostat bolts. Would you tighten up the one or leave it alone if there is no problems?

It'll be okay.
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Old 01-30-2015, 12:50 AM   #15
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Thanks for the input thus far. I've updated the OP as well as the second. Thanks for the input guys!
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Old 01-30-2015, 12:51 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceric View Post
How do you find the name of a bolt whose head is rusted beyond any readability?
Justed editid original post with this question in it. Great question.

Last edited by Gatriel; 01-30-2015 at 01:12 AM.
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Old 01-30-2015, 09:08 AM   #17
Knight
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Nicely done. 5 star thread.
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Old 01-30-2015, 09:23 AM   #18
jmo69
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I realize the part that the bolt threads onto is not always accessible, but I have always heated the nut or whatever the bolt is threaded into. Fast heat will expand the hole and allow the bolt to unthread. I also have the advantage of having an oxy-acetylene torch with various sized tips for the right amount of heat for the application.
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Alternative to expensive xi control arm bushings https://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=1231503

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Old 01-30-2015, 10:50 AM   #19
mikeetastic
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excellent thread...

also a suggestion since this is about torque, maybe links of recommended torque wrench and a how to use it (video)?
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Old 01-30-2015, 12:33 PM   #20
Gatriel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeetastic View Post
excellent thread...

also a suggestion since this is about torque, maybe links of recommended torque wrench and a how to use it (video)?
Thats a great idea!

This is the Torque Wrench I purchased here in Germany after I ripped enough valve cover bolts off two weekends ago -- and I can tell you this thing is awesome;

Here is the American Version --

http://www.amazon.com/Proxxon-23349-...+torque+wrench

Its great because it is a low torque torque wrench accurate from 6 NM up to 30 NM, which is perfect for our motors.

For the rest of the car, here is its big brother;

http://www.amazon.com/Proxxon-23353-...+torque+wrench

You can never have too many tools -- and if you are doing the work yourself -- you are saving hundreds in labor at the shop, so go ahead and spend some of that on a good torque wrench you can use your entire life.

Here is a review (by a German -- obviously) in English for the torque Wrench.



And how to use a Torque Wrench for Newbies--



Seriously guys -- if you work on these cars (where everything is fricking aluminium) -- and not paying ($$$$$$/€€€€€€/££££££) someone to do it for you -- spend the money you would have on labor on the correct tools.

If you purchase the correct tools -- the tools and the "know how" will stick with you your entire life, and will transfer from car to car to car.

Good tools are an investment in yourself.

Here in Germany we have a saying

"Für alle diejenigen die günstig kaufen, kauft zweimal." It translates "Those who buy cheap buy twice." Spend the cash to get good tools, and you could be buried with them if you wanted to.

(Will edit this into first post as soon as I am allowed to edit it again)

Last edited by Gatriel; 01-31-2015 at 01:48 AM.
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